Author Topic: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates  (Read 1088 times)

thelakelander

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U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« on: April 02, 2020, 08:06:53 AM »
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A look at where the country's largest metropolitan statistical areas rank in population, according to the United States Census Bureau's recently released 2019 population estimates.


Read More: https://www.thejaxsonmag.com/article/us-metropolitan-area-2019-population-estimates/
« Last Edit: April 02, 2020, 08:12:44 AM by thelakelander »
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jaxlongtimer

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2020, 11:13:08 PM »
Almost all of the "top 200" have more people than Jacksonville did circa 1960.  Most "small towns" when I was young are now bigger than the "big" towns of old.  Further evidence of our spreading population.  Less and less places "undiscovered" in the US or even worldwide.  3x the people over the last 50 to 60 years if I have it right.

Enjoy whatever "density" we have now as its only going to get more crowded in the years to come  8).  Many rural areas should be put on the endangered list.

I-10east

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2020, 12:59:22 AM »
^^^Jax had around 201K people in 1960. I seriously doubt that the top 200 US cities had more people than Jax back then. Jax actually had more influence in Florida back then also. 

Charles Hunter

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2020, 07:56:12 AM »
Almost all of the "top 200" have more people than Jacksonville did circa 1960.  Most "small towns" when I was young are now bigger than the "big" towns of old.  Further evidence of our spreading population.  Less and less places "undiscovered" in the US or even worldwide.  3x the people over the last 50 to 60 years if I have it right.
I read that as saying that TODAY many of the places on the list have more population than Jax had in 1960.

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Enjoy whatever "density" we have now as its only going to get more crowded in the years to come  8).  Many rural areas should be put on the endangered list.
This is the basis for much of the opposition to the two Turnpike extensions mandated by the Legislature. It is feared (reasonably so) that they will encourage suburban-style development in what are now small towns and rural areas.

thelakelander

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2020, 08:51:42 AM »
Of course they will. That's the real intent of these roads. Economic development yet we still attempt to sell these things off as being needed to relieve congestion, move people and goods. In reality, people will move just fine without them.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

I-10east

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2020, 07:24:49 PM »
I was just crunching some year to year numbers concerning metro population growth in the state of Florida (from 2018 to 2019).

Jacksonville's metro gained 24, 813
Orlando's metro gained 35, 454
Tampa/St Pete's metro gained 52, 168
Miami/Ft Lauderdale metro LOSS -32,304

Very shocking numbers from South Florida. I guess that gaudiness and luxury isn't everything when the average person can't afford it; ask the state of California. If anyone wanna proofread me (I'm not perfect) here are the old numbers on wiki below (archived to keep it outdated). Subtract the old number from the new number. 

 https://archive.is/FnyQS
« Last Edit: April 03, 2020, 07:39:50 PM by I-10east »

thelakelander

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2020, 08:27:27 PM »
The Census Bureau lists the Miami MSAs 2018 population estimate at 6,143,837 and the 2019 estimate at 6,166,488. The wiki source for 2018 may be wrong:

"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

I-10east

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2020, 09:04:39 PM »
^^^I hear ya.

JaxJersey-licious

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2020, 05:04:57 PM »
Fun with numbers! I didn’t think the 2019 census estimates have been released to the public yet but it has been interesting to chart the growth of metropolitan Jacksonville and other regions over the last several years. The last several years Jacksonville has seen quite steady explosive growth compared to most metros in the nation and especially compared to the early recession recovery years from 2010 to 2012 and I was curious to see if they kept up the pace.

From 2017-2018 Duval, St Johns Clay, Nassau, and Baker counties showed a gain of 28,477. The increase in 2018 estimated gains were 29,860. So according to the recently posted figures for 2019 the First Coast gained another 24,813. A bit of a dip from last year but keep in mind given the reduced amount of international migration over the 3 years and that Americans are not as mobile overall in years past that’s still pretty impressive especially compared to other similar sized metro areas. For 2018 Jax metropolitan area growth for the year ranked 29th in the entire country in percentage increase (out of 383). 

Equally impressive is the sustained growth given that Jacksonville, as the article noted, is the 40th largest metro in the country. The fastest growing metro areas have always been much smaller places like Midland, Texas last year or places like The Villages and St. George, Utah  with populations under 200,000. That puts Jacksonville’s 29,860 increase as the 19th int the country (Dallas was #1 in 2018)

(I was going to show screenshots or the spreadsheet I used to calculate these figures but I haven’t figured out how to post them in this forum. And in case you were curious, the Chicago metropolitan area lost the most losing over 22,000 and Charleston, WV %1.59 reduction was that nation’s highest rate of metro area population loss from 2017 to 2018)

bl8jaxnative

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Re: U.S. metropolitan area 2019 population estimates
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2020, 02:45:24 PM »

I'd be willing to wager that Chicagoland's population losses are going to be bigger in the 2020 census than the 2019 estimate seems to be leading on.  In the past their means of guesstimating #s hasn't dont well with shrinking populations.