Author Topic: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service  (Read 3831 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« on: December 12, 2008, 05:00:00 AM »
Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service



Connecting Harrisburg, PA with Philadelphia, The 104 mile Keystone Corridor is another example of the type of system Amtrak wishes to establish in Florida, with Downtown Jacksonville as a potential hub destination.

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jbm32206

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2008, 05:36:10 AM »
I'm from Philly and used the rail system often. This area relies heavily upon it and still does. There's also the line that goes from Philly to New Jersey, that crosses over the Ben Franklin bridge (PATCO) and that's very heavily used...and connects with Jersey's light rail, the Riverline....which is a wonderful system. Jacksonville is missing out, and so far behind the times on public transportation...and can learn a great deal from systems such as this

SteveZ

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2008, 10:35:23 AM »
Yes this is in theory a good idea. The thing to ask is how many people would use this? What kind of transportation is available from the stops along the way??

People here in Jax do not commute the same distances as they do in the Northeast or even other parts of the country. I lived in California at one time. The usual commute for people is at least 90 minutes (from towns like Santa Rosa or Novato to San Francisco where the jobs were). That was 20 some odd years ago but the situation probably has not changed that much.  That is not the situation here. Nassau county is comparatively sparsely populated with part of the poplulation driving to jobs in GA and the other part driving to Jax.

Would this end up being something like the monorail in town?? Good for a quick jaunt across the river for lunch but not much of a benefit otherwise.

Lunican

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2008, 10:52:31 AM »
A comparable system here would be a statewide service that connects Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, and Miami.

thelakelander

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2008, 10:56:13 AM »
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Yes this is in theory a good idea. The thing to ask is how many people would use this? What kind of transportation is available from the stops along the way??

SteveZ, welcome to the forum.  This is a great question.  A major benefit of a system like this is that most of the State's amtrak stations are located in the downtown areas of our major and secondary cities.  All of these places are destinations in their own right that will continue to expand and densify.  

Taking a look at our largest cities, there will be additional forms of rail transit to get around:

Miami

Already has heavy rail, commuter rail and a peoplemover in place.  The city also has extensive plans for mass transit expansion.

Fort Lauderdale

Its already pretty pedestrian friendly with Downtown, Las Olas and the Beach connected via Las Olas Blvd.  Plans are also well underway for a streetcar system stretching to other areas of the city.

Orlando

There are plans for a 61 mile commuter rail system that will run from Deland through Orlando, down to Kissimmee.

Tampa

Already has a streetcar system connecting Downtown, the Channel District and Ybor.  Tampa's mayor is also pushing a light rail plan that will connect downtown with the airport and USF.

Jacksonville

Yes, we are the red headed stepchild that refuses to stop inhaling the gas fumes.  We have a lot of work to do here, which is why this site is up and running.  Nevertheless, we do have the resources, bones and density to create a state-of-the-art mass transit system.  We just have to embrace it.

In any event, its unrealistic to think mass transit will be able to get people anywhere they want to go.  But this does not mean it can't be successful moving passengers between large destinations or attract transit oriented development, which creates the option of not having to rely on automobiles 100% of the time.

Quote
People here in Jax do not commute the same distances as they do in the Northeast or even other parts of the country. I lived in California at one time. The usual commute for people is at least 90 minutes (from towns like Santa Rosa or Novato to San Francisco where the jobs were). That was 20 some odd years ago but the situation probably has not changed that much.  That is not the situation here. Nassau county is comparatively sparsely populated with part of the poplulation driving to jobs in GA and the other part driving to Jax.

While holding Jax up to the Northeast and California may not be fair, rail based transit is proving to be a success in several sprawling sunbelt cities such as Dallas, Houston, Charlotte, Denver and Salt Lake City.  Furthermore, Jacksonville's suburbs have the longest commutes in the State, according to recent studies.  Also, rail based transit is used as a tool to change development patterns creating more economic opportunities for the communities they serve.  California is proof of this.

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Would this end up being something like the monorail in town?? Good for a quick jaunt across the river for lunch but not much of a benefit otherwise.

Anything can be a failure if planned, overbuilt, implemented poorly and never fully completed like the skyway.  If we can avoid these issues, we'll have a successful transportation alternative.  Right now we don't have any.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

GatorShane

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2008, 10:57:27 AM »
On a side note, that project in Philly looks incredible. We keep hearing about a lot of our projects getting canceled because of the economy. It seems like every other city is weathering the storm and  going ahead with projects. So much lost potential here.

stjr

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Re: Penn Connects - Multibillion Dollar Urban Renewal Fantasy Becoming Reality
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2008, 01:37:03 PM »
Want to see all your urban fantasies come true?  See the presentation at Penn Connects at www.pennconnects.upenn.edu/ for the multi-billion dollar urban redevelopment plan so often dreamed of on this site that is actually coming to fruition just across the street and southward from 30th Street Station.  It is likely among the largest and most ambitious and sophisticated urban development projects underway in the US right now. 

