Author Topic: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?  (Read 2658 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« on: July 11, 2014, 03:00:01 AM »
So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?



Considering it's hurricane season, Metro Jacksonville shares a Global Data Vault  infographic featuring data provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2014-jul-so-what-do-you-know-about-hurricanes

Noone

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Re: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2014, 06:20:05 AM »
Thanks for the information.

Ocklawaha

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Re: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2014, 09:13:31 AM »
Anyone that lived through huricane's Dora and Donna as I did, can tell you this is deadly serious. Anyone convinced of the old Jacksonville myth that we are somehow 'immune to hurricanes,' is a damned fool. And consider that, you and your family could be damned in a most literal sense.

The record speaks for itself, and when the El Nino is in the right place, we will catch hell. Check this out:

1871-2bdts,1874bdts,1877bdtsbr, 1878bd,
1879bdts,1880-2bdts,1882bdts,1885,1885bdts,1885bdtsbr,1886bdts,1888bd,1889tsbd,1893bdtsbr,1893-2, 1894bd
1896bd,1898,1900tsbd,1906ts,1907bdtsbr,1910bdts,1914ts,1915ts,1916bdts,1926ts,1928b

(br)=brush (ts)=Tropical Storm (bd)=Back Door,meaning coming from over land from opposite coast.Not all names are noted,also storms before 1950 were not named.Not every stat on every storm description is given.(since 1871)

Tropical Storm to Hurricane ratio
TS=42, 73.68% H=15, 26.32% 7.7% were considered 'deadly.'

Average years between direct hurricane hits.(hurricane winds for at least a few hours)
(12h)once every 11.83 years

Average MPH of hurricane hits. (based on advisories sustained winds, not gusts)
103mph

Statistically when this area should be affected next
affected by TS Andrea in 2013

This areas hurricane past
1878 Sept 11th,strengthening to a hurricane while moving away with 85mph winds, press 29.19 (hurdat)
1885 Aug 24th, a cat 2 hurricane moving north while just east with 105mph winds
1888 oct 11th 80mph from the SW
1893 Aug 27th,115mph just off shore while moving north.Distance from downtown Jacksonville of 38 nm yields a central pressure of 943.5 mb at the stormís closest point of approach to Jacksonville. Damage reports from the 1893 hurricane are very similar to damage sustained in Hurricane Floyd in 1999 and it appears the 1893 event was a similar storm for those areas.
1893, Oct 13th ,120mph just offshore while moving north
1894 sept 26th a hurricane from the SSW heavy damage to crops & homes passes just south & southeast with 80mph winds
1896 Sept 29th a very fast moving hurricane from the gulf of Mexico SSW passes 49 miles west with 110mph winds causing heavy damage.
1898 Oct 2nd a major hurricane with 130mph winds moves into the Georgia N Florida border coming from the SE.
1928 sept 17, 90mph from the south just west
1960 Sept 11th, hurricane Donna hits from the S.W passing just east with 105mph winds
1964 Dora sept 10th 115mph winds just south by 30 miles from the east 3 killed 230mill in damage area battered by hurricane force winds for 15 hrs,heavy damage here. N.E winds @ 85mph observedNewspaper headline
1979 sept 4th from the SSE,David passes by just offshore by 40miles arguably a brush with 95mph winds

OCK: certified NWS Storm Spotter, experience OKLAHOMA, yes, one of those crazy nuts that chase tornadoes... Bottom line? If you see me running, GET THE HELL OUTTA MY WAY. ;)

acme54321

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Re: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2014, 10:41:54 AM »
Something seems a little off with the data on Georgia

David

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Re: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2014, 01:29:05 PM »
Do you ever chase hurricanes Ock?

We have been getting lucky these past few decades in terms of not taking a direct hit from a strong one, but all of those close calls prompted me to chase a few storms to get the full experience.

In August of 2004 I decided to go after Charley. I was 25 at the time and knew very little about the true power of a hurricane. I just wanted to experience one. Foolishly, I drove my car down the backroads to Orlando and encountered a few gust, but then, while driving in a heavily forested neighborhood the winds really started to pick up. Power lines started coming down, tree branches were hitting the road. I knew I was in trouble.

I headed out of the neighborhood and for I-4. The traffic lights were blowing back and forth, the winds were probably at 50-60 mph at that point. I outran the storm on I-4 and took shelter in a Daytona Beach hotel.

