Author Topic: Birmingham’s renaissance on display  (Read 1323 times)

thelakelander

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Birmingham’s renaissance on display
« on: March 27, 2020, 01:35:50 PM »
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For a city whose theater district once rivaled that of New York’s, it’s only fitting today that it’s undergoing a second act and the reviews, so far, are glowing.

From its foodie-loving restaurants that have filled once-shuttered storefronts to its green spaces that have breathed new life into rusted railroad tracks, Birmingham makes you want to stay awhile and enjoy its food, culture and history.

In its heyday in the early 20th century, the rapid growth and wealth that resulted from local iron and steel manufacturing earned Birmingham the nickname Magic City. During the Great Depression, growth sputtered and the city never came roaring back to full strength.

But today, things are turning around, with 20th century high rises downtown being renovated into trendy shops, bars, restaurants and tech businesses. But the city still gives a nod to its past.

Full article: https://www.theledger.com/lifestyle/20200326/birminghams-renaissance-on-display
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fieldafm

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Re: Birmingham’s renaissance on display
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2020, 02:00:22 PM »
Birmingham is a nice, quaint little southern town. They've torn down their fair share of stuff, but over the last two decades there has been a strong preservation push.  Last time I was there was two years ago.  Sloss Furnaces and Pepper Place are two cool adaptive reuse projects.

Here is a little more about Pepper Place:

https://www.moderncities.com/article/2016-mar-the-best-weekly-markets-in-the-southeast-page-5

Other higlights from 'Bumingham' are the Streetcar Kolsch from Avondale Brewing, Bearded Lady American wheat from Good People Brewing, dinner at Ovenbird, pizza at Post Office Pies (a restored post office), a pretty kick-@ss auto musuem and the trails of Red Mountain Park.  There are also various public art tributes to civil rights events throughout Downtown... which considering the location, thought was cool.