Author Topic: Brightline Train Deaths  (Read 6087 times)

JaxAvondale

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #60 on: March 04, 2018, 09:15:53 PM »

Kiva

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #61 on: March 04, 2018, 09:48:33 PM »
How do they cut the neighborhood in half when they were there before the neighborhood? Why would someone who hates train noise, move near an active mainline railroad? It's like moving next to an airport and then complaining about jet noise.
LOL. We lived in San Marco for years. Train noise is part of living there. It's like living in Okefenokee and complaining about alligators!

Tacachale

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #62 on: March 04, 2018, 10:39:43 PM »
How do they cut the neighborhood in half when they were there before the neighborhood? Why would someone who hates train noise, move near an active mainline railroad? It's like moving next to an airport and then complaining about jet noise.
LOL. We lived in San Marco for years. Train noise is part of living there. It's like living in Okefenokee and complaining about alligators!

Yup!
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acme54321

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #63 on: March 05, 2018, 07:53:42 AM »
People are always going to complain about something.  I live in the San Marco area and hear the train all the time, doesn't bother me.  In fact I don't know anyone who lives in the area that complains about it, because it's always been there.  In fact when my mom comes down she says she likes hearing the train at night because it "makes her feel like she's somewhere that things are happening"  ;D

Steve

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #64 on: March 05, 2018, 09:32:04 AM »
Quote
I don't follow your, "cutting neighborhoods in half" argument. Under this argument San Marco would be destroyed and be an unsafe area.

I owned a house in San Marco for several years.  All of my neighbors without exception hated the train noise.  Folks understand that trains serve a role, however, the amount of train noise over the course of a day for those long freight trains going 5 mph over the St Johns was ridiculous.  Some of those freight trains did take over 10 minutes to snake through San Marco, so yeah they do cut the neighborhood in half, especially when an ambulance is waiting to get someone to one of the several hospitals in San Marco/Southbank.

As lakelander pointed out, unless you moved to the neighborhood before about 1925, then the train as there before you were. If the train bothers you, consider getting a house in the landing path of NAS Jacksonville, and call the Navy about it and complain. Let me know if the Navy returns your call.

For full disclosure - I bought a house in the flight path of NAS Jacksonville. I honestly didn't think about it at the time as I live just south of Bolles of San Jose Blvd. Driving to NAS is about 8-10 miles as you have to go south to the Buckman or north to the Fuller Warren so I didn't think about it. Now, thankfully I actually like the sound of planes but even if I didn't, it was my own fault - the Navy base was there before my house was built!

FloridaBoy

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #65 on: March 05, 2018, 12:55:55 PM »
Quote
I don't follow your, "cutting neighborhoods in half" argument. Under this argument San Marco would be destroyed and be an unsafe area.

I owned a house in San Marco for several years.  All of my neighbors without exception hated the train noise.  Folks understand that trains serve a role, however, the amount of train noise over the course of a day for those long freight trains going 5 mph over the St Johns was ridiculous.  Some of those freight trains did take over 10 minutes to snake through San Marco, so yeah they do cut the neighborhood in half, especially when an ambulance is waiting to get someone to one of the several hospitals in San Marco/Southbank.

As lakelander pointed out, unless you moved to the neighborhood before about 1925, then the train as there before you were. If the train bothers you, consider getting a house in the landing path of NAS Jacksonville, and call the Navy about it and complain. Let me know if the Navy returns your call.

For full disclosure - I bought a house in the flight path of NAS Jacksonville. I honestly didn't think about it at the time as I live just south of Bolles of San Jose Blvd. Driving to NAS is about 8-10 miles as you have to go south to the Buckman or north to the Fuller Warren so I didn't think about it. Now, thankfully I actually like the sound of planes but even if I didn't, it was my own fault - the Navy base was there before my house was built!

True enough.  In the same vein, just saying, "that's the way it's always been, son", isn't good enough for some folks.  They want things not to suck.

thelakelander

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #66 on: March 05, 2018, 01:14:17 PM »
They should sell to people who don't mind train noise and move somewhere further away from the tracks. That's more logical than trying to kill rail traffic and the economic opportunities that are generated by our historic logistics network.
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acme54321

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #67 on: March 05, 2018, 01:48:50 PM »
They should sell to people who don't mind train noise and move somewhere further away from the tracks. That's more logical than trying to kill rail traffic and the economic opportunities that are generated by our historic logistics network.