This plan has evolved from the University of Pennsylvania's recent acquisition of some 25 to 30 aged industrial acres including the main Philadelphia Post Office building, the structure mirroring 30th Street Station across the street.  They are using world leading architects and advanced urban planning concepts.  Dozens of new office and residential buildings, parks, shopping, and connecting structures such as an iconic pedestrian bridge over the Schuylkill river are under way or planned.  All of it is designed to increase connectivity between Penn's campus in West Philly to the Center City's urban core.  Already, the old post office is being or has been converted into office space for 5,000 IRS workers.  And that is is just one building.

Enjoy and keep those dreams alive.  :)
Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!

JeffreyS

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2008, 04:10:33 PM »
We have to take advantage of Amtrak's budget now to start our commuter rail.  If Florida jumps on this we better not let ourselves be left out in the cold.
Lenny Smash

tufsu1

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2008, 05:37:20 PM »
The PENN plan is great...but for all of you folks who think this stuff just happens magically, the ideas were discussed in Philly for over 20 years...and the plan itself was finished in 2001....it took 5 years from there for things to really get moving.

stjr

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2008, 08:48:34 PM »
Actually, Penn has been eying these lands for well over thirty years.  Closing the post office complex finally made it doable.  Penn's history since WWII is getting Philly's redevelopment authority to condemn and purchase blighted areas which it then sells to Penn.  This angered displaced residents and Penn has finally learned how to interact with them.  It offers lots of free programs to area schools, provides many free or low-cost social and health services, and has students performing community services.  Development now factors in their concerns.  I believe Penn was recently recognized as the urban university with the best community relations in the country.

Over the decades, Penn's campus has mushroomed.  Its absorbed the old Philly General Hospital campus and the old Convention Center site.  With its hospital, medical school, research facilities, and Children's Hospital of Philly (home of the first Ronald McDonald house) all located together on campus, it has one of the biggest medical complexes in the U.S. It also has a version of Research Triangle, called the University City Science Center, located on campus.  And ever expanding Drexel University abuts Penn.  Numbering over the equivalent of 150 city blocks, Penn and Drexel are a city within a city.

The City has also closed streets through campus to make it more park-like.  One great asset of Philly is mass transit.  Aside from buses and trains at 30th Street and at Reading Terminal (also home to festival shopping), the subways and subway/surface trolleys can't be beat for convenience.

The Penn Connect web site shows 5 projects finished and 6 under construction (I noticed one is a proton beam facility like in Jax) with lots more to come.  Here is the description of one project under construction, Cira Centre South, already pictured above:

Cira Centre South
2930 Chestnut Street
Planning Strategy: A vibrant mix of uses on the Annex site is essential. Given that the Annex site has prominence as a gateway to University City, and is bordered by some of the most heavily trafficked routes in Philadelphia, the highest architectural, urban design, and planning standards should be used in development.

Program: The Post Office Annex development, as presented in a preliminary design by Brandywine Realty Trust (BRT), proposes two mixed-use towers fronting on Walnut and Chestnut Streets, and a 2400-car parking garage with street-level retail in the middle of the block. The Walnut Street Tower will offer 500,000 sf of office space, with Penn leasing 115,000 sf; 12,000 sf of retail and restaurant space; 200,000 sf, 225 room Hotel; and a 125,000 sf, 50 unit condominiums. The Chestnut Street Tower will provide 300,000 sf of apartments and 7,000 sf of possible retail along Chestnut Street. The parking garage will provide 733,000 sf of parking or approximately 2400 spaces with 1600 reserved for the IRS tenants of the Main Post Office, as well as an additional 11,000 sf of retail space.

Total Project Cost: $520,000,000

Area: 1,888,000 GSF

Occupancy: TBA

Developer: Brandywine Realty Trust

Architect(s):Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Project Manager: Paul Sehnert, Director, Real Estate Development
University of Pennsylvania,
Facilitates and Real Estate Services

Related Links: www.brandywinerealty.com
Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!

stjr

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Re: Amtrak Keystone Corridor Service
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2009, 04:17:52 PM »
Philadelphia's 30th Street Station can now add another moment of history to its portfolio:

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CNN:
 PHILADELPHIA: President-elect Obama kicked off his whistle-stop tour to the nation's capital in the City of Brotherly Love. Watch Obama board the train Some 200 invited guests were on hand at the 30th Street Station.

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Metrojacksonville:
30th Street Station
Owned by Amtrak, Philadelphia's 30th Street Station is the 3rd busiest Amtrak station in the U.S. behind New York's Penn Station and Washington D.C.'s Union Station.  Completed in 1933, the station is located within walking distance of the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University and Center City Philadelphia.  The station also serves as a hub for SEPTA's regional rail and includes retail shops, car rental facilities, and a large food court. 



Hey!  Whatever happened to just plain ol' COMMON SENSE!!