Author Topic: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released  (Read 741 times)

thelakelander

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2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« on: May 29, 2020, 09:31:49 AM »
Quote


The Trust for Public Land has released its annual ParkScore list for the country's 100 largest cities. The ParkScore criteria includes the percentage of residents who live within a 10-minute walk of a park, percentage of city land dedicated to parks and recreation, park amenities and a city's investment in its parks.

Read More: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/2020-ranking-of-us-cities-by-parkscore-released/
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Ken_FSU

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2020, 11:11:47 AM »
What park is that in the main article photo?

Looks amazing.

Charles Hunter

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2020, 11:29:27 AM »
Isn't it Gas [something] Park in Seattle?


ETA
Gas Works Park - Seattle
https://www.seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/gas-works-park
« Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 11:45:56 AM by Charles Hunter »

jaxlongtimer

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2020, 11:39:57 AM »
It appears that Jacksonvillle's 35% rating is at or near the lowest level.  Yet, we have the most park land of any city.  I believe this is a result of most of our park acreage concentrated in a few large parks leaving little in neighborhood parks.  I recall that this arrangement was discussed in a prior thread here a few years ago.

Is there any requirement for mega developers to incorporate public parks in their developments, or just resident-restricted amenity centers?  If not, they should at least have to dedicate land just outside their developments toward neighborhood parks or pay into a park acquisition fund on par with concurrency payments for roads.

Overall, is there any master plan for adding parks in Duval County that would lead to remedying this issue?  I have never heard of one.  I guess any dollars we have for that are going to the Stadium and Lot J (another $8+ million "emergency allocation" for Stadium upgrades and maintenance this past week was made from the general City budget that "has no money" for everything else and because the bed tax money has already been fully committed for prior upgrades and maintenance).  If people only recognized how much the Stadium district is draining the whole rest of this City!
« Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 11:42:03 AM by jaxlongtimer »

thelakelander

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2020, 12:53:32 PM »
What park is that in the main article photo?

Looks amazing.

Yes Gas Works Park. It is a pretty great space that combines the history of an abandoned industrial site with open waterfront space. These images were taken a couple of years ago (2015 or 2016) during an APA National Conference.











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Charles Hunter

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2020, 02:21:17 PM »
It looked pretty good when I went by it on a "Duck" tour when I visited Seattle in the prior decade.

Keith-N-Jax

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2020, 04:37:11 PM »
That gas works park. Jax would have torn that down.

jaxlongtimer

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2020, 06:35:25 PM »
What park is that in the main article photo?

Looks amazing.

Yes Gas Works Park. It is a pretty great space that combines the history of an abandoned industrial site with open waterfront space.

Was this once a coal gasification plant site? If so, I understand these can be major environmental messes.  Was this site thus mitigated and then converted into the park?  Wish Jacksonville was doing the the same with its waterfront industrial sites, the Shipyards and/or the former JEA power plant being redeveloped into the District.

That gas works park. Jax would have torn that down.

Yep.  This far exceeds Jacksonville's standards (NOT!) for demolition.

thelakelander

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2020, 06:56:41 PM »
Yes, it was a coal gasification plant that closed in 1956. What they did would be comparable to turning the shipyards into a public park, leaving most of the buildings, cranes, machinery, etc. as artistic elements.

Quote
Though gas production ceased in 1956, the buildings and manufacturing structures were still intact in 1962 when the city of Seattle began purchasing the abandoned gas works. The $1.34 million purchase price was provided by Forward Thrust bonds, and HUD payments were made from 1962 to 1972, and the debt was retired.

During this period, there was a considerable public discussion about whether the site should be developed or made into a park. Park advocates led by Myrtle Edwards prevailed. In 1970, Richard Haag Associates (RHA) were retained by the Seattle Park Board to do a site analysis and master plan for a new park at the gas plant site. RHA opened an on-site office to research and analyze the plant site. Richard Haag realized that the site contained the last gas works and a unique opportunity for preservation. Haag recommended preservation of portions of the plant for its "historic, esthetic and utilitarian value". (Master Plan, April 1971) After an intense public appeal to convince the public of the value of the plant, RHA's 1971 master plan for an industrial preservation park was unanimously approved by the Park Board. The proposal centered on recycling the buildings, production structures, machinery, and even the grounds themselves. Through bio-phyto-remediation techniques, the soil and water would be "cleaned and greened". Through preservation and adaptive reuse of key structures, the rich history of the site and thus of an important aspect of Seattle would be preserved and revealed.

