Author Topic: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released  (Read 5302 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« on: March 23, 2009, 05:00:00 AM »
Metropolitan Area census estimates Released



The latest US Census metropolitan area population estimates for the U.S. and Puerto Rico as of July 2008 have been released.  Find out where Jacksonville ranks.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/content/view/1040

JaxNole

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2009, 08:30:33 AM »
I wonder how much of Jacksonville's population growth is from citizens whose commutes are no longer than 10 minutes.

David

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2009, 09:07:12 AM »
Looks like we dropped from the 37th largest metro area to the 40th due to our faster growing cousins.

Duval county only had a net growth of 4,000? Seems pretty weak. At that rate we won't hit 1,000,000 for Duval until 2040.


thelakelander

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2009, 09:43:42 AM »
Growth in Florida is slowing, but our region is pretty healthy compared to some of the state's other population centers.  However, Duval's growth rate is pretty concerning.  Looking at the growth of Clay and St. Johns, its clear that sprawl occurring at a healthy rate, at the expense of the core county.  Looking at South Florida's numbers, it appears that the core county leads the region in growth, which could suggest some level of infill development continues to occur.
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reednavy

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2009, 10:32:56 AM »
Growth in Florida is slowing, but our region is pretty healthy compared to some of the state's other population centers.  However, Duval's growth rate is pretty concerning.  Looking at the growth of Clay and St. Johns, its clear that sprawl occurring at a healthy rate, at the expense of the core county.  Looking at South Florida's numbers, it appears that the core county leads the region in growth, which could suggest some level of infill development continues to occur.
Miami-Dade is still mainly sprawl growth in the Redlands area (Homestead and vicinity), while a portion of that is high-rise population. However, the 3 counties seem to have uniform numbers for the past 8 years of data estimation.

I anticipate for St. Johns to continue to boom, while Clay will probably slow down more. Clay really needs to workout it's issues with getting people into Duval other than just Blanding and US 17.

David, that 4,000 was just for one year, which isn't that bad. For the 8 year span, we still win hands down over the other two counties. At current trends, Duval will overtake Pinnellas around 2015, and crossing 1mil around 2020 to 2025.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2009, 10:39:54 AM by reednavy »
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Steve

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2009, 11:02:40 AM »
4,000 people is essentially births outnumbering deaths

tufsu1

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2009, 02:51:51 PM »
From 2007 to 2008 Florida actually lost population in terms of migration...we only grew because births outweighed deaths.

Much of south Florida's growth has been migration, so we'll see where that goes over the next few years....and while there is infill going on, keep in mind that there is a good bit of undeveloped land in Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties (not including the Everglades).

konstantconsumer

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2009, 03:21:16 PM »
i'd like to see how many people live downtown/springfield/riverside/san marco/etc area.  urban core population, essentially.
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David

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2009, 04:10:16 PM »
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/forum/index.php/topic,4569.0.html

Quote
Lakelander gave a present day population of 112,500 (which would place us as the 12th largest city in Florida) taking into account the old pre-consolidation city boundaries; but again, those boundaries may not have been true today had the city not consolidated (taking possible annexation of some areas into account); we may have gobbled up more southside areas, eastside areas, and some west and northside areas.  Maybe a population of around 250,000 or even less (220,000?) would be about right given the overall appearance of the City, urban size, and size of the downtown skyline.

stjr

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2009, 04:25:02 PM »
Looks like we dropped from the 37th largest metro area to the 40th due to our faster growing cousins.

Duval county only had a net growth of 4,000? Seems pretty weak. At that rate we won't hit 1,000,000 for Duval until 2040.

Who said growth is good?  More congestion, crowding, sprawl..... Where does it end?
Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!

tufsu1

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2009, 04:53:54 PM »
steady growth is good....if you don't grow, you fall behind!

David

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2009, 05:01:20 PM »

Who said growth is good?  More congestion, crowding, sprawl..... Where does it end?

More jobs, more tax dollars, more diversity, more entertainment & cultural options. Or at least, that's my ideal version of growth.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2009, 05:13:17 PM by David »

JeffreyS

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2009, 06:03:12 PM »
Urban growth here is what is needed. We have nice rural areas, nice suburbs, recreation and indusrial areas. We need Urban development and some of the things I would like for the city we probably need more population.
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stjr

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2009, 06:15:42 PM »
More jobs, more tax dollars, more diversity, more entertainment & cultural options. Or at least, that's my ideal version of growth.

steady growth is good....if you don't grow, you fall behind!

Well, then, lets talk about growth qualitatively, not necessarily quantitatively.  We could "grow" our community through increasing per capita income, better education, improving cultural and other qualitative amenities.  How about that kind of growth rather than mushrooming the population, be damned!  There are limits, my friends, to how many people Mother Earth can support before sustainability of the planet is jeopardized.  Remember, Jax wants growth and so does everyone else.  Six billion today, nine billion tomorrow - how many billions served before it all implodes?

Think about all the wetlands, beach access, river access, forests, etc. that have disappeared just in Duval County over the last 25 years.  Repeat this throughout Florida, the U.S., the world....and you begin to see how fast we are consuming the planet.

P.S. Regarding more tax dollars, I think it would be deemed by many that the increase in tax dollars is more than offset by the corresponding increase in tax expenditures for growth.  Let's look at the BIG picture.
Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!

mtraininjax

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Re: Metropolitan Area census estimates Released
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2009, 06:47:03 PM »
I agree, growth without a plan is just waste. For far too long growth without a plan led to large mountainous ski-slopes along Atlantic Blvd, Sunbeam Road, and in trenches that go from US 1 East to Pottsburg Creek.

Growing without a plan has led JEA to want to raise rates for water because while demand for water is lower, the expense to get the water to you has risen due to their "growth" plans.

I was initially all for a new courthouse, but with the economy down, how many people are filling the courthouse for new filings or new marriage licenses, if anything, i see divorces on the rise, and more filings being done online or electronically. So why again does the Clerk need 2 floors of space in the new building? I am all in favor of doing it right, but I don't see the need in this down economy for something so big and audacious.

Makes you wonder about the growth plans in place now. JAA builds 2 beautiful terminals for the future, probably losing their shirt to pay for them, but when the economy comes back, what will the new future hold for JAA? Terminal B upgrade? New art for the lobby? A few new parking decks?

I am always amazed at how we can plan for progress, then we end up paying for it in the good and bad times. I guess a cynic would call that running government like a business.
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