Author Topic: Adecco moving North American headquarters from Jacksonville to thriving Atlanta  (Read 3857 times)

thelakelander

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The Adecco Group said Feb. 24 it is moving its North American headquarters from Jacksonville to Atlanta, but said its business service center that employs more than 600 will remain in Jacksonville.

The Zurich, Switzerland-based staffing and services company has had its North American headquarters in Jacksonville since 2014.

Adecco said it will move key leadership and commercial functions to the new office.

“We look forward to building a hub in Atlanta, where talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving,” said Corinne Ripoche, Regional President of the Adecco Group, Americas, in a news release.

Full article: https://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/article/adecco-moving-north-american-headquarters-from-jacksonville-to-atlanta
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thelakelander

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I find this to be a pretty interesting statement:

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“We look forward to building a hub in Atlanta, where talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving,”

Evidently, they don't think talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving enough locally. What can Jax do to improve in these areas?
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Captain Zissou

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Evidently, they don't think talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving enough locally. What can Jax do to improve in these areas?
Building a technology corridor with light up streets and autonomous vans would really improve all of the above.

CityLife

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I find this to be a pretty interesting statement:

Quote
“We look forward to building a hub in Atlanta, where talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving,”

Evidently, they don't think talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving enough locally. What can Jax do to improve in these areas?

Simply can't compete with Atlanta due to the sheer output of college grads from a diverse array of schools and programs.

Georgia Tech-36,489 students
Emory-15,398 students
Georgia State-52,814 students
Kennesaw State-41,181 students
Morehouse-2,253 students
Clark-3,920 students
Spelman-2,120 students
Agnes Scott-1,079 students

UGA-38,920 students-Hour and 15 minutes away and no other major metro to compete with nearby.
Mercer-9,024 students-Hour and 15 minutes away
 
Jax has done a pretty terrible job of trying to get UF and FSU to open programs or facilities in the city (excluding Shands/UF Health). UF is the #30 (#6 public) and FSU is #58 (#19 public) universities in the nation. For reference USF is #103, UCF #160, FAMU is #241, and UNF is #272. UF is and hour and 15 minutes away and FSU is 2 hours and 15 minutes away. UF has invested heavily in Orlando and FSU in Panama City and Sarasota. As usual, Jax is on the sidelines. 

thelakelander

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Definitely get that Jax can't compete with the Atlanta's of the country. They are in another league. Hoping we can still find ways to up our game in our pool of peers.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

marcuscnelson

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What a kick in the nuts to wake up to.

I find this to be a pretty interesting statement:
Quote
“We look forward to building a hub in Atlanta, where talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving,”
Evidently, they don't think talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving enough locally. What can Jax do to improve in these areas?

Like CityLife said, if Atlanta is the standard for talent, diversity, technology, and innovation, odds are we're dead in the water. Mercedes chose them for a reason. Our post-Consolidation behavior screwed us out of the top tier in our own state, much less other states.

However, that doesn't mean we shouldn't try to do things now to improve. We're finally getting to work on properly funding our school district, getting a good K-12 program is probably important if we want good college programs. We've got what, 3 universities formally here? Plus UF an hour and a half away. I think a lot about how FAMU's law school ended up in Orlando vs anywhere in the northern half of the state.

Honestly, as a UF student I had no idea UF had any true campuses outside of Gainesville. That seemed like a big sticking point about last year's attempt to turn NCF and FL Poly into UF campuses. All that aside, I think it's valuable that the colleges of Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy are apparently all in some form on the Shands campus. There must be some way to better emphasize and grow that experience.

In general, I think UF is close enough that we need to find a way to better connect Gainesville to Jacksonville, to the point that it's easy to jump from one to the other and it's considered less of a "distant place." I don't know if Tallahassee investing in a direct rail line or a new highway or something is the way to do that, but a way should be searched for. In the very long run (I'm talking decades here) I like to imagine that the region between Duval and Alachua County growing together is a realistic possibility if we put some effort into it.

When it comes to UNF, the question I think about a lot is: what are they good at? Like, what would make someone say "I want to go to UNF vs any other school in the state for this." Finding an identity that makes them unique and really good at something in particular could be helpful, because I don't know if I see them chasing down any of the big schools in terms of size.

I think Jacksonville is already to some degree a diverse city, we've just done an absolutely terrible job at highlighting and improving on that. The main areas we're pouring serious money into within the county's borders are largely the same mostly white suburban sprawl as in St. Johns County to the southeast and Clay County to the southwest. Meanwhile Atlanta has been highlighting and investing into areas like Auburn Avenue. We have a long way to go with even simple stuff like making sure communities of color have things like sewer lines or sidewalks.

