Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 69828 times)

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #135 on: December 11, 2012, 11:42:47 AM »
"drink till were gone"  Lucero

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Biography

Lucero's sound has been described as a "synthesis of soul, rock, and country [that] is distinctly Memphisian."[1] The band had their start in Memphis, TN and played for the first time in early 1998. Since 2001, they have played between 150 and 200 shows a year across the United States and Canada and have been called "one of the hardest working bands of the last 10 years—on tour significantly more days than they are not."[2] Lucero has released eight full length albums.[3]

The members of Lucero are Roy Berry (drums), John C. Stubblefield (bass), Brian Venable (guitar), and Ben Nichols (guitar and vocals), Rick Steff (piano, organ, accordion), and Todd Beene (pedal steel). Todd Gill substituted for Brian Venable from 2003 to 2004. The band also experimented with guitarist Steve Selvidge in the early months of 2003.

In late 2008 the band announced they had signed a four album deal with Universal Music Group,[4] though the relationship with Universal was short-lived.[5] 1372 Overton Park was released October 6, 2009 by Universal Music Group and was the first Lucero album to feature a horn section.

Lucero's latest album, Women & Work, was released on March 13, 2012 by ATO Records. This new album integrates more of the horn section as well as the pedal steel guitar, keyboards and a gospel chorus.[6][7]

The first solo release from frontman Ben Nichols, The Last Pale Light in the West, was released in January 2009 on Lucero's label Liberty & Lament. The seven-song record was inspired by Cormac McCarthy's book Blood Meridian and recorded with Rick Steff on piano and accordion and Todd Beane on pedal steel.[8]

In May 2009, Nichols co-starred in MTV's $5 Cover, a Craig Brewer-produced quasi-fictionalized series about the Memphis music scene. A performance of Lucero's song "San Francisco" at the Young Avenue Deli in Memphis was featured in the trailer for the series.[9]

Ben Nichols' previous band was Red 40 in which he played alongside Colin Brooks and Steve Kooms.[10]

Drummer Roy Berry is half of experimental duo Overjoid[11] and was a member of the Memphis-based band The Simple Ones before joining Lucero.[12]

John C. Stubblefield has recorded with North Mississippi Allstars, Jim Dickinson and Sack Lunch, among others. He co-produced Hill Country Revue’s 2010 album Zebra Ranch.[13]

Brian Venable is Henry’s Dad.[14]

Rick Steff has recorded with Cat Power, Hank Williams Jr. and Dexys Midnight Runners, among others.[15]

Todd Beene is also currently a member of the Tennessee band Glossary.[16]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucero_%28band%29

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #136 on: December 12, 2012, 01:30:32 AM »
...and then there is the undisputed Holy Grail of Southern Rock:

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A lover tells his beloved that he must be "traveling on" because he can't be "chained", but he's the one begging her from the beginning... "Will you still remember me?"  (He isn't nearly as free as he confesses to be.)

This is what makes this song so powerful.  The audience may know more than the freebird --  that he is tied to his love, his home, his family by far more than he'd like us to believe he is.

Or at least that is MHO.





sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #137 on: December 12, 2012, 07:56:06 AM »
Number 43:  "Bounty Hunter"  Molly Hatchet

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Last week, from their European tour.

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #138 on: December 12, 2012, 08:18:25 AM »
Always loved the Outlaws...

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In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #139 on: December 12, 2012, 08:28:10 AM »
Ozark Mountain Daredevils... If you wanna get to Heaven... love the harmonica.

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In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #140 on: December 12, 2012, 08:29:39 AM »
Thanks BridgeTroll!

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The Outlaws[1] are a southern rock/country rock band formed in Tampa, Florida in late 1967 by guitarist–vocalist Hughie Thomasson, drummer David Dix, bassist Phil Holmberg, guitarists Hobie O'Brien and Frank Guidry, plus singer Herb Pino. Guidry brought the name Outlaws with him when he joined (he had been in another group that had that name).
.......................
While the Outlaws are generally considered to be a part of the southern rock genre, there are distinct differences in their approach and their influences. Their primary similarity to other southern rock bands is the dual lead guitar interplay, a defining characteristic of many southern rock bands. However, the Outlaws’ mix of country and rock elements displays the vocal harmony influences of groups like Buffalo Springfield, the Byrds, and Poco. Their use of three and four part harmonies set them apart from their contemporaries who usually relied on a single lead vocalist.