I had outran the storm by an hour or so and the winds hadn’t quite picked up in Daytona beach. I parked my car in an elevated parking garage and headed into the hotel. Half an hour later the winds started picking up, a few more after that the power went out. But People were still treating it like a “fun” storm, they were out in the street kicking water around, enjoying the breeze.

A short while later, the winds really started picking up again, 60mph..70mph, 80. In the hotel there was this exit door that lead to the oceanside. It had this eerie whistle sound coming from it, that grew louder as the wind speed increased. I moseyed over to see the ocean, which was raging but because the storm was coming from the southwest, the ocean didn’t encroach any further. No storm surge. The whistling from the door grew louder and louder so I finally backed away. I retreated back to the main lobby of the hotel, which had this chandelier that started to sway above the spiral staircase.

Then when I thought the howling/whistling sound couldn’t get any louder, it ramped up another notch. There were no longer people outside playing in the street, everyone was hunkered down in the hotel restaurant, the lobby, underneath the staircase. The whistling sound reached what seemed to be its breaking point, then the windows in the lobby finally gave in..the chandelier was getting knocked around by the hurricane force gust and swayed back and forth a few times before collapsing to the ground.

People were scared, mothers were calling for their children and we all gathered in a sturdy enclosed room in the middle of the hotel. A few more intense squalls rolled through but as the eye passed over and the other side of the storm hit the intensity dropped off substantially.

When it was safe to go outside we surveyed the area and saw a ton of car windows blown out, signs knocked over, entire store fronts demolished. The hotel's upper floors had structural failure, the walls had been blown open and the rooms were exposed to the outside.  The “Daytona Beach welcomes you” sign had been blown out as well.

All in all, it was a very brief experience, only a few hours. And there was some substantial damage, but it wasn’t devastating. That was because Hurricane Charley had lost most of its punch from trekking across the state. It was a weak cat 2, strong cat 1 at best by the time it reached Daytona. A good “starter hurricane chase” if you will.

I drove home to Jacksonville, which looked completely untouched by the storm that had just exited the state  90 miles to the south.  Charley was a very compact storm, didn’t have the same coverage that Francis and Jeanne did, but it packed quite a punch.

Later that year I did chase Francis and Jeanne. Francis lacked the intensity I felt with Charley. Felt slow moving and sloppy. Jeanne on the other hand was the strongest one I’ve ever experienced. It was so intense it and lasted for so long I stayed in my shelter for at least 6 hours before I felt it was safe to go outside again.  Storm surge kept me trapped in Vero beach for another 12 hours, where I passed the time by helping the locals clean up, who were mostly elderly. (turns out I rode out that storm in a retirement condo, which looked like a hotel to me at first. )

When Katrina hit in 2005 and I saw the intensity on the radar maps, I didn’t even attempt to chase that one.  All of the previous storms had given me enough respect to avoid it. That and fear of the bridges being washed out and being stuck 500 miles from home.

It’s one thing to chase these storms then return home to your city in one piece. It’s another for a cat 3 or higher to hit your hometown. I’m hoping Jacksonville continues its lucky streak because all of  that curiosity and wonder of a hurricane’s power I had at 25 has turned into cautiousness by now. Especially after seeing Jeanne. Those outer bands &  tropical storms that we get mainly in Jax aren’t quite the same as the eye wall of a hurricane which makes you hope that the structure you’re in doesn’t give way.



« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 11:26:39 PM by David »

Ocklawaha

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Re: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2014, 09:33:41 AM »

Hurricane Donna... Yeah it HIT Jacksonville.

Just don't get too comfortable with the statement.
Quote
"Especially after seeing Jeanne. Those outer bands &  tropical storms that we get mainly in Jax aren’t quite the same as the eye wall of a hurricane which makes you hope that the structure you’re in doesn’t give way."

David

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Re: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2014, 11:33:15 AM »
Nothing has hit us in recent memory, so that creates the complacency. Jax residents under 45 has gone their whole lives without experiencing sustained hurricane force winds in the area.   Floyd was the last good test we had for evacuating and that was a nightmare. Hopefully we're better prepared with the reverse lanes on the evacuation routes next time we're facing the possibility of Category 3 or higher making landfall in NE Florida. 

David

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Re: So What Do You Know About Hurricanes?
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2014, 11:40:14 AM »
Well, I take back the no hurricane force winds comment in 45 years, seeing how close Hurricane David came to our coast. I was about 9 months old back then, so my memory's a little fuzzy!