Trains suck.

Pottsburg

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #68 on: May 15, 2018, 11:00:56 AM »
Brightline begins service to Miami this weekend. Everyone down here in South Florida is super excited. They have been installing exit gates in the downtown areas of the railroad. This basically turns the area into quite zones. The train will only blow the horn if there are workers present, trespassers on the tracks, or they see anything out of the norm. It’s their discretion really. Anyways it makes a big difference and it could be a solution for San Marco. Although you’d have to get the city to pay for the instillation or exit gates. You could probably start around Emerson and Phillips hwy area and do every crossing until the bridge.
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bl8jaxnative

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #69 on: August 18, 2018, 02:41:33 PM »

All of the analogies I've seen here for the trains in San Marco are failures.  There are things we can do to address train noise.  We can improve and even eliminate at-grade crossings of the tracks.  Doing that would enable creating a quiet zone.  The trains still operate, just without waking up people with their horns at 3am.


Pottsburg

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #70 on: August 23, 2018, 08:46:54 AM »

All of the analogies I've seen here for the trains in San Marco are failures.  There are things we can do to address train noise.  We can improve and even eliminate at-grade crossings of the tracks.  Doing that would enable creating a quiet zone.  The trains still operate, just without waking up people with their horns at 3am.
Eliminate an at grade crossing? There are already a limited amount of routes you can take, especially during high traffic times. The best bet is doing a quiet zone study and then it’s up to the city to fork over the money for the upgrade.
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acme54321

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #71 on: August 23, 2018, 10:17:55 AM »

All of the analogies I've seen here for the trains in San Marco are failures.  There are things we can do to address train noise.  We can improve and even eliminate at-grade crossings of the tracks.  Doing that would enable creating a quiet zone.  The trains still operate, just without waking up people with their horns at 3am.
Eliminate an at grade crossing? There are already a limited amount of routes you can take, especially during high traffic times. The best bet is doing a quiet zone study and then it’s up to the city to fork over the money for the upgrade.

Build bridges at every one, duh.

Charles Hunter

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #72 on: August 23, 2018, 11:43:37 AM »

All of the analogies I've seen here for the trains in San Marco are failures.  There are things we can do to address train noise.  We can improve and even eliminate at-grade crossings of the tracks.  Doing that would enable creating a quiet zone.  The trains still operate, just without waking up people with their horns at 3am.
Eliminate an at grade crossing? There are already a limited amount of routes you can take, especially during high traffic times. The best bet is doing a quiet zone study and then it’s up to the city to fork over the money for the upgrade.

Build bridges at every one, duh.

The cost of building overpasses at every RR crossing in San Marco would be prohibitive.  Also, the physical disruption to the neighborhoods and businesses would be significant.  As Pottsburg said, a Quiet Zone Study is the way to go.

From the river to Atlantic Boulevard, there are 5 grade crossings:
Prudential Drive and San Marco Boulevard - due to proximity of the adjacent elevated ramps to the Acosta Bridge, the Baptist Medical complex, and to each other, the engineering of this would be a nightmare.  If it could be done, the cost would be enormous.

Gary Street - closed by the Overland Bridge project

Nira Street and Naldo Avenue - again, these streets intersect adjacent to their RR crossings; with the short block lengths on Nira, it would be difficult to get back to ground before the adjacent streets (Flagler and Hendricks); and putting these huge structures in a residential area probably won't be well received.

Hendricks Avenue - probably the easiest from an engineering standpoint, significant business disruption

Atlantic Boulevard - again, fairly straight-forward engineering; and, again, significant business disruption

With the exception of Hendricks Avenue - which is State Road 13 - all of these are City streets, so Jacksonville would have to come up with the many millions needed

Again, while there is still some not insignificant cost to implementing a Quiet Zone, it is orders of magnitude cheaper than even one overpass.

acme54321

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #73 on: August 23, 2018, 12:30:25 PM »
The cost of building overpasses at every RR crossing in San Marco would be prohibitive.  Also, the physical disruption to the neighborhoods and businesses would be significant.  As Pottsburg said, a Quiet Zone Study is the way to go.

LOL.  Ya don't say....

Pottsburg

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Re: Brightline Train Deaths
« Reply #74 on: August 29, 2018, 09:07:56 AM »
You have to remember, double stack trains are a lot taller.
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