Hughie Thomasson's signature guitar playing style and voice were defining characteristics of the band's sound. Thomasson's guitar sound was underpinned by the use of the Fender Stratocaster (and sometimes a Fender Telecaster) played in a quasi-country style mixed with fluid, quick blues runs. Hughie was nicknamed "The Flame" for his flaming fast guitar work. He is a member of the Fender Hall of Fame.

The other lead guitarist, Billy Jones, played mainly a Gibson Les Paul and switched between a clean and distorted sound. A good example of this can be heard on "Green Grass and High Tides" on the right stereo channel. Hughie Thomasson's smooth Stratocaster sound can be heard on the left channel. Thomasson opens the first solo at the intro and plays the first half of the two succeeding longer solos all on the right channel. There are many video examples of his Green Grass solos on the internet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outlaws_%28band%29

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #141 on: December 12, 2012, 08:33:24 AM »
Question:  Is "Southern Rock" more closely defined by the sound or the bands original location?  I have a few more classics... but the bands began in Non southern areas of the country...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #142 on: December 12, 2012, 08:34:42 AM »
Quote
The Ozark Mountain Daredevils are a Southern rock/country rock band formed in 1972 in Springfield, Missouri, USA. They are most widely known for their singles "If You Wanna Get To Heaven" in 1974 and "Jackie Blue" in 1975.

The Daredevils are also mentioned in the "Don's Story" chapter of American humorist David Sedaris' book Barrel Fever. Bassist Michael "Supe" Granda has also written a book about the band, It Shined.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #143 on: December 12, 2012, 08:40:38 AM »
Question:  Is "Southern Rock" more closely defined by the sound or the bands original location?  I have a few more classics... but the bands began in Non southern areas of the country...

Great question. 

Musically, it is defined by (Adam!  Help me!) an emphasis on the lead guitar.  Southern rock is all about the guitar man.  But additionally, it is about the lyrics.  Southern rock sings about a sense of place -- about home, working class values and struggles. 

The genre isn't about the origin of the band, IMHO, but of the elements of the song.

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #144 on: December 12, 2012, 08:49:57 AM »
Pure Prairie League... Band formed in Ohio... but I always put it in the Southern/country rock category...

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In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #145 on: December 12, 2012, 09:00:14 AM »
New Riders of the Purple Sage... lives on the edge of southern/country rock... Formed in California... Grateful Dead influenced...

Panama Red... humorous weed song...

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In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Traveller

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #146 on: December 12, 2012, 09:25:30 AM »
The line between Southern Rock and similar genres like Alt.country or Red Dirt can certainly be a blurry one.  Would you consider bands like Cross Canadian Ragweed, Reckless Kelly, or Shooter Jennings "Southern Rock"?

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #147 on: December 12, 2012, 12:52:26 PM »
Thanks Traveller!!! Have to check this out.

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Red Dirt Music is a music genre that gets its name from the color of soil found in Oklahoma. Although Stillwater, Oklahoma is considered to be the center of Red Dirt music,[1] there's a Texas Red Dirt sound as well. Outlaws Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson are associated with that distinctive Texas sound while Bob Childers defines Oklahoma Red Dirt music. At one time the distinction between the two genres was obvious, but by 2008 that gap had diminished.[2]

History

Oklahoma has been the source of several pop music movements that can be traced not only to a specific city, but a specific location within the city. Those music scenes include Kansas City jazz (attributed to an area of Oklahoma City called Deep Deuce), Western swing (attributed to Cain's Ballroom in Tulsa), and Leon Russell's Tulsa Sound from his Tulsa church-turned-into-studio. Like those three, Red Dirt music grew from a specific place in Stillwater. The place was an old two-story, five-bedroom house called "The Farm" - for two decades the center of what evolved into the Red Dirt scene.[3] The house, located on the outskirts of Stillwater, was the country home of Bob Childers. Eventually Childers left The Farm, but the Red Dirt scene continued to grow and thrive.[4] Childers said, "I found something in Stillwater that I just didn't find anywhere else. And I looked everywhere from Nashville to Austin. I always came back to Stillwater - it's like a fountainhead for folks trying to get their vision."[5]
The Red Dirt Rangers (Ben Han, Brad Piccolo, John Cooper) performing at the Woody Guthrie Folk Festival. July 12, 2008.

