Author Topic: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah  (Read 3974 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« on: November 13, 2012, 03:07:30 AM »
Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah



We've heard about JAXPORT's ambitious plans to grow into one of the East Coast's largest ports.  However, while we find ways to implement our dreams, the competition isn't sitting still. Today, Metro Jacksonville takes a ride on the Savannah River, while learning a little more about what the future holds for the Port of Savannah.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2012-nov-positioning-for-the-post-panamax-port-of-savannah

billy

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2012, 06:41:19 AM »
Plant Riverside is listed for sale with CBRE.
About 3.5 acres stretched out along river.

Noone

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2012, 06:47:56 AM »
Nice pics and update.

cline

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2012, 07:50:17 AM »
Quote
With Norfolk already able to accommodate the super post-Panamax ships, dredging in Miami starting in early 2013, and Savannah receiving final approval, what will happen to Jacksonville and JAXPORT's dreams?

We're way behind and it's not going to happen at this point.  We need to focus on other port niches rather than post-Panamax. 

tufsu1

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2012, 07:58:21 AM »
but wait...I've heard spin for several years about how much bigger and better our port is than the other ports in Florida (save for possibly Miami)...and now our JaxPort CEO is interviewing for the top job at the Port of Tampa...and some are saying its a "bigger job".

thelakelander

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2012, 08:33:29 AM »
Wow, how did we miss this!

Quote
Port of Jacksonville, Fl: the top-15 U.S. port “falling behind the most” due to a state budget crisis. Vital capital improvements to be Post-Panamax competitive along the East Coast are being deferred due to the state’s budget woes emanating from Florida’s deep housing crisis.  The state of Florida appears to have made the strategic decision to invest its limited available funds in the ports of Miami and Tampa – as well as intermodal systems in south and west Florida.  As a result, the Port of Jacksonville is falling behind in Post-Panamax readiness.  Georgia’s Savannah port authority finds itself in a similar situation – needed capital upgrades inhibited by a state budget crisis.

http://www.icsc.org/2012WF/2011%2012%20Dec%2029%20-%20Colliers%20US%20Port%20Spotlight.vFinalKC.pdf

As for Tampa, aren't they restricted by the Sunshine Skyway Bridge?  Seems like that is also a port better positioned to focus on other niches its location provides.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

fsujax

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2012, 08:33:42 AM »
according to the Business Journal, Anderson would take a pay cut if he went to Tampa.

tufsu1

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2012, 08:50:04 AM »
according to the Business Journal, Anderson would take a pay cut if he went to Tampa.

based on the last guy's salary there, that is a correct statement

bornnative

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2012, 09:34:25 AM »
Quote
With Norfolk already able to accommodate the super post-Panamax ships, dredging in Miami starting in early 2013, and Savannah receiving final approval, what will happen to Jacksonville and JAXPORT's dreams?

We're way behind and it's not going to happen at this point.  We need to focus on other port niches rather than post-Panamax.


+100, can't preach this enough.  don't abandon the container effort, but at least put some meaningful work into leveraging the assets & advantages we do have to create a dominant position in some other trade (which is absolutely possible).

spuwho

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2012, 05:39:53 PM »


When a fully loaded Maersk container ship goes by, that riverside dock for excursions rises anywhere from 3 to 4 feet depending how loaded the ship is. The water displacement on such a small river with dredging is still significant.

When I stayed on one of the top floors of a Savannah hotel, I was stunned when I looked out my window and there was the bridge of a ship looking right back at me.

The history of Savannah is great, but I found the constant passing of giant container ships disturbing to its character and on the boat tour of Upper Savannah, it was an industrial wasteland.

They kept the character of Savannah by doing a great job at preservation of the old city, but it has sold its soul to keep itself as a major eastern port.

djaffee

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2012, 08:35:13 PM »
Regarding the Savannah deepening project, I quote the following from my report "Jaxport as Urban Growth Strategy: Community Implications and Prospects":
"The Corp has recently given preliminary approval for the Savannah project, but only up to 47 feet based on their cost-benefit calculations. In addition, as part of the review process, the Corp has conducted one of the only economic impact studies of the Savannah port. One of its conclusions is quite striking: “no additional cargo volume through Savannah Harbor as a result of the proposed harbor deepening”.

The only additional Savannah employment estimated by the Corp are temporary jobs related to project construction.  They do not estimate permanent jobs. But if the deepening does not increase the quantity of cargo, it is unclear how the project will increase the number of port-related jobs to any significant degree.  Therefore, with a cost to taxpayers of $650 million, this dredging project would not appear to generate a sufficient labor market return on investment.

Instead, according to the report, the primary benefits will accrue to shipping companies, retailers, and foreign manufacturers who will save $174 million in transportation costs annually.  This is due to the ability of larger ships to move the cargo with fewer trips. Thus, the primary beneficiaries of this project are non-local businesses. The secondary impact of this cost savings is lower costs to consumers nationwide assuming the cost savings are passed on in lower prices."

For the full report go to:
http://www.unf.edu/uploadedFiles/aa/coas/cci/ports/Jaxport%20As%20An%20Urban%20Growth%20Strategy%20-%20CCI.pdf
at the University of North Florida Ports Project.
http://www.unf.edu/coas/cci/ports/




simms3

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Re: Positioning for the Post Panamax: Port of Savannah
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2012, 08:52:47 PM »
When a fully loaded Maersk container ship goes by, that riverside dock for excursions rises anywhere from 3 to 4 feet depending how loaded the ship is. The water displacement on such a small river with dredging is still significant.

When I stayed on one of the top floors of a Savannah hotel, I was stunned when I looked out my window and there was the bridge of a ship looking right back at me.

The history of Savannah is great, but I found the constant passing of giant container ships disturbing to its character and on the boat tour of Upper Savannah, it was an industrial wasteland.

They kept the character of Savannah by doing a great job at preservation of the old city, but it has sold its soul to keep itself as a major eastern port.

That is very interesting...will check the rising tide next time I'm in town!  Keep in mind Savannah is actually owned by Atlanta.  :)
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