Author Topic: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership  (Read 3249 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« on: September 25, 2015, 03:00:03 AM »
Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership



If you believe no one rides the Jacksonville's Skyway, you may find yourself surprised at its ranking when compared to its peers. This weekday ridership list of Florida's rail transit systems suggests that success or failure is not totally based on traditional density and urban area population statistics.

Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2015-sep-floridas-rail-systems-by-weekday-ridership

spuwho

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2015, 08:01:43 AM »
Skyway ranks 4th, but is a huge drop from 3rd place Tri Rail volumes, almost a third less.

Miami's total transit volumes dwarfs everyone else.

But I am surprised that we are ahead of SunRail in Orlando.

thelakelander

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2015, 08:44:36 AM »
^That's true. However, imagine if the Skyway actually went somewhere? If it were 5 or 6 miles, which is more than enough to tie in nearby neighborhoods like San Marco, Brooklyn, Riverside Avenue, etc., that 5k would easily double. At that length, it could include the sports district too. If it had higher capacity rolling stock, major events at Everbank Field and the other venues would have the same impact American Airlines Arena has had on Metromover. What about if we actually coordinated our land use policy with it to stimulate TOD development? When I see what we haven't done or connected it into, how small the system is compared to the others, and how many people still ride it, I see lots of potential in its ability to be a major component of the urban core's revitalization.

Systems ranked in terms of length:

1. Tri-Rail (Miami) - 70.9 miles
2. Sunrail (Orlando) - 31.7 miles
3. Metrorail (Miami) - 24.4 miles
4. Metromover (Miami) - 4.4 miles
5. TECO Line Streetcar (Tampa) - 2.7 miles
6. JTA Skyway (Jacksonville) - 2.5 miles
« Last Edit: September 25, 2015, 08:50:51 AM by thelakelander »
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Tacachale

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2015, 10:17:42 AM »
I'm not surprised the Skyway is ahead of Sunrail from talking to friends from Orlando. They consistently say it's flawed. I guess that's the risk of running commuter rail without a good way to get around at some of the stations. Also, if you think the Skyway was expensive, jeez. I still think it may pay off in TOD and ridership may increase as they add better stops, and improve local transit so you can get around once you're at your stop.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

thelakelander

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2015, 12:18:13 PM »
Like the Skyway, Sunrail only runs on weekdays. Sunrail operates from 5:06am to 11:23pm. The Skyway operates from 6am to 9pm.

The reason why the Skyway has higher ridership is service frequency. Sunrail trains run every 30 minutes peak and 2.5 hours off-peak. Skyway trains come every 3 minutes peak and 3-6 minutes off-peak.

For those who can use the Skyway's limited route, you can count on a train arriving at any moment, no matter what time you show up to your station during operating hours. On the other hand, you have to plan your day around Sunrail's limited schedule. Miss a departing train by 10 seconds and you'll have to wait 30 minutes to 2.5 hours for the next. That's not a good transit rider incentive.
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Redbaron616

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2015, 05:54:45 AM »
And all of them are subsidized by taxpayers who never use them.

thelakelander

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2015, 07:57:31 AM »
^So are the roads and airports, which are subsidized on a much larger scale.
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ProjectMaximus

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2015, 11:03:28 AM »
And all of them are subsidized by taxpayers who never use them.

I would support a 100% user-funded mobility network. Not sure if you would.

Ocklawaha

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Re: Florida's Rail Systems by Weekday Ridership
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2015, 05:36:19 PM »
And all of them are subsidized by taxpayers who never use them.

You mean like the road in front of your house that I help pay for but never use? Mass Transit isn't about taking money away from 'FREEways' it's about giving citizens options. Roadways move cars and Transit moves people.