Author Topic: DIA wants the Landing to start with a park  (Read 1515 times)

thelakelander

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Re: DIA wants the Landing to start with a park
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2020, 09:22:28 PM »
What they'll hopefully have by mid-2021 is a final conceptual design at best.  The article mentioned what will come next in the design phase:

Quote
Mayor Lenny Curry’s administration budgeted an additional $2 million for the Landing by fiscal year 2021-22 for preengineering, engineering and landscape work on the Landing’s public space.

If we're lucky, there will be a final design sometime in 2022-2023. Before construction will start, there will still be a need to allocate construction funds in the budget. For a decent urban park, that could be upwards of $20 to $50 million. St. Pete's Pier cost $92 million for comparison's sake. This is what I said a few days ago. I stand by it, no matter what the DIA and Mayors Office tell local media, based on person experience of being involved in projects like this in multiple cities throughout my career.


3) Call me an optimist (I totally am), but I think we'll see construction start on the new Landing before we see construction start on anything at the Sports Complex. If the park design RFP goes out on January 1st as planned, we should have a design chosen by the end of Spring that would trigger an RFP for private development of the pads. FDOT starts on the pedestrian ramp removal at the Landing site in February and plans to be wrapped by end of summer. I don't think it's inconceivable that we see major work underway at the Landing by early-to-mid 2022.

You're an optimist. Early 2022 is 13 months away. Nothing will be breaking ground that quick when the RFP for what amounts to a conceptual design competition hasn't even gone out. If any transparent amount of public engagement is included, that alone will stretch out the schedule by a couple of months at the minimum. We haven't even addressed allocating a good $50 million in the budget to pay for a decent space, getting council approval to spend that type of money, time associated with DDRB reviews, permitting with various agencies, etc.

Based on this most recent article, we'd be lucky if the engineering level design phase will even be underway by early 2022.
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Ken_FSU

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Re: DIA wants the Landing to start with a park
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2020, 12:20:05 AM »
^Keep in mind that, back in 2017, I thought the Trio would be complete, the Landing would be redeveloped, and the Shipyards would be under construction by end of 2020 ;D

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thelakelander

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Re: DIA wants the Landing to start with a park
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2020, 12:34:33 AM »
I'd have to go back and look it up but I feel we're a year behind with current Landing RFP talk. I recall this was something Hughes and Boyer claimed at one point that would take begin in early 2020.
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marcuscnelson

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Re: DIA wants the Landing to start with a park
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2020, 01:55:42 AM »
What they'll hopefully have by mid-2021 is a final conceptual design at best.  The article mentioned what will come next in the design phase:

Quote
Mayor Lenny Curry’s administration budgeted an additional $2 million for the Landing by fiscal year 2021-22 for preengineering, engineering and landscape work on the Landing’s public space.

If we're lucky, there will be a final design sometime in 2022-2023. Before construction will start, there will still be a need to allocate construction funds in the budget. For a decent urban park, that could be upwards of $20 to $50 million. St. Pete's Pier cost $92 million for comparison's sake. This is what I said a few days ago. I stand by it, no matter what the DIA and Mayors Office tell local media, based on person experience of being involved in projects like this in multiple cities throughout my career.

To top it off, this will likely (even if it shouldn't) be competing with Metro Park (once NPS approves a move) for funding. I get a bad feeling that Jacksonville of all places isn't about to drop big money on two urban riverfront parks, which means one is probably going to get short-changed.

Or worse, that neither are decent urban riverfront parks.
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