One of many bands representing Red Dirt music - as their name signifies - is the Red Dirt Rangers. The Rangers - John Cooper, Brad Piccolo and Ben Han - have been making music since the late-1980s and, along with Childers, were part of The Farm's earliest musical brotherhood which also included Jimmy LaFave and Tom Skinner. These musicians and others jammed in the living room, on the front porch, in the garage (known as the Gypsy Cafe), and around campfires in the yard where "the sheer joy of creating music with friends transcended everything else."[3] Cooper said, "The Farm was as much an attitude as a physical structure. It allowed a setting where freedom rang and all things were possible. Out of this setting came the music." The physical structure burned down in 2003.[3]
Definition

Critics say that Red Dirt can best be likened to the indie genre of rock 'n' roll as there is no definitive sound that can be attributed to all the bands in the movement. Most Red Dirt artists would be classified by the music industry as Americana, folk, or alt-country, though the range of sounds in the Red Dirt spectrum goes beyond these genres. It has been described as a mix of folk, rock, country, bluegrass, blues, Western swing, and honky tonk, with even a few Mexican influences. Singer-songwriter and former Stillwater resident Jimmy LaFave said,

    "It's kind of hard to put into words, but if you ever drive down on the (Mississippi) Delta, you can almost hear that blues sound," he explains. "Go to New Orleans, and you can almost hear the Dixieland jazz. Go to San Francisco, and you get that psychedelic-music vibe. You hear the Red Dirt sound when you go through Stillwater. It has to do with the spirit of the people. There's something different about them. They're not Texans, they're Okies, and I think the whole Red Dirt sound is just as important to American musicology as the San Francisco Sound or any of the rest. It's distinctly its own thing."[6]

Jimmy LaFave performing at the Woody Guthrie Folk Festival along with (L-R) Radoslav Lorković, Joel Rafael, Butch Hancock, Audrey Auld Mezera and David Amram. July 12, 2008.

Some define Red Dirt music as "country music with an attitude".[7] Others say it's a state of mind as much as it is a sound - a sound that successfully closes the gap between rock and country.[7]

Although many bands got their start in Stillwater, each band has a distinctive sound said Brandon Jackson, guitarist for the band No Justice. "The sound is different from each band to band to band. Some guys are more rock, some guys are more country, and there's everything in between," Jackson said. Cody Canada, front-man for the band Cross Canadian Ragweed said, ""It's country, folksy, it's bluesy, it's rock, and it's just blue collar music. It's a lot about the lyrics. It's a lot about the feeling of it. It doesn't have a label, I guess. It's everything from Merle Haggard influence to full blown Rolling Stones."[4]

Marc Ringwood, founder of Texas Troubadours - a website dedicated to the sounds of Oklahoma and Texas - says, "I don’t think there is a true way to define it. Trying to analyze it, you see that a lot of artists carry the same influences going back to the days of Bob Wills and Woody Guthrie (for the older artists and bands), and then you have new guys who have followed in stride with their peers by feeding off their influences. Red Dirt also has more of a spiritual quality within the music. It’s more honest, and true and noncliched, like a lot of other music we’re exposed to in major markets."[8]

When asked to define Red Dirt music in an interview with Texas Troubadours, Red Dirt musician and Tahlequah resident Randy Crouch said, "Well, I don't think I'd be the one who's able to define it, but it seems to have Oklahoma values, you know how Okies are real good at doing everything themselves, maybe a sense of independence about it. It's natural, and honest, and about real life. You know, it's almost like the way Woody approached music."[9]

Ben Cisneros, a writer for The 9513 - a country music blog website - says Red Dirt is a "movement" that has managed to create an infrastructure enabling regional success. He states that "program directors and DJs all over Texas and Oklahoma have set up shows that feature Red Dirt music. Not only that, but many stations in major markets are including Red Dirt music in their regular rotation right alongside mainstream modern country."[10]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Dirt_%28music%29

« Last Edit: December 12, 2012, 12:54:05 PM by sheclown »

Tacachale

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #148 on: December 12, 2012, 01:12:42 PM »
Southern Rock is all about the guitar, but specifically the blues-rock sound. Musically, alt-country is, well country, though of course there's overlap, especially in the lyrics.

I wouldn't say Southern Rock is tied exclusively to a Southern origin for the band, but there are virtually no Southern Rock bands that came from outside of the South. In the classic period, anyway. I wouldn't call any band that emerged after the mid-80s "Southern Rock", though of course many later bands have strong Southern Rock influences.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #149 on: December 12, 2012, 03:07:42 PM »
Definitely over-lap with lyrics, thematically.

Southern Rock has something on stage with it at all times...the south-land.  And if a southern man has a "chip" on his shoulder, it is most likely a microchip tying him to his home.

And that is what makes it so appealing -- that and the guitar.