Author Topic: Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets  (Read 3174 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets
« on: February 11, 2016, 03:00:05 AM »

Jax Friend

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Re: Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2016, 07:14:13 AM »
Great article! I'm very happy to see a spotlight focused on this topic. I've been a resident of Springfield for years. I work downtown. I run from my front doorstep over the bridges 4-5 times a week. I encounter State and Union on a constant basis. From an urban planning perspective I believe this is the most contentious issue facing future development of Springfield and Downtown. I also believe it is one of the lowest hanging fruits we could hope for. The problems I see are in general upkeep, missing sidewalk section, overgrown vegetation, flooding, lighting, trash. On a short-term basis fixing those problem would bring a sense of cohesiveness between the two neighborhoods.

In general, it makes more sense to think of State and Union as if the two roads were a freeway. Their purpose is to move far-flung residents across town. As a local I tend to avoid the chaos that can ensue. Multiple grid disruptions make intra-neighborhood travel a sport only local know how to traverse. There is also a vacuum effect created by what is best described as a borderland, void of community and a sense of place. It's a place most Jacksonvillian what to get the hell through as quick as possible. The sad part is that some of the cities most exploitable properties sit and root for lack of interest.

The city or JTA should create a task for to deal with some of the issues created in such a vital area. The pay off could have major implications citywide.

Jumpinjack

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Re: Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2016, 11:42:46 AM »
Agree it is a good article. Worth remembering how beautiful some parts of Jacksonville used to be before they became speedways. I attended a recent FDOT meeting to discuss the changes to these two streets and left discouraged that beyond painting stripes on the asphalt and fixing shrubbery and lights, the help this area needs will not be forthcoming.

Brooklyn is the next neighborhood to disappear as a historic African American walkable community of small homes and businesses. I think we may need a new definition of "progress".

UNFurbanist

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Re: Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2016, 10:11:03 AM »
I think our only hope now would be to pursue the FDOT's recent complete streets initiative for these roads. They are major arteries but they should be made much more friendly to bike and pedestrian traffic to encourage connectivity.

Sandyfeets

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Re: Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2016, 05:57:51 PM »
Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets





Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2016-feb-lost-jacksonville-state-and-union-streets

The church on the left is St. Phillips Episcopal Church and is STILL standing.   

thelakelander

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Re: Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2016, 06:31:27 PM »
Yes. It's one of a handful of old buildings still surviving. It's pretty crazy to see what this corridor looks like now and attempt to imagine what it resembled before being converted into a highway.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Sandyfeets

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Re: Lost Jacksonville: State and Union Streets
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2016, 04:46:42 PM »
One of my grandparents first homes was at 43 W. Union Street, just about across the street from the funeral home.   Sadly, it's covered over by an ugly parking garage.   
All in the name of "Bold New City of the South" and more that I want to say, but have to sit on my fingers to keep from spewing on a public forum.
They moved to Springfield and that house is still standing to this day.