Author Topic: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville  (Read 636 times)

thelakelander

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Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« on: August 04, 2020, 09:11:24 AM »
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Many cities are looking for solutions to the issues caused by gentrification – the influx of new money into neighborhoods that often causes displacement of older residents. One emerging strategy is 'withintrification,' where the changes and investment are driven by the current residents instead of outside developers and politicians. Could this approach work in Jacksonville's increasingly popular Urban Core?

Read More: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/gentrification-vs-withintrification-in-jacksonville/
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vicupstate

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2020, 09:30:59 AM »
With enactment of the Opportunity Zone tax laws, I expect an increase in gentrification nationwide unless something of this nature is put in place to mitigate that situation.
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JaxJersey-licious

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2020, 02:04:09 PM »
Very informative article but I have some questions over the terms. If there is  group willing to take on the  proper preservation, restoration, promotion, and maintenance of these neighborhood highlights with plenty of input and guidance from historians and the community does it really matter if the resources mainly comes from people and organizations “outside” or “inside” the community? If their ultimate goals are the same it just seems to me its the same old story of trust, track record, and control which can hamper ambitious programs like this.

Another issue from what I take from the article is no matter what term you use or how you go about it wouldn’t any successful implementation of these projects still result in the main problem of gentrification: the pricing out and displacement of more long term residents of that community? Aren’t the public policies advocated like mixed-income multifamily housing, traffic eliminating mass transit, multiple transport options, and expanded greenspaces that would benefit current residents also attract newer ones like gentrification now does? As opposed to outside investors buying up and rehabbing neighborhood properties, is it any different if an individual homeowner decided to renovate their own property to capitalize on the demand which in turn ends up displacing current tenants or encourages the homeowner to sell to someone who may not be as historically active or involved in the community as the previous residents?

thelakelander

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2020, 03:16:54 PM »
Very informative article but I have some questions over the terms. If there is  group willing to take on the  proper preservation, restoration, promotion, and maintenance of these neighborhood highlights with plenty of input and guidance from historians and the community does it really matter if the resources mainly comes from people and organizations “outside” or “inside” the community? If their ultimate goals are the same it just seems to me its the same old story of trust, track record, and control which can hamper ambitious programs like this.

Goals can be the same but cultural understanding, perspective and access to information rarely are. That's where things can really spiral out of control for a disenfranchised and marginalized population. If you don't have direct access and a set at the decision making table, you likely end up being the meal, regardless of original goals and intent.

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Another issue from what I take from the article is no matter what term you use or how you go about it wouldn’t any successful implementation of these projects still result in the main problem of gentrification: the pricing out and displacement of more long term residents of that community?

Not necessarily. Gentrification is more than simply pricing out and displacing long term residents. However, if these aspects of gentrification are the major concern of a community, there are tools and solutions that can be put in place early on to limit this particular impact.

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Aren’t the public policies advocated like mixed-income multifamily housing, traffic eliminating mass transit, multiple transport options, and expanded greenspaces that would benefit current residents also attract newer ones like gentrification now does?

Part of this issue is resolving the problem that scarcity brings. The Atlanta BeltLine has gentrified areas along its path rapidly because Atlanta does not have a robust system. So like a small historic district with the only dense concentration of bungalows in a sprawling city, the scarcity issue to lead to gentrification on a grand scale. On the other hand, both Houston and St. Pete have much larger off road trail systems that tie in multiple neighborhoods through their limits. More inclusive access, regardless of the neighborhood, reduces the problems that scarcity brings.

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As opposed to outside investors buying up and rehabbing neighborhood properties, is it any different if an individual homeowner decided to renovate their own property to capitalize on the demand which in turn ends up displacing current tenants or encourages the homeowner to sell to someone who may not be as historically active or involved in the community as the previous residents?

The biggest difference is in the scenario you mention, a larger portion of existing residents would enjoy and benefit in economic prosperity. Typically, the existing homeowners and renters in a disenfranchised community end up getting displaced with no direct economic benefit. Inclusive economic opportunity and prosperity is a good thing. Even if an existing resident uses the enhanced access and knowledge to make an economic come up for them and their family.

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JaxJersey-licious

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2020, 11:14:12 PM »
Thanks for the clarifications. You made a really good point concerning the larger scale and scope of what these revitalization efforts are trying to accomplish while I was referring to more narrow and specific examples of the perils of gentrification.