Technology and innovation are very nebulous terms in this context. Like sure, we can do flashy techy stuff like the Bay Street Innovation Corridor and U2C, but how much is that actually providing a draw for people and companies to come and live here? Or is it about getting tech companies to relocate here? Austin is really sucking the air out of the room on that (we'll see if last week changes that at all). We do have Made in Space, I don't know if that counts for anything. But in general there's going to be a lot of work to do on that kind of front.
So, to the young people fighting in this movement for change, here is my charge: march in the streets, protest, run for school committee or city council or the state legislature. And win. - Ed Markey

jaxlongtimer

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I find this to be a pretty interesting statement:

Quote
“We look forward to building a hub in Atlanta, where talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving,”

Evidently, they don't think talent, diversity, technology and innovation are thriving enough locally. What can Jax do to improve in these areas?

Atlanta's airport is another asset.  Interestingly, Adecco's concerns sound like an echo of what Amazon said they were looking for in their second HQ's.

For Adecco, ultimately, it may be a numbers game based on where they have more clients.  Much bigger Atlanta, especially with all its corporate HQ's, is probably a better base for a personnel-based firm that serves them.

While leaving 600 persons here, we are losing a US HQ's and the community commitment and higher paid execs that go with that.

One thing is for sure, spending almost 1/4 billion dollars on Lot J doesn't address a single one of these concerns.  Maybe we should be looking elsewhere to deploy these funds rather than Lot J and a Four Seasons.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 03:57:30 PM by jaxlongtimer »

jaxlongtimer

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In general, I think UF is close enough that we need to find a way to better connect Gainesville to Jacksonville, to the point that it's easy to jump from one to the other and it's considered less of a "distant place." I don't know if Tallahassee investing in a direct rail line or a new highway or something is the way to do that, but a way should be searched for. In the very long run (I'm talking decades here) I like to imagine that the region between Duval and Alachua County growing together is a realistic possibility if we put some effort into it.

Marcus, recalled this old thread from 2009 on this very subject!  Enjoy the read  8).

Replace Outer Beltway with New Link To Gainesville, I-75, Tampahttps://www.metrojacksonville.com/forum/index.php/topic,4269.0.html

landfall

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This is the danger when your city remains stagnant. Okay you can say its one loss, but these things can easily create a domino effect. These cities like Dallas, Atlanta, Nashville, Charlotte etc have been poaching heavily from other cities and regions. These cities will grab all of our businesses, institutions and sports teams given the chance.

Also as far as them maintaining a presence here, its nothing more than back office, customer facing lower paid jobs, which will be eliminated or transferred in time and help them stem any bad PR from ripping high paying jobs in the city by presenting the notion they are "still committed" to Jax. Its just lip service before the inevitable.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 03:01:56 PM by landfall »

Charles Hunter

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Does this relocation affect their incentives?  Or did they stay just long enough to outlast any clawbacks in the deal?  Kind of like your washer crashing a week after the warranty expires.

Fallen Buckeye

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In general, I think UF is close enough that we need to find a way to better connect Gainesville to Jacksonville, to the point that it's easy to jump from one to the other and it's considered less of a "distant place." I don't know if Tallahassee investing in a direct rail line or a new highway or something is the way to do that, but a way should be searched for. In the very long run (I'm talking decades here) I like to imagine that the region between Duval and Alachua County growing together is a realistic possibility if we put some effort into it.
The Starke bypass has actually been really helpful in getting to Gainesville faster. It's just over an hour from where I live on the west side, so it's not really that distant even without a direct route. I even know people who commute to Gainesville from Jax and OP.

Although I can appreciate the economic benefits, I'd hate to this corridor get built up too much for environmental reasons. That area is actually an important wildlife cooridor since it connects Ocala and Osceola National Forests.

thelakelander

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Regarding the Starke bypass, how has the combined impact of relocating traffic and covid treated the established business base along the old route. One major concern I had about the bypass is that it would hurt Starke's commercial corridor just like the opening of I-95 and 20th Street/Haines Street Expressways helped kill Main Street through Springfield and downtown.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

acme54321

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I'm sure it hurt the businesses that catered to travellers.  Traffic got terrible at peak times though so I'm glad there's the bypass. 

albert_m2

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As an Atlantan , I hate to see this. Atlanta has more than enough going on organically. I've lived here over 20 years and I think, "well, the region will mature and growth will slow," but it has happened.

As an outsider, I feel that Jacksonville has good bones and well, there's no shortage of people who would love to live close to the coast. For reasons stated already by others, it's really staggering that the Jacksonville has capitalized more and cultivated things more.

Site note, a third of the GA Tech number are graduate students in online programs (not that the number of students locally isn't significant).

MusicMan

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"Definitely get that Jax can't compete with the Atlanta's of the country. They are in another league. Hoping we can still find ways to up our game in our pool of peers."

That's the understatement of the year so far, Lake!  Hell, as noted on a previous thread, downtown Jax doesn't even support ONE Starbucks.
Or even a decent pizza place!  Half baked Berkman II still standing after 14 years!  Vacant lots littering downtown.  We aren't really keeping up with Greenville SC if we are being honest.

I'm incredibly proud, and lucky, to be a member of the Jacksonville Symphony. Despite little to no help from our elected leaders the Symphony cranks out incredible performances one after the other, even through the Covid pandemic, to a very consistent and grateful audience.  For anyone interested we are doing a lot of shows in March.  Link here:  www.JaxSymphony.org