Author Topic: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History  (Read 6223 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« on: February 26, 2014, 03:00:01 AM »
10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History



In honor of Black History Month, here are ten facts about Jacksonville's African-American history that you might not be aware of.

Read More: http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2014-feb-10-facts-about-jacksonvilles-black-history

Noone

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2014, 03:18:30 AM »
Thanks for the history.

chluke

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2014, 05:05:31 AM »
Again, thanks for the history and showing the role we played in Jacksonville.

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2014, 07:50:00 AM »
Was Sugar Hill still an affluent neighborhood by the 1960s? Or did the true power African American elite families pretty much moved to white neighborhoods with intregation?

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2014, 08:02:12 AM »
I always wondered how Atlanta along with other cities in Tennessee were able to have an intellectual flowering in the black culture spawned by their great historically black colleges yet Jax's Edward Waters College seemed to be the safety school?

Atlanta's historically black colleges fostered the black Harvard and Radcliffe, Vassar of the south and helped developed intellectual curiosity and greatness of African Americans.

Edward Waters College is enmeshed in scandals and rarely does one hear the biographers of our nation's African American political leaders, great poets or business come out of Edward Waters.

Just think of what Jacksonville could be today of EWC was a true center and leader in education and intellectual stimulation.


Was this because of subpar leadership at EWC when compared to Howard and Spellman among others?

Or was our African American community just as provincial and threatened by intellectuals as our white communities who feared white working class people getting too much book learnin' and threaten the status quo?

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2014, 08:07:14 AM »
I love to explore and try to understand why things are the way they are.


We today are a direct reflection of those who came before us.


There are reasons why Key West developed into the open minded funky party place it is today just as there are reasons why Atlanta is what it is today and why Jacksonville was never able to truly become the bold new city of the south.



What we do today from food truck legislation to helping or not helping Edward Waters College, Jacksonville University & UNF will help determine what Jacksonville will be like in 2025, 2050 and 2075.

Let's learn from our past to help create a better future. 

Wacca Pilatka

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2014, 08:53:19 AM »
On what street is the pictured row of shotgun houses in Durkeeville?  Thanks.
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thelakelander

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2014, 10:09:46 AM »
^Cleveland Street, between John E Ford Elementary and COJ's long demolished 4th & Cleveland waste incinerator. The old Standard Oil warehouse (now Lewis Petroleum Company), which parallels the S-Line, is directly across te street.



The back of Standard Oil/Lewis can be seen in the background (red brick warehouse on right) of this 1940s/50s image of the S-Line crossing Kings Road.


http://www.floridamemory.com/fpc/spottswood/sp01956.jpg

The 4th & Cleveland waste incinerator

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thelakelander

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2014, 10:16:25 AM »
Was Sugar Hill still an affluent neighborhood by the 1960s? Or did the true power African American elite families pretty much moved to white neighborhoods with intregation?

Urban renewal in Sugar Hill started before the 1960s.  Half of the neighborhood and its best amenities like Wilder Park (http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-oct-lost-jacksonville-wilder-park), were eliminated with the construction of the Jacksonville Expressway (now I-95) between 1955 and 1958. What I-95 left was eliminated by HUD and the hospitals which now make up UF Health Jacksonville. Not learning from our mistakes, we took a similar path with LaVilla during the 1990s.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

CityLife

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2014, 10:24:32 AM »
I always wondered how Atlanta along with other cities in Tennessee were able to have an intellectual flowering in the black culture spawned by their great historically black colleges yet Jax's Edward Waters College seemed to be the safety school?

Atlanta's historically black colleges fostered the black Harvard and Radcliffe, Vassar of the south and helped developed intellectual curiosity and greatness of African Americans.

Edward Waters College is enmeshed in scandals and rarely does one hear the biographers of our nation's African American political leaders, great poets or business come out of Edward Waters.

Just think of what Jacksonville could be today of EWC was a true center and leader in education and intellectual stimulation.


Was this because of subpar leadership at EWC when compared to Howard and Spellman among others?

Or was our African American community just as provincial and threatened by intellectuals as our white communities who feared white working class people getting too much book learnin' and threaten the status quo?