The abandoned gas-production plant and its land were deeded to the city of Seattle in 1975, the same year Gas Works Park (GWP) opened to the public. The park site consists of 20.5 acres (83,000 m2) of land projecting 400 feet (120 m) into Lake Union with 1,900 feet (580 m) of shoreline. The site is bordered by Northlake Avenue at the north and abuts Lake Union on the east and south. The Wallingford neighborhood sits to the north. Immediately adjacent to the park are remnants of the industrial development of the area. The industrial dominance is rapidly being replaced by retail development. North of North 40th Street the area is predominantly a residential neighborhood.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_Works_Park
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jaxlongtimer

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2020, 07:27:46 PM »
Yes, it was a coal gasification plant that closed in 1956. What they did would be comparable to turning the shipyards into a public park, leaving most of the buildings, cranes, machinery, etc. as artistic elements.

Thanks, Lake.  Your suggestion for the shipyards would take vision, creativity, imagination, commitment to history and more... all sadly lacking with our City leadership.  Now, if you want to invest every last penny you have in a stadium or handing welfare to a billionaire's development project, we are your place.

bl8jaxnative

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2020, 10:48:51 AM »
It appears that Jacksonvillle's 35% rating is at or near the lowest level.  Yet, we have the most park land of any city.  I believe this is a result of most of our park acreage concentrated in a few large parks leaving little in neighborhood parks.  I recall that this arrangement was discussed in a prior thread here a few years ago.

JAX has all sorts of parks all over.  A lot of small parks.   

Chekc out the methodology.  They place a high importance on 3 things that fail to capture why  JAX is one fo the best:

a) Within 10 minute walk
b) actual park facilities --> hoops, splash pads, senior centers ( seriously? ), etc.   Having open space w/ a playground gets ya bupkiss.
c) Pure $$$$$$$$ spending.
d) HOA facilities don't count as parks


C is going to give rich cities like NYC and MPLS    Minneapolis has half the population and more than twice the parks budget than JAX.

Cities at the top are also compact.  Cities like Jacksonville and Indianapolis that went through consolidation are largely suburban.  They natually score at the bottom of this metric.

By the other measurements Jacksonville does fairly well.  In fact, take out the hoops + dog parks measurement and they're one of the best in the nation in that category.



Todd_Parker

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2020, 11:02:55 AM »
Was Jacksonville’s ranking determined before the addition of Curry Lawn Park on the downtown riverfront?

thelakelander

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2020, 05:14:15 PM »

Chekc out the methodology.  They place a high importance on 3 things that fail to capture why  JAX is one fo the best:

a) Within 10 minute walk
b) actual park facilities --> hoops, splash pads, senior centers ( seriously? ), etc.   Having open space w/ a playground gets ya bupkiss.
c) Pure $$$$$$$$ spending.

d) HOA facilities don't count as parks

Three of these are pretty important measurements for parks that more people (even if they don't own a car or boat) can actually use. Especially park facilities and the continued maintenance of them. All three are things that should be high priority for Jax to improve upon, regardless of its ranking on this list.



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Florida Power And Light

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2020, 08:55:41 PM »
Ha!..... Interesting to see reference to Trust For Public Lands.

Back when Oakleaf ( former Gulfstream land, then eventually held via Trust For Public Lands Will Aberger/ Florida Game and Fish Commission Brannon Chaffee Mitigation Park, a large chunk relinquished to private purchaser, for a short period the new private lands aka “ The Farm”..... destined to define Oakleaf) was envisioned, design chartette one would of thought Oakleaf was to unfold as a Walkable Nirvana, a deep Westside Avondale.

vicupstate

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Re: 2020 Ranking of U.S Cities by ParkScore Released
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2020, 11:57:38 AM »
JAX has a massive amount of 'acreage' of parks but the vast majority of it is actually 'conservation' land that is not accessible, and does not serve as recreation at all.  The funding is very low and the maintenance shows it.

Having something to actually recreate with is important. There are several 'parks' in Jacksonville that are literally nothing more than a grass lot with some trees. Lake is right that being within walking distance is important.
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