Author Topic: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville  (Read 8915 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« on: November 10, 2014, 11:45:02 PM »
A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville



Over the last century, Jacksonville has been the home of several interesting characters and residents who operated on the other side of the law.  Here's at a few from Jacksonville's notorious past.

Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2014-nov-a-century-of-murder-mayhem-and-fraud-in-jacksonville

peestandingup

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2014, 02:44:07 AM »
It's very likely Toole didn't kill Adam Walsh. He was def a murderer, but from what I understand his stories about Adam varied wildly & there were tons of inconsistencies. And since the cops were stupid enough to lose all the evidence (seriously, a whole fucking car?), then they'll likely never really know.

I got interested in this scumbag a couple years ago after John Walsh announced that in the news that they were closing Adam's case & naming Toole the killer, which seemed more like just for closure rather than factual based.

thelakelander

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2014, 07:03:01 AM »
The Ashley Gang was said to have the characteristics of a mix of Jessie James sprinkled in with Al Capone. While the gang was associated with Stuart, FL, they had strong Jacksonville ties.



John Ashley's girlfriend, Laura Upthegrove, also known as the Queen of the Everglades, spent time in a Jacksonville prison after most of the gang was killed by police in 1924. Police had been tipped that Ashley's sister (Daisy Ashley) lived on Gilmore Street in Riverside and that they gang was headed to her house to hideout.


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Serving some jail time in a Jacksonville jail in March 1927. Release and worked a gas station with her mother near Okeechobee (Upthegrove Beach / Sand Cut). She killed herself with a toxin liquid (Lysol) on Aug. 10, 1927 during an arugment with a customer,(she was age 30).
During August 1927, O.B. Padgett's brother E.P. (Elza) Padgett was down for a visitin So. Fl from his home in Perry. Elza was riding with Deputy Sheriff Brownlee over to Lake Okeechobee when they visited Laura Upthegrove over this disturbance. After Laura drank some poison, Elza Padgett grabbed her to get her to a bed. Laura died in Elza's arms.

During her time in the Jax prison, she sparked the pea farm cabbage riot after being sentenced 30 days for being drunk and uppity. Five days into her sentence, she started the riot over too much cabbage being on the menu.  To diffuse the situation, prison officials tear-gassed the women, threw her into solitary and served more cabbage. The Ashley gang's Clarence Middleton was also from Jacksonville:

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More than eight decades after he and his crime partners died in 1929, John Ashley continues to be one of the most intriguing figures in Florida history.

Many a relative of an Ashley Gang member has written to defend, or at least try to explain, the long-dead gangster.

Clyde Middleton wrote in January to tell us of his uncle, Clarence Middleton. “He was the second oldest son of Steven and Margeret Middleton, my grandparents. He had four brothers and three sisters living in Jacksonville; all are deceased now.

“His oldest brother, Jack, owned the Embassy Club and the Peacock Club in Jacksonville.

“Cecil, Clyde and Bruce all served honorably in World War II and became successful businessmen in Jacksonville after the war.

“Clarence probably got involved in rum running in the early ’20s and met up with some of the Ashley Gang in prison then fell in with them.

“He was one of the four men murdered on the San Sebastian bridge in 1924. He is buried beside his father in Jacksonville.”  Clyde refers, of course, to the evening of Nov. 1, 1924.

Deputies stopped Ashley and Middleton, along with Hanford Mobley and Ray “Shorty” Lynn, on a wooden bridge over the St. Sebastian River in what was then St. Lucie County.

They later said the men were shot trying to escape. But many believed they were assassinated by lawmen tired of being humiliated from Stuart to Miami by robberies, moonshining and murder.

In 1997, Ada Coats Williams, a retired teacher of creative writing at Fort Pierce’s Indian River State College, completed Florida’s Ashley Gang, the first book on the Ashleys since 1928.

A retired deputy who’d been on the bridge that night had confirmed to her in the 1950s that the men were shot while handcuffed, after John made a sudden move.

