Author Topic: Riverfront Parks Now  (Read 3123 times)

marcuscnelson

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2021, 04:58:29 PM »
Is there anything keeping the next mayor (let's assume for a moment that it's Daniel Davis, because odds are it will be) from being enough of an ideologue to just… not do that? I was just reading an article about Alvin Brown and his refusal to raise taxes to the point that Council did it anyway. Why couldn't Davis just let Council raise taxes again? And what keeps Rory Diamond-types on Council from also refusing to do it? What penalty do they face?
So, to the young people fighting in this movement for change, here is my charge: march in the streets, protest, run for school committee or city council or the state legislature. And win. - Ed Markey

jaxlongtimer

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2021, 05:53:02 PM »
^ Just fear of the wrath of Trump "no-tax-increase-ever" GOP voters that make up a big chunk of their base.

And, subject to future events, I think Carlucci can give Davis a real run for the money.  In fact, I think Carlucci may have an advantage at this point in name recognition, favorable image and a wider base of support (maybe Democrats, Independents and moderate Republicans).  Of course, a nasty campaign can change all that as we have, unfortunately, seen in past elections.

Florida Power And Light

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2021, 09:12:33 PM »
Thank you Jaxlongtimer for this post.

A historically significant event.

( I was intending to perhaps post subject, but a combination of disinterest subject overload and curiosity to just watch how something might be empowered was inclination to Wait and thank you here @ page two.
But no accolades for Carlucci- I knew his Dad the Senator well, hand to hand combat on two items ( A certain leg of the First Coast Outer Beltway should be named after Senator Carlucci) and after I have promised self to no longer support serial family politicians Clinton, Bush, Carlucci etc.)


« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 09:24:08 PM by Florida Power And Light »

marcuscnelson

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2021, 01:57:20 AM »
If I recall, Bill Bishop was doing alright in the primary before some guy named after food waltzed in from Tallahassee and immediately rounded up half a million from big donors in the first few weeks. I'm not saying Carlucci has no chance, he certainly does, and I think he'd do a great job. But until someone figures out how to wrassle voters to actually show up without the monetary advantage, we're a city of kingmakers.
So, to the young people fighting in this movement for change, here is my charge: march in the streets, protest, run for school committee or city council or the state legislature. And win. - Ed Markey

Captain Zissou

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2021, 09:00:20 AM »
If I recall, Bill Bishop was doing alright in the primary before some guy named after food waltzed in from Tallahassee and immediately rounded up half a million from big donors in the first few weeks. I'm not saying Carlucci has no chance, he certainly does, and I think he'd do a great job. But until someone figures out how to wrassle voters to actually show up without the monetary advantage, we're a city of kingmakers.

I was at an event before that mayoral election and both Bishop and Curry were in attendance.  I was a big Bill Bishop fan and had gone to events of his.  I didn't even know who curry was at that time.  The head of the local GOP got on the microphone and came just short of threatening the attendees to vote for curry.  He never once mentioned that Bishop was even there.

jaxlongtimer

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2021, 07:27:03 PM »
The real problem with our parks... and it is not the parks!

Mark Woods elaborates:

https://www.jacksonville.com/story/news/columns/mark-woods/2021/02/24/met-park-slippery-slope-kids-kampus-four-seasons/4547769001/

Quote
....Next week will mark the 20th anniversary of the grand opening of Kids Kampus. There won’t be an anniversary celebration. There will be talk of building a Four Seasons hotel.

Kids Kampus didn’t even last a decade. It has been closed since 2010, ever since a planned revitalization of Met Park never came to fruition, with the City Council instead diverting much of the allotted funds to The Landing....

....One of the arguments some have given for doing this — for breaking up our largest downtown public park and turning a piece of it into a private development — is that Met Park is a “failed park.”

If Met Park failed, maybe the problem isn't the 24 acres of land on our riverfront.

Met Park certainly isn’t what anyone wants it to be. But if it’s a failed park, that isn’t because the park failed. It's because the city failed the park. Again and again.

