Author Topic: Jacksonville is the "City of Parks"  (Read 2808 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Jacksonville is the "City of Parks"
« on: May 10, 2014, 03:00:01 AM »
Jacksonville is the "City of Parks"



Richard G. Skinner III, a recent discussion leader for TEDxJacksonville, writes about embracing, promoting and expanding Jacksonville as the "City of Parks".

Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2014-may-jacksonville-is-the-city-of-parks

Noone

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Re: Jacksonville is the
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2014, 05:40:14 AM »
WOW!
Guiliford wasn't the only one that said that at One Spark and Welcome to Actionville.
Let's connect our Parks but it won't happen from Downtown in our new CRA/DIA super duper restricted (Food Truck, Kayak) zone from the Fuller Warren Bridge to the Mathews bridge on our St. Johns River our American Heritage River a FEDERAL Initiative.
"City of Parks"
"City of Winners and Losers"
Visit Jacksonville!

thelakelander

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Re: Jacksonville is the
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2014, 08:14:20 AM »
Right now, we have the "largest" park system in the country because we're consolidated with Duval County, making us the largest city by land area in the continental US. If we really want to become a city of parks (like many view Minneapolis today), we're going to have to address, dramatically enhance and expand the urban park system inside of the I-295 beltway.
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simms3

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Re: Jacksonville is the
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2014, 02:07:46 PM »
Jacksonville: City of Parks?  I'm not seeing it.

Also, why don't the Skinners put their money where their mouth is and create an endowment to create and maintain a nice city park?  That's what rich people in other cities do, and why almost every major city has far superior parks than Jax.  Preservation land?  Ok, who cares.  Timucuan Preserve is nice, but why preserve pine forest on the west side?  Developers aren't itching to build on it any time soon and it's pine forest.  I'm so cynical when it comes to Jacksonville's parks because people and city officials like to brag about absolute crap when it comes to the parks and nobody is really doing anything about it.

The original riverwalk was largely funded by a brick sale, so private dollars.  Why does anyone think it's somehow different going forward when it comes to nice parks?  Piedmont Park in Atlanta has something like a $100+M endowment, or at least that's what's been privately invested to improve it over the past ~5-7 years.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2014, 02:11:20 PM by simms3 »
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IrvAdams

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Re: Jacksonville is the \
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2014, 02:23:01 PM »
The Timucuan Preserve area is great, has miles of trails for walking or trail biking, and great views along a very high bluff on the river. It can be accessed by boat or kayak also. There are huge, old shell mounds from the original Indian tribes who harvested fresh oysters from the river over 500 years ago. This preserve is on both sides of the river, but on the south side it is off Mt. Pleasant Road and is known as the Theodore Roosevelt Area. It's a must see, and is not advertised much locally.
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Scrub Palmetto

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Re: Jacksonville is the
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2014, 05:07:47 PM »
Preservation land?  Ok, who cares.  Timucuan Preserve is nice, but why preserve pine forest on the west side?

I care. And that land on the Westside is not just a single ecosystem.

I absolutely love spending time in Jenning State Forest. It is an eden of escape that I can't imagine the Westside without. Both it and Cary State Forest have some excellent trails, a wide variety of ecosystems, and Jennings has some lovely hills and ravines. And this isn't the opinion of an untraveled yokel. I've hiked in just about every region of the country, and in Canada.

I know and respect the value of Florida's natural environments very well, something instilled in me by my family. I'm at least a 7th generation Floridian, and the first to be born and raised in the city. 3 previous generations were still living by the time I was an adult, and I was close to all of them. I feel very lucky to have been able to grow up in Jax while still spending a great deal of time in the state's rural and natural environments. The relationship between these and the urban environment is something I'm passionate about.

Florida's ecosystems are absolutely fascinating. They're rich and varied like few other places in the country, with dramatic changes from one to the other in short distances, responding to subtle variations in elevation, soil, water, and drainage conditions. And this applies as much far inland as it does along the coast. Much of the Westside was deforested in the past and turned into pine plantations, but there is much more to its natural state than that -- much of which still exists and is worth preserving.

Ocklawaha

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Re: Jacksonville is the
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2014, 02:44:56 PM »
Jacksonville: City of Parks?  I'm not seeing it.

Also, why don't the Skinners put their money where their mouth is and create an endowment to create and maintain a nice city park?  That's what rich people in other cities do, and why almost every major city has far superior parks than Jax.  Preservation land?  Ok, who cares.  Timucuan Preserve is nice, but why preserve pine forest on the west side?  Developers aren't itching to build on it any time soon and it's pine forest.  I'm so cynical when it comes to Jacksonville's parks because people and city officials like to brag about absolute crap when it comes to the parks and nobody is really doing anything about it.















"Ok, who cares.  Timucuan Preserve is nice, but why preserve pine forest on the west side?"

This says volumes about your frequent commentaries on MJ, granted Jennings and Cary are not Kings Canyon, Yosemite or Yellowstone, but some of us would argue while its only 27,408 acres, its just as grand, beautiful and alluring as any of those. City of Parks holds real promise provided we furnish them and maintain them to top notch standards, something we've admittedly failed to do with our public spaces and infrastructure.

I'm with you Scrub Palmetto, Not a untraveled yokel, I've traveled and worked from Patagonia to Canada and from Atlantic to Pacific... guess what? I'm here!
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 02:48:01 PM by Ocklawaha »

mbwright

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Re: Jacksonville is the
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2014, 09:29:27 AM »
The more, and larger areas that are preserved, the better.  You can't have small areas, and have a successful environment.

Bativac

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Re: Jacksonville is the \
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2014, 11:37:39 AM »
I do hear people complain a lot about Jacksonville's parks but it's one of the few parts of this city I genuinely enjoy. I've lived here almost my entire life and there are still parks I haven't visited (and parts of parks I have visited that I haven't explored).

No, they are not all well-landscaped... or even maintained beyond an occasional mowing. But there are lots of fantastic wide-open green spaces perfect for any kind of outdoor activity you can think of, and a variety of terrain and ecosystems.

I'm confused by Simms's comment of: "developers aren't itching to build on it anytime soon" regarding preserved land. So should we only act to preserve green space when development is encroaching?