He had told her on the condition that she keep the secret until after all those involved had died.
http://www.historicpalmbeach.com/tag/ashley-gang/
http://history.jupiter.fl.us/History/Ashley_Gang.cfm
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Ocklawaha

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2014, 04:53:11 PM »
Let's not forget that Al Capone and his... um... mistress Jean Harlow, were regular's in Jacksonville and spent a good deal of time in a hotel room at the Casa Marina.


John Wesley Hardin
In a saloon on election night in November 1876, Hardin and a companion, Jacksonville policeman Gus Kennedy, were involved in a gunfight with Mobile, Alabama, policemen in which one person was wounded and two killed. He further claims that he and Kennedy were arrested and later released.

Hardin knew he could not return home. As a fugitive, he initially traveled with outlaw Frank Polk in the Pisgah, Navarro County, Texas area. Polk had killed a man named Tom Brady, and a detachment of soldiers sent from Corsicana, Texas pursued the duo. Hardin escaped the troops, but Polk was captured. Hardin also briefly taught school in Pisgah. While there, he claimed he shot a man's eye out to win a bottle of whiskey in a bet.

Later that month, on January 20, in Horn Hill, Limestone County, Texas, Hardin claimed he killed a man in a gunfight after an argument at the circus. Less than a week after this incident, in nearby Kosse, Hardin was accompanying a saloon girl home when they were accosted by her pimp, who demanded money. Hardin threw money on the ground and shot the would-be thief when he bent over to pick it up

While driving cattle on the Chisholm Trail to Abilene, Kansas in the summer of 1871, Hardin is reputed to have fought Mexican vaqueros and cattle rustlers. Towards the end of the drive, a Mexican herd crowded in behind Hardin's and there was some trouble keeping the two herds apart. Hardin exchanged words with the man in charge of the other herd; both men were on horseback. The Mexican fired his gun at Hardin, putting a hole through Hardin's hat. Hardin found that his own weapon, a worn-out cap-and-ball pistol with a loose cylinder, would not fire; he dismounted and managed to discharge the gun by steadying the cylinder with one hand and pulling the trigger with the other. He hit the Mexican in the thigh. A truce was declared and both parties went their separate ways. However, Hardin borrowed a pistol from a friend and went looking for the Mexican, this time fatally shooting him through the head. A firefight between the rival camps ensued. Hardin claimed six vaqueros died in the exchanges (five of them reportedly shot by him).

"A man was killed in his bed at a hotel in Abilene, Monday night, by a desperado called "Arkansas". The murderer escaped. This was his sixth murder."The incident earned Hardin notoriety in the Old West pantheon as a man "so mean, he once shot a man for snoring". Years later, Hardin made a casual reference to the episode: "They tell lots of lies about me," he complained. "They say I killed six or seven men for snoring. Well, it ain't true. I only killed one man for snoring."

Hardin owned and operated a (appropriately enough) a butcher shop on Bay Street downtown, he married and raised a family back and forth between JAX and GVL, using his occasional visits 'back east' to enforce the relationship.

He was forty years old when he returned to Gonzales, Texas. Later that year, on March 16, Hardin was pardoned, and, on July 21, he passed the state's bar examination, obtaining his license to practice law. According to a newspaper article in 1900, shortly after being released from prison, Hardin committed negligent homicide when he made a $5 bet that he could "at the first shot" knock a Mexican man off the soap box on which he was "sunning" himself, winning the bet and leaving the man dead from the fall and not the gunshot.


The heart of the Karpis-Barker Gang
Although not as well known as their contemporaries the Dillinger Gang, or the Barrow Gang, the Barker-Karpis Gang was perhaps more ruthless, not only committing bank robberies but extending the activities into kidnapping as well. It is best known for the myth that it was run by the Barker brothers' mother, Kate, usually referred to as "Ma Barker". The Barker-Karpis Gang was one of the longest-lived criminal gangs during the Depression Era, spanning from 1931 to 1935. Founded by Fred Barker and Alvin Karpis, it was later joined by Fred's brother Arthur "Doc" Barker. Along with the three core members, the gang's network spanned up to 25 members at one point.

