Author Topic: Urban Design 101: Walkability  (Read 2869 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Urban Design 101: Walkability
« on: August 25, 2009, 05:17:05 AM »
Urban Design 101: Walkability



Sometimes the smallest design details can add up to make the largest difference when it comes to urban connectivity and enhancing the pedestrian experience.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2009-aug-urban-design-101-walkability

aaapolito

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2009, 07:31:06 AM »
I agree that this type of development should come before mega development; however, isn't the root of Jacksonville's Downtown problem a chicken/ egg issue?  Specifically, what comes first, the development (i.e. restaurants and other businesses) or the people?  Until this is solved, I do not see either the people or the business making the first move.

thelakelander

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2009, 08:03:36 AM »
This issue is much larger than downtown revitalization.

The chicken and the egg should come at the same time.  Development is already taking place all across town.  We just aren't requiring it to be designed pedestrian scale.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Overstreet

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2009, 08:38:07 AM »
I think these are valid points. Especially the one about a clear straight path at restaurants that put out sidewalk seating. Many times they try to get too many tables in too little space.  It either blocks pedestrian traffic or places diners near traffic.

Trees are nice but many in town sidewalks are actually over the basement of the adjacent building. The loads of planters, tree boxes, etc need to be reviewed by a strucutral engineer in those cases. You can't automatically assume a sidewalk is covering dirt.

Overstreet

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2009, 08:40:43 AM »
Urban Design 101: Walkability





I think the canopies would look better if the three singles were a uniform single to continue the symmetry of the other windows.

buckethead

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2009, 09:08:00 AM »
The burglar bars are a welcoming touch.

Captain Zissou

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2009, 10:11:32 AM »
Urban Design 101: Walkability






Oh! Are they finally moving the jail off the river???

tufsu1

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2009, 01:52:39 PM »
I think that the City is finally moving in this direction....the Planning Department hired a consultant (Zyscovich) in 2007 to do vision plans for several areas of the City and help update the comp. plan and zoning code.....the outcome is more encouragement for what they are calling "mobility-oriented development"

Fallen Buckeye

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2009, 06:57:52 PM »
It would be nice to have sidewalks period in some parts of town. If I want to catch the bus home from work I'd have to walk along this narrow strip of grass that is between the culvert on one side and a little 2 lane road that sees lots of truck traffic on the other. Which explains why I drive to work instead. Seems to me that making the city more walkable would almost certainly boost public transit ridership.

Ocklawaha

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2009, 10:23:18 PM »
I think these are valid points. Especially the one about a clear straight path at restaurants that put out sidewalk seating. Many times they try to get too many tables in too little space.  It either blocks pedestrian traffic or places diners near traffic. 

Agree, this could even become a death trap if there was no other perceived quick way out. Anyone who hasn't seen the history channel on the infamous Copacabana Fire, should at once look it up or read the account. Next, go take a look at the Landing, Riverwalk, East toward the Main Street Bridge. Due to an iron railing between the Landing and the river, there is barely room for 2 people to pass. When we have festivals where the courtyard is packed, one flame and people could literally be stomped to death. Where is the owner and our fire marshall on this?

OCKLAWAHA

JaxNative68

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2009, 04:19:58 PM »
LaVilla 2 is a horribly designed building!  Why was it chosen as an image for this article?

Ocklawaha

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2009, 08:34:18 PM »


I think these are valid points. Especially the one about a clear straight path at restaurants that put out sidewalk seating. Many times they try to get too many tables in too little space.  It either blocks pedestrian traffic or places diners near traffic.

Trees are nice but many in town sidewalks are actually over the basement of the adjacent building. The loads of planters, tree boxes, etc need to be reviewed by a strucutral engineer in those cases. You can't automatically assume a sidewalk is covering dirt.

You are right Overstreet, as a kid the sidewalks were full of elevator hatches and gratings, perhaps some of the other old timers remember them. Our city is one of the great cities of the late 1800's and early 1900's with a maritime and railroad tradition... The subterranean city below our feet is full of tunnels, history, mystery and intrigue. Ever heard of being Shanghaied? or Railroaded? Watch out for those speak-easys with the trap doors!

BTW, Savannah, shares our dark underground history, only they have made it a point to record it, publish it and preserve what is left of it.



Port of Portland, OR

OCKLAWAHA
« Last Edit: August 26, 2009, 08:37:59 PM by Ocklawaha »

stjr

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Re: Urban Design 101: Walkability
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2009, 11:51:35 PM »
Glad to see MJ feature sidewalks as I have discussed in a couple of MJ threads.  Wider and more pedestrian friendly sidewalks are a necessary feature, IMHO, for the Jax of the future.  Imagine streets with wide side walks, a street car line,  bike lane and racks, and NO cars!  Could it ever be in Jax?  How long?
Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!