So could there be specific ways these policies could be utilized in a community that has been going through gentrification with mixed results besides what you mentioned in the article? Lets focus on one example: The Over The Rhine neighborhood in Cincy. I've never been but from what I read and from what friends told me it is one of the greatest turnarounds of a down and out part of town and yet apparently not everyone is benefitting from the revitalization equally. What could be learned and are there thongs that could and should be done to integrate long term residents in its successes?

thelakelander

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2020, 09:57:03 AM »
The best chance for success with the idea of withintrication would be a community getting organized and taking a lead early in the game. For the Deuces in St. Petersburg, something like becoming a neighborhood Florida Main Street program has helped sustain historic culture and support the historic neighborhood commercial district, creating jobs within the community, allowing dollars to recycle in the neighborhood. On the other hand in Jax, Brooklyn has been largely lost. Back in 2014, an effort to designate a portion of the neighborhood as a local historic district would have helped. However, that tool came too far down the line and was defeated because new property owners with new infill development on their minds, by then had made up the majority of neighborhood property owners.

As for OTR, I haven't visited Cincinnati in a decade. Even then, it had undergone significant gentrification. By now, that would likely be a community where the majority of long time residents have already been displaced. However, I don't know the demographic make up of OTR to make a fair assessment on what, if anything, could be done by now. With that said, I'd be interested to see how the West End and Walnut Hills are faring today. Both aren't too far from OTR and any gentrification OTR has stimulated over the last 20 years would likely start to spill over into neighboring communities. So they could very well be where that withintrification battle and opportunity may exist today.
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thelakelander

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2020, 10:13:53 AM »
A few images of OTR back in 2009:











^This was during an economic recession and even then, it had completely changed since my visits during the late 1990s and early 2000s. I can only imagine the change after a 10 year economic boom for American urban districts. Especially this one, which has seen a modern streetcar line added and millions dumped into the retrofit of Washington Park since then.
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bl8jaxnative

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2020, 11:41:04 PM »

I'd be pretty worried about losing Mixontown.   A lot of this gentrification doesn't just pop up out of the blue.  It's gotta have some good groundwork laid, most importantly ordering areas that aren't too bad.  Like money follows money. 

Mixtown has some space that could be well used for development.  I'd love to see something done to preserve the vibe in few stretches - the yellow boxes.  It's just got a good feel.  Even with a few empty houses mixed in.

https://www.screencast.com/t/nPwGIEqp7


bl8jaxnative

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2020, 11:43:26 PM »
Nice thing about openstreetmaps is they're default display when you zoom in shows the houses.  Y'll can see where there's some empty lots that could be consolidated for modern triplexes and a pocket park or two.


This is what I mean about it just feels good.  You can't build this sort of thing from scratch.  A good neighborhood has to marinate.

https://www.mapillary.com/app/?lat=30.32428611111111&lng=-81.69409166666667&z=17&pKey=c54qXVBxY-p2sYbgqdtdjA&focus=photo&x=0.5240118241952045&y=0.6898321633953931&zoom=0

thelakelander

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2020, 08:13:47 AM »

I'd be pretty worried about losing Mixontown.   A lot of this gentrification doesn't just pop up out of the blue.  It's gotta have some good groundwork laid, most importantly ordering areas that aren't too bad.  Like money follows money.

It's pretty imperative that the community moves quick to limit ultimate displacement. About 40% of the population current owns their property and that number is in decline. Since their history is important to them, pursuing a historic district designation is a move they can easily make to reduce the threat of multiple homes being razed for the mid-rise frame apartments going up in Brooklyn. It would also open the door to getting infill development (even single family and missing middle housing) to fill in compatible. If they don't have the support for a national register or local historic district designation, they can immediately start landmarking sites that the community believes means the most to them. Being officially designated will allow some properties there to benefit from tax credit and grant programs that they currently don't have access too. So it's also a move that sets the community up for more inclusive economic opportunity. In many cases, the things that people in areas like Springfield and Riverside have benefitted from, residents in disenfrancished communities simply don't know and miss out on until its too late. So really, in some cases, activating a community to lead is simply giving them access and a seat at the decision making table to be able make their own decisions. They now have this information and the forms to get either route started because I gave it to them. 

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Mixtown has some space that could be well used for development.  I'd love to see something done to preserve the vibe in few stretches - the yellow boxes.  It's just got a good feel.  Even with a few empty houses mixed in.

This is where some neighborhood visioning analysis and modifying land use and zoning would help. Zoning can be a strong tool that helps limit displacement by directing new infill growth to certain areas that can better accommodate the needs of modern development. Some of the natural locations would be the former industrial sites that have closed over the last few decades. Those lots tend to be along the fringe of the historic residential lots and much larger in size. The better you can balance the needs of new and old, the more successful the neighborhood will be in the long run.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2020, 11:09:19 AM by thelakelander »
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bl8jaxnative

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Re: Gentrification vs. Withintrification in Jacksonville
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2020, 10:46:31 AM »


Thank ou