Author Topic: The Walking Revolution  (Read 3506 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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The Walking Revolution
« on: October 15, 2015, 03:00:02 AM »
The Walking Revolution



After 75 years of urban planning that encouraged a sedentary lifestyle, a radical redesign of our cities and open space has finally begun. Parks and pathways are making a comeback to create truly walkable communities through partnerships between local residents, businesses, developers, municipalities, urban planners and health care providers. Is Jacksonville ready to join the revolution?

Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2015-oct-the-walking-revolution

gerschea@gmail.com

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Re: The Walking Revolution
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2015, 03:45:22 PM »
Giving everyone 55 different freeway options to get/live further and further from the city/downtown area is not a great place to start......

Redbaron616

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Re: The Walking Revolution
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2015, 12:56:02 AM »
Let's face what helped destroy cities. The forced busing of children from one neighborhood over to another simply to make the racial numbers "correct". No matter if the school next door was a better school. This wasn't about education; it was about political outcomes. So many city residents voted with their feet and moved far enough away that any school their child was bused to would be much better academically.

Funny that we believe market economies work best but when it comes to education, the accepted logic is that government monopoly is best. Vouchers are the answer to making the monopoly either respond to market forces or cease to exist. When students can get a high school diploma and not even begin to read at an 8th grade level and no one is fired, that is a monopoly in action. In a market economy, parents would have to option of sending their child to the best school in their opinion, not just some random decision by the bureaucrats. Of course, school administration types will fight this kind of freedom to the death. They want your child forced to go where they say and learn or not learn what they also determine without any responsibility on their part.

Adam White

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Re: The Walking Revolution
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2015, 01:51:11 PM »
Let's face what helped destroy cities. The forced busing of children from one neighborhood over to another simply to make the racial numbers "correct". No matter if the school next door was a better school. This wasn't about education; it was about political outcomes. So many city residents voted with their feet and moved far enough away that any school their child was bused to would be much better academically.

Funny that we believe market economies work best but when it comes to education, the accepted logic is that government monopoly is best. Vouchers are the answer to making the monopoly either respond to market forces or cease to exist. When students can get a high school diploma and not even begin to read at an 8th grade level and no one is fired, that is a monopoly in action. In a market economy, parents would have to option of sending their child to the best school in their opinion, not just some random decision by the bureaucrats. Of course, school administration types will fight this kind of freedom to the death. They want your child forced to go where they say and learn or not learn what they also determine without any responsibility on their part.

One might as well read the words to jabberwocky as this nonsense.

Are you sure it wasn't gravitational waves caused by liberal people having such heavy intellects?  Ive heard that that sometimes disrupts the maintenance of infrastructure when cities build suburbs that they can't pay for.

Yeah, that's a new one. Busing caused the decline of cities? Who knew?

I guess it's more fair to let rich people send their kids to the best schools and let poor people suffer than to try and make sure all schools are good schools.
“If you're going to play it out of tune, then play it out of tune properly.”

TimmyB

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Re: The Walking Revolution
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2015, 01:57:32 PM »
Let's face what helped destroy cities. The forced busing of children from one neighborhood over to another simply to make the racial numbers "correct". No matter if the school next door was a better school. This wasn't about education; it was about political outcomes. So many city residents voted with their feet and moved far enough away that any school their child was bused to would be much better academically.

Funny that we believe market economies work best but when it comes to education, the accepted logic is that government monopoly is best. Vouchers are the answer to making the monopoly either respond to market forces or cease to exist. When students can get a high school diploma and not even begin to read at an 8th grade level and no one is fired, that is a monopoly in action. In a market economy, parents would have to option of sending their child to the best school in their opinion, not just some random decision by the bureaucrats. Of course, school administration types will fight this kind of freedom to the death. They want your child forced to go where they say and learn or not learn what they also determine without any responsibility on their part.

Is your argument about why the suburbs boomed during the 60's and 70's due to racial-political issues?  If so, it veered horribly, and even further off-topic, as you began ranting about the "failing" educational system and how vouchers would "fix" that "failure".

Overstreet

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Re: The Walking Revolution
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2015, 12:50:32 PM »
Suburbs got their foot hold because of the GI bill of rights after WWII. VA loans made individual home ownership possible for thousands of returning vets. FHA loans did similar things for non-vets.

You can whine about it or just concentrate on the future and do what you can do.