Without sufficient and sustained support, every great urban park in the world would be a failed park. At some point in their existence, many of them were indeed, by this standard, failed parks. And if leaders in these cities had used this logic, they would have given away pieces of their parks to developers....

....In cities more similar in size to us — Cincinnati, Louisville, Chattanooga — those places have transformed riverfronts, all doing something that's worth noting. Instead of shrinking what they envisioned as their iconic riverfront parks, they expanded them....

BridgeTroll

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2021, 06:38:16 AM »
Rebuild the Kids Kampus someplace where there are actual... kids.  The former location was mostly empty most of the time.  Great idea... wrong place.
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

thelakelander

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2021, 07:25:15 AM »
Kids Kampus was isolated but well used. If it were closer to downtown, there would have been more economic spinoff for downtown businesses. I recall many who used to visit, would get back in their cars and drive back to the side of town they came from to eat. Nevertheless,  Jax failed that space. It's unbelievable that it did not last 10 years.
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fieldafm

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2021, 08:41:51 AM »
Rebuild the Kids Kampus someplace where there are actual... kids.  The former location was mostly empty most of the time.  Great idea... wrong place.

Lori Boyer in her time on Council and with the DIA has worked to get something like that at the Friendship Fountain space. I believe the initial design work was funded and completed, but construction bids were delayed as plans for MOSH and River City Brewing began to evolve.






This is the basis of this editorial:
https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/the-rcbc-debate-shows-downtown-needs-a-master-plan/
« Last Edit: February 26, 2021, 08:46:42 AM by fieldafm »

BridgeTroll

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #24 on: February 26, 2021, 09:57:58 AM »
Kids Kampus was isolated but well used. If it were closer to downtown, there would have been more economic spinoff for downtown businesses. I recall many who used to visit, would get back in their cars and drive back to the side of town they came from to eat. Nevertheless,  Jax failed that space. It's unbelievable that it did not last 10 years.

I used to spend quite a bit of time in the immediate area of the Kampus... much like the fire museum... it was empty most of the time.  Occasionally a school bus or van of children would spend an hour there but from my perspective it was empty and unused... I was not at all surprised at its removal...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

bl8jaxnative

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #25 on: February 26, 2021, 10:03:37 AM »

If Riverfront Parks Now wants to be successful, they need to come up with a very straight forward, simple concept and message.  Right now, what little they have is very noisy.

At that, not sure how much success they'll have.  They may need to go big and have a plan that can looks like it helps all the city.  Right now for a lot of Jacksonvillians, it looks like something that doesn't do much of nothing for them.

jaxlongtimer

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #26 on: February 26, 2021, 12:37:52 PM »
Here is more perspective on riverfront parks:

https://www.jacksonville.com/story/opinion/2021/02/26/guest-column-our-parks-not-sale/6817159002/

Quote
OPINION
Guest column: Our parks are not for sale
Your turn
Jimmy Orth

When Metropolitan Park opened in 1984, former Mayor Jake Godbold envisioned a people’s park where all citizens could gather and enjoy the river for generations to come. The park’s success led to the addition of a public marina and the Kids Kampus, an interactive children’s play area that quickly became a popular destination for families throughout the region.

In 2010, funding was appropriated to revitalize Metro Park, but the money was unfortunately diverted by City Council to pay for parking for the now-defunct Landing.

The failure to properly maintain and invest in Metropolitan Park over the years leaves us with the park we have today – one that is underutilized and has fallen into disrepair.

Like all essential public infrastructure, parks must be maintained and updated over time. Our failure to do so is no reason to give away a portion of Jacksonville’s largest riverfront park to a developer for a high-end hotel. 

Parks belong to us. Parks are set aside for our benefit and are intended to remain in the public trust in perpetuity. While there are rare circumstances when selling or repurposing parklands may potentially be in the best interests of the citizens, this is not one of them.

