Author Topic: Jax's most endangered historic buildings in 2020  (Read 1534 times)

jaxlongtimer

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Re: Jax's most endangered historic buildings in 2020
« Reply #15 on: May 18, 2020, 12:18:17 AM »
Neither are related to each other. The office building isn't over the creek, the printing plant is.

Also, there's only so much daylighting that can be done. A lot more covers the creek than the FTU property. With that said, even their latest concept places another building over the creek:



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Boyer said McCoys Creek probably will have some recreational boating access.

“I just don’t know that you will have enough width to get to a docking space up by the convention center. You’ll have some physical access to that location but I think at this point the surface of the creek is either going to be 60 feet wide or 42 feet wide and with the slope of the bank, the concern is that it’s going to be pretty limited on the number of vessels that could be in there at the same time,” she said.

The good thing, based on the drawing, is the creek shows its 60 feet wide vs. the 42 ft. alternative mentioned.

The bad news is the hotel is front and center over the creek along with its entry drive.  I would think the section of the hotel over the creek could be elevated a number of feet (start with second or third floor there) above the base elevation to give more "air" to the creek (a glass floor over the creek would be cool!) but that entry drive would still be an issue.  With a little effort, it seems they could find a way to move the entry drive (and hotel entrance) from directly above the creek to the west side of the creek, closer to the entry to the parking garage.  Better yet, have the hotel entry from the ground level of the garage and just make the exposed driveway a drop off zone.

The main drive over the creek would be neat if it had a little signature hump to it but I imagine the expense may be a hindrance.

It also looks like there will be some type of driveway along side the hotel running underneath the ramps to the Acosta Bridge.  Will be interesting to see where that ends up terminating.

jaxlongtimer

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Re: Jax's most endangered historic buildings in 2020
« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2020, 02:30:17 PM »
This list needs to be expanded to include outlying areas.  Here are at least two houses in Mandarin from 1877 and 1907 that sit on farm property now up for rezoning for subdivisions.  One is in the news today.  While the developers have offered to relocate the houses, we know from the same offer for Fire Station #5 that doesn't guarantee preservation of the buildings.

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...Property records show two single-family homes on the property. One is the split-level Henry C. Arpen Farmhouse of 1,360 square feet, built in 1877. It was placed on the Federal Historic Register in August 2019.

The developer is offering to donate and relocate the historic farmhouse within Jacksonville or on a lot near the entrance of the community. The exterior will require extensive repairs to the foundation, roof and siding, Danhour said....

https://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/article/planning-commission-recommends-approval-of-melcon-farm-in-mandarin



Here is the other on Loretto Road:
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More than 7,000 people signed a petition to stop the proposed property rezoning for a subdivision along the north side of Loretto Road in Mandarin.

Those opposing the rezoning at Change.org, an online petition platform, view the site as the “historic Bowden farmstead property” comprising a historic house and farmland with a pecan grove.

Jacksonville-based developer Curtis Hart with Hart Resources LLC proposes a planned unit development with 55 70-foot-wide lots, less dense than existing development to the west and north.

The PUD ties development to a specific site plan and establishes architectural controls for the homes. Hart Resources said it is willing to preserve the historical portion of the house by relocating it on the property.

Local historian Wayne Wood wrote in his 1989 book, “Jacksonville’s Architectural Heritage,” that the two-story white house, built in 1907 for Fleming H. Bowden, is “an important link to Mandarin’s architecture.”

Wood wrote that the house, which fronts Loretto Road, exhibits the “strong vertical character” of the time. The house originally had a two-tier veranda wrapping around its right side.

He wrote that Bowden was a blacksmith and vegetable peddler who became Duval County Supervisor of Elections for 21 years until he died in 1964.

Charles and Murel Cissell bought the house and 10 acres from the Bowden estate in 1963 and added more land to total 23.59 acres....

https://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/article/the-sailer-report-bowden-farmstead-property-at-heart-of-rezoning-debate
« Last Edit: September 18, 2020, 02:34:58 PM by jaxlongtimer »

vicupstate

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Re: Jax's most endangered historic buildings in 2020
« Reply #17 on: September 20, 2020, 09:11:19 PM »
^^ I admit it doesn't sound good, but it is not often that an owner will pay for the MOVING expenses, usually they just donate the structure itself, which still leaves a hard to fund problem. 
« Last Edit: September 21, 2020, 11:38:00 AM by vicupstate »
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