Author Topic: Snyder Memorial as a Civil Rights History Museum?  (Read 1487 times)

Tacachale

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Re: Snyder Memorial as a Civil Rights History Museum?
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2018, 01:57:46 PM »
As to people leaving Downtown empty after 6pm, they are jumping in their cars because they are going to where they live. People don't want to sit and have a happy hour then drive for 20-30 mins home, ya know? The problem isn't that there aren't places for happy hour downtown, it's that people don't live there.

Fair point, probably a bit of both.

A separate problem, really. If there were more people in the Downtown core (the core core, not spread from Brooklyn to the Southbank) there would be more people and more businesses. But there are sufficient people and workers there and in surrounding neighborhoods to support places at night, whether for happy hour or later.

Just look at music venues. There actually used to be more small music venues a few years ago than there are now. At one point there were at least 3 in the Elbow alone (and the two that closed there didn't do so because there weren't enough customers, but for other reasons.) So another one in a good spot probably wouldn't have trouble staying open, especially with a bar bringing in revenue.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

DrQue

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Re: Snyder Memorial as a Civil Rights History Museum?
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2018, 12:54:26 PM »

Alternate idea:

Take down the racist statue  ;D

Baby steps I suppose.

I wonder how many kids or adults in Jacksonville actually know who A. Philip Randolph was? Or about the Ax Handle Saturday events?

Kids visit downtown for field trips to MOSH, City Hall, the Library etc. This could be another stop that fills an important void.

The picture in this article is pretty powerful (notice the location).
https://myfloridahistory.org/frontiers/article/32