The Downtown Investment Authority’s own planning document says “Metropolitan Park serves as the perfect location for outdoor entertainment” and “recommends the redesigning of Metropolitan Park into the City’s iconic waterfront park, an engaging prime waterfront venue which becomes a regional destination that provides a relevant space for all Jacksonville’s citizens at all times.” 

The bottom line is we need more parks and access to our river, not less.  We also need to protect and invest in the ones we already own.

Destination parks and public green spaces benefit us in so many ways by:

    Improving health and wellness,

    Providing a much needed place for people to access and connect with nature and our river,

    Attracting businesses and residents, creating jobs, and increasing surrounding property values,

    Capturing and filtering stormwater runoff, improving air quality, and providing habitat for wildlife, and

    Protecting us from storm surge and sea level rise and making our community more resilient.


Jacksonville is in an enviable position shared by no other city, and no other city has a river quite like the St. Johns flowing through the heart of its downtown. With so much publicly owned land along the river, Jacksonville has a unique, once in a lifetime opportunity to create a riverfront for all – one including a revitalized Metropolitan Park that is connected to a network of green spaces and active parks. To seize this opportunity, we must begin by developing a shared vision and comprehensive riverfront master plan that involves the public, prioritizes public access, and commits to investing in the public realm. Together, we can create a world-class riverfront that connects the community to our river, stimulates economic development, makes us more resilient, and reestablishes downtown as the heartbeat of Jacksonville.

Jimmy Orth is executive director of the St. Johns Riverkeeper.

Tacachale

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #27 on: February 26, 2021, 03:58:05 PM »
Nate Monroe put out an interesting article a few weeks ago about how Jacksonville's deliberately low taxes and lack of dedicated funds (compared to peer cities) have left a severe burden on public services by running a budget on survival mode for decades. At the end of the day, people always say they want this and that here, but the question for the ages is: how willing are we to pay for it? We only just answered that question with schools last year, and there are a lot more problems like that.

https://www.jacksonville.com/story/news/columns/nate-monroe/2021/02/05/nate-monroe-pandemic-not-jacksonville-crisis-mode-too-often/4403718001/

Here's the thing: every mayor in the last 25 years has raised taxes at least once (or in the case of Alvin Brown, depended on a budget passed by City Council that included a tax increase). That includes Curry. The citizens have voted to raise their own taxes 3 times in that span. That is to say, people don't appear to be as tax averse as some assume - if they see it going to something of value.
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thelakelander

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2021, 04:18:57 PM »
Kids Kampus was isolated but well used. If it were closer to downtown, there would have been more economic spinoff for downtown businesses. I recall many who used to visit, would get back in their cars and drive back to the side of town they came from to eat. Nevertheless,  Jax failed that space. It's unbelievable that it did not last 10 years.

I used to spend quite a bit of time in the immediate area of the Kampus... much like the fire museum... it was empty most of the time.  Occasionally a school bus or van of children would spend an hour there but from my perspective it was empty and unused... I was not at all surprised at its removal...
When we used to go on the weekends, it was always crowded with young families and events like birthday parties. I suspect that the empty days may have been the weekdays, since there was not much of residential population within walking distance.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

BridgeTroll

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Re: Riverfront Parks Now
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2021, 06:54:56 PM »
Kids Kampus was isolated but well used. If it were closer to downtown, there would have been more economic spinoff for downtown businesses. I recall many who used to visit, would get back in their cars and drive back to the side of town they came from to eat. Nevertheless,  Jax failed that space. It's unbelievable that it did not last 10 years.

I used to spend quite a bit of time in the immediate area of the Kampus... much like the fire museum... it was empty most of the time.  Occasionally a school bus or van of children would spend an hour there but from my perspective it was empty and unused... I was not at all surprised at its removal...
When we used to go on the weekends, it was always crowded with young families and events like birthday parties. I suspect that the empty days may have been the weekdays, since there was not much of residential population within walking distance.

That explains our differing perceptions... bottom line is the kampus is better off somewhere else.    :)
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."