That would be an interesting study. I would imagine that FAMU played a role in Edward Waters inability to blossom into a better school. I'm sure Lake could answer this much better than I can, but I would guess that many of Jax's best African American students historically went to FAMU, and now with integration also attend a lot of the other state schools.

Edward Waters statistics are awful:

Transfer, Graduation and Retention Rates:

•First Year Student Retention (full-time students): 54%
•Transfer Out Rate: 33%
•4-Year Graduation Rate: 7%
•6-Year Graduation Rate: 23%

Average SAT scores for the 25 percentile are 680 and 75% percentile are 890.

thelakelander

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2014, 10:26:48 AM »
I love to explore and try to understand why things are the way they are.


We today are a direct reflection of those who came before us.


There are reasons why Key West developed into the open minded funky party place it is today just as there are reasons why Atlanta is what it is today and why Jacksonville was never able to truly become the bold new city of the south.



What we do today from food truck legislation to helping or not helping Edward Waters College, Jacksonville University & UNF will help determine what Jacksonville will be like in 2025, 2050 and 2075.

Let's learn from our past to help create a better future.

I'm the same way. Decisions made in the last 30-50 years are definitely impacting us economically now and the decisions we make today will impact future generations. 

For example, image the potential LaVilla could have today if we didn't rip every down in the 1990s (most peer cities had moved on from urban renewal by then).  We would have had a decent sized mixed-use walkable district adjacent to downtown with history and architecture, every bit as impressive as what people flock to Savannah and Charleston to spend their tourist money on.

On the transit side, image if JTA would have actually spent the $100 million in BJP funds allocated to them to start building a rapid transit system in Jax a decade ago. Perhaps, we'd have our own version of Charlotte's LRT and peer communities would be visiting us to see how to properly attract TOD. Unfortunately, it wasn't invested in a timely manner and the city ran out of money. In return, we got a courthouse that was +$100 million over budget.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

thelakelander

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2014, 10:37:05 AM »
Comparing EWC to FAMU, I'd say one major difference is FAMU is state school, while EWC is private, so FAMU has historically had more access to funding.  Even today, it's  the largest HBCU in the country by enrollment. Also, EWC didn't start awarding bachelor's degrees until the 1970s.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

CityLife

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2014, 11:00:51 AM »
Also, students can go to all the state schools including FAMU, UF, FSU, etc for about half of the cost to attend Edward Waters. Which kind of explains why their incoming SAT scores are so low. You can attend FAMU and pay for your living expenses for the year for less than it costs just to take your classes at EWC...and you would receive a better education at the state schools.

Tacachale

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2014, 12:23:40 PM »
We need to come up with a better way to describe what the Johnnie Woods blues performance of 1910 was and why it's significant. But it wasn't the first documented blues song (in fact the song itself isn't documented) and when most people hear music was "recorded" they're thinking of an audio recording.

The first documented blues song I'm aware of was Antonio Maggio's "I Got the Blues" from 1908. A ragtime song with a 12-bar blues riff in the first three strains, the sheet music was published in New Orleans by Maggio, a white Italian-born musician. There are documented songs going back as far as 1897 that associate the idea of having "the blues" with music, but they don't use the musical style we now call "the blues".

The first recorded blues song was probably Mamie Smith's rendition of "Crazy Blues", which didn't come until 1920.


Johnnie Woods' LaVilla performance was significant as it was the first known live blues performance ever to be documented, thanks to a review in the Indianapolis Freeman, of all things.

This is important as it shows that by 1910, blues music was being incorporated into professional music hall performances. It also shows that it was well enough known that the reviewer could expect his readers to know what "the 'blues'" meant. Locally, it's very important as it establishes Jacksonville's place a hub for early blues music, and that it was a significant center for African-American culture.
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Wacca Pilatka

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Re: 10 Facts About Jacksonville's Black History
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2014, 01:34:15 PM »
Thank you, Lake, for the info and the pictures.
The tourist would realize at once that he had struck the Land of Flowers - the City Beautiful!

Henry J. Klutho