Following the declaration of Alvin Karpis as Public Enemy No. 1, Doc Barker was arrested on January 8, 1935, along with Byron Bolton. Russel "Slim Gray" Gibson was killed resisting the arrest. Along with his arrest came a map and letters to a cottage near Lake Weir, Florida, near Ocklawaha, in which Fred Barker and his mother, Kate "Ma" Barker were hiding under an assumed name. The Jacksonville office of the FBI tracked them down after a report that some damn fools were shooting alligators with a machine gun! After a four hour shootout on January 16, 1935, Fred and Ma Barker were killed. Controversy remains as to whether Ma Barker participated in the shootout


Of course our most infamous 'bad guy' was John Dillinger who hung out at the Casa Marina Hotel at Jacksonville Beach. He purchased a fast Buick automobile here which the TU found out about and immediately sent a photographer out to photograph Dillingers new car. He also had an apartment and dentist in nearby Daytona Beach which was tracked from the Jacksonville office of the FBI. Dilingers affair with actress Jean Harlow took place in 'their room' at the Casa Marina.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2014, 04:55:15 PM by Ocklawaha »

Know Growth

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2014, 09:09:49 PM »

Subject matter hits home so to speak. Kinda' "Real".

Having moved from Miami to Clay County in the 1970's,as events unfolded, I would become inextricably involved in a Blanding Blvd. Land Use/Rezone episode....a phone call in the night......a gruff voice on the other end..... "I want to see the whites of your eyes, boy!"
Reverend Percy Knight. Knight Boxx Rd et al.

Noone

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2014, 04:41:56 AM »
100 years later Jacksonville's Shipyards $36,500,000 taxpayer money gone.
A midnight email by a college Prez for an Extra, Extra $500,000 then voted on by a board that day.
Palms Fish Camp- Million dollar plus gumbo to be served up and you never even open the door.
A land locked Public School to be unlocked for the right Cha Ching!
A 900' shortened Downtown Riverwalk.
Baltimore guys sent packing because they were two butts short. Fraud of the Executive branch circumventing the Legislative branch.
Visit Jacksonville today!

Bill Ectric

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2014, 12:11:14 PM »
I enjoy reading these kind of true stories of crime and malfescence. Keep up the good work!

Know Growth

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2014, 08:19:10 PM »
100 years later Jacksonville's Shipyards $36,500,000 taxpayer money gone.
Visit Jacksonville today!


  Delaney era Mayhem,if not in fact certified Fraud.City council/attorney- endless loop.Shipwreck players/layers even connected to Cecil Field/Brannon Chaffee/BELTWAY. Yea!

  At one point I had key ShipYards et al players on a 54 Hatteras Yacht (owned by Tim Mann;Swisher)- we were touring Downtown.......passengers included my father in law,"Judge" Bill Durden,former City of Consolidated Jacksonville Chief General Counsel.
  Select others on board were about ready to jump overboard when I walked from the bow to the stern,trapping them.
  At least one should have gone over board.   I am such a Sissy. As if a Carl Hiaasen scenario,close on the heels of Carl's  "real life" 'Jacksonville's Millionth Mania' editorial.

  Yes, by the Grace Of A Particular Southern Conservative Jacksonville God the Shipwreck Yards property ended up back in Public property domain- "We" own it right now......
what next?
  The next best Central Park?

  "Visit Jacksonville's Downtown Jacksonville Riverfront Public Lands"
   2014....100 acres +/-  North & South bank
            Dandy "Corridor"

                                     Jacksonville's Gracious Southern Front Porch

 (No $$ charge for this independent Planner & Consult,Insult "vision"- the Transformation of the State Road 21/Blanding Corridor was "Easy" and more Predictable,in comparison.And no direct personal threats since Clay County matters. That was Easy! Onward! MW)

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« Last Edit: November 14, 2014, 09:54:59 PM by Know Growth »

peestandingup

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Re: A Century of Murder, Mayhem, and Fraud in Jacksonville
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2014, 11:06:02 PM »
Soo..are Noone & Know Growth the same spammy person?