Author Topic: Video: Now This Is How To Design A Street!  (Read 2137 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Video: Now This Is How To Design A Street!
« on: January 12, 2015, 10:25:02 PM »
Video: Now This Is How To Design A Street!



Some people believe protected cycle paths along side a road and driveways do not go together well. This video shows that it is all a matter of design. As long as it is perfectly clear that cars on such a driveway have to give priority to cyclists there is no problem at all.

Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2015-jan-video-now-this-is-how-to-design-a-street

Redbaron616

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Re: Video: Now This Is How To Design A Street!
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2015, 07:21:48 PM »
Let's not forget all the unlucky homeowners whose part of their front yards is seized in order to build the bike lanes.

thelakelander

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Re: Video: Now This Is How To Design A Street!
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2015, 08:37:19 PM »
No need to do that. Our roads and the ROW their built on happen to be a lot wider than they need to be. All we need is updated roadway design standards.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

southsider1015

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Re: Video: Now This Is How To Design A Street!
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2015, 10:18:49 PM »
No need to do that. Our roads and the ROW their built on happen to be a lot wider than they need to be. All we need is updated roadway design standards.

I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on update typical sections, ROW widths, and other details that you believe need updating.

thelakelander

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Re: Video: Now This Is How To Design A Street!
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2015, 09:32:32 AM »
They aren't anything ground breaking. Just a bit on integrating a little common sense with slowing vehicle speeds down in certain environments and better separating motorized and non-motorized traffic in others. Then in both cases, better integrating transportation infrastructure with land use policy.

So for example, FDOT now allows lane widths of 10.5' - 11' in certain situations. That's a great thing for slowing traffic down through certain built environments. COJ, should consider doing the same. Another example, would be embracing multi-modal connectivity in built environments, regardless of if the project is a roadway resurfacing job, maintenance or new capacity project. This means incorporating physically separated shared use path facilities with projects like the Fuller Warren Bridge expansion or the First Coast Expressway. Last, there's an issue of safety. A stripe of paint  being the only thing separating bicyclists from 50mph traffic on a 6 - 8 lane highway or a 5' sidewalk with no shade trees aren't the most ideal solutions for those modes. Once auto/truck maximum speed limits are allowed to exceed a certain number, effort should be taken to physically separate these modes to the highest extent as possible.

Oh, and one more. Many of our urban core streets are much wider than they have to be. Some, like Park Street or Edgewood Avenue, would be prefect for lane diets to create space within the existing curb & gutter for other uses.

Beach Boulevard

Bad solution for bike lanes. Too much auto traffic, traveling at high speeds.

Beach Boulevard

So despite bike lanes, the average person will ride on the narrow 5' sidewalk. However, this creates a dangerous condition for pedestrians. Oh, by the way, the bus stop in the image isn't ADA accessible either. It would suck to be confined to a wheel chair and having to use this stop.


Better

SR 347 - Hauppauge (Long Island), NY

Better off (in the design stage) taking that extra 8' of dedicated bicycle lane and going with a shared use path for both bike and ped traffic.

Pace Road - Lakeland, FL

Even in suburban situations, some communities have changed their local design standards to better separate bike traffic from facilities designed for significant auto traffic and speeds.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali