Author Topic: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio  (Read 10788 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« on: July 31, 2012, 03:44:16 AM »
Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio



Metro Jacksonville visits a peer community with a vibrant downtown in Central Ohio: Columbus

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2012-jul-elements-of-urbanism-columbus-ohio

tufsu1

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2012, 08:48:19 AM »
great timing...I'm on my way to Cincy, Columbus, and Louisville this weekend

David

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2012, 09:20:38 AM »
Columbus totally surprised me. I was on a 2 week road trip that took me though Atlanta, Knoxville, Lexington & Cincy with a final destination of Pittsburgh and Columbus just happened to be on the way.  I had never bothered to look up any stats on the city so when I saw its skyline pop over the horizon after I came around a curve on I-71  I was literally taken a back.

I had always assumed it was a small college town similar to Gainesville, not a city larger than Jax. I only had 24 hours to spend there but I spent most of my time in the short north and downtown driving around taking pictures of the architecture. I'd visit more often if it were closer, it appeared to have a lot going on.

thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2012, 09:58:02 AM »
great timing...I'm on my way to Cincy, Columbus, and Louisville this weekend
Sounds like a pretty cool trip.
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tufsu1

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2012, 10:23:38 AM »
^ yeah...and I heard from a certain someone that flying in and out of Dayton is the way to go ;)

vicupstate

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2012, 11:57:53 AM »
Quote
The Short North is heavily populated with art galleries, specialty shops, pubs, nightclubs, and coffee houses. Most of its tightly packed brick buildings date from at least the early 20th century, with traditional storefronts along High Street (often with brightly painted murals on their side walls), and old apartment buildings and rowhouses and newer condominium developments in the surrounding blocks.

This is why you don't tear down a building just because it is distressed or vacant or in need of renovation.  I would bet this same area was distressed also, not that long ago.  You could not possible 'build new' to replicate the same environment either, even if it made economic sense to do so (which in most cases it would not).   
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copperfiend

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2012, 04:02:27 PM »


Would this type of signage even be allowed in our town?

Ocklawaha

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2012, 07:05:24 PM »
Quote
Building signage is one of the major visual and physical differences between downtown Columbus and downtown Jacksonville.  The unique combination of signage and using buildings as advertising creates a flair of life that doesn't exist in Jacksonville's Northbank.

Quote
Chief of police Vinzant is determined that the streets of the city shall not be obstructed by signs that may mar the beauty of Jacksonville. Already there have been arrests of merchants who refused to take the signs down and the chief is adamant in stating that if the merchants do not comply with the law, more arrests will follow.

Jacksonville, Florida Times-Union, Nov 13, 1909

Karma?

Fallen Buckeye

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2012, 09:34:50 PM »
Getting me homesick. My hometown is about an hour east, but I have spent a good deal of time in C-bus and have lots of friends and family there. I think Ohio State has a big influence on the community. It's actually in the city, and it brings a ton of business. There's also a steady stream of skilled workers to work for all these companies. Couple that with all the state government and you have a really stable base to build on.

Fallen Buckeye

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2012, 09:41:34 PM »
There's one other thing Columbus does that I wish they would do here: railroad overpasses. Instead of blocking up these major streets in town with railroad crossings, a lot of the trains go over traffic on little bridges. Is there a reason they can't do this here besides cost?

Ocklawaha

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2012, 11:01:35 PM »
So how did COLUMBUS become a metro larger and arguably more vibrant then Jacksonville? Here's an Ockphoto essay...



Columbus Interurban Terminal


Ohio and Indiana Interurban Electric Railways





Emblem of the high speed Cincinnati and Lake Erie Railway, who's lightweight cars often moved at speeds approaching 100 mph.


Columbus Interurban Terminal. Note the two C&LE RY lightweight cars on the left of the Columbus, Delaware and Marion heavyweight car.


Columbus Interurban Terminal, track plan


Columbus Interurban Terminal, Passenger Station


Columbus Interurban Freight Station


A well maintained Ohio and Southern Traction Company car, smallest of the local interurbans


Columbus, Buckeye Lake and Newkirk RY., at Canton


Rare color shots of Columbus, Delaware and Marion Railway

A History Lesson on the Columbus Interurban System
By: Walker

The Ohio Historical Society unveiled a new historical marker yesterday to honor the recently restored interurban depot in Canal Winchester. The Dispatch has a great article running today (“Depot’s day, 80 years later“) that features a bit of history about this electric fixed-rail system that served the region in a similar manner to a light-rail network. The interurban was a popular, inexpensive and highly utilized system that carried passengers at up to 60mph from Columbus to Chillicothe, Zanesville, Marion, Dayton and all points in between. Unfortunately, the automaker lobbyists killed the system in the 1930s and it only lives on through historical markers.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Depot's day, 80 years later
Siblings recall Canal Winchester rail stop as it gets historical marker
 
80 years ago, George and Dorothy Boving came home from school and were told by their father to go straight to the depot.

"We didn't hesitate to do what our dad told us to do," Mr. Boving said yesterday. "We really just sat there on the train, but I think our dad kind of realized it was historic."

What their father realized - and they didn't - was that it was the last ride on the Scioto Valley Traction Line for the interurban, an electric passenger railroad that was the light-rail system of its time.

The seats were comfortable and the carriage wasn't noisy, Mr. Boving said.

Waiting at the end of the line in Lancaster was their mother and baby brother, and several hundred people who then saw off the car as it headed back toward Columbus.

They stepped off the train and posed with other passengers for a photo.

Yesterday, an enlarged copy of that picture was on display at the dedication of a historic marker at the Canal Winchester Interurban Depot.

In it, Dorothy, 10, is looking off to the side, holding 8-year-old George's hand.

Mr. Boving, now 87, and his sister, Dorothy Boving Hockman, 89, attended the ceremony at the depot in Canal Winchester.

Mr. Boving even donned a white cap, shorts and high socks similar to those he's wearing in the photo as a child.

The station opened in 1904, but the rise of the automobile eventually drove the interurban into obsolescence, rail historian Alex Campbell said.

When the last car traveled in 1930, Columbus' population, now more than 1 million people in the metropolitan area, had grown to a whopping 290,564 people.

The interurban, with cars that could top 60 mph, brought Columbus closer to outlying farm towns, Campbell said.

The Scioto track started Downtown, wound through German Village and out to Obetz. There, it spilt into two lines, with one bound for Lancaster and the other for Chillicothe.

Hockman said she remembers riding it to a little red schoolhouse every day in the first grade.

One rainy morning, she showed up at the station and the tall girl who normally pulled the handle to signal the car to stop for them wasn't there. She couldn't reach high enough, and the interurban passed by. Just as she began to cry, the train stopped and backed up.

Another girl had told the conductor that he had to go back for Dorothy.

When the interurban stopped running, the old Canal Winchester depot, behind 20 S. High St., was transformed into offices for a power company.

But the village bought the building in 2002, deciding to restore the depot to its original gray brick with a red tile roof and bright-white trim. Canal Winchester has spent $123,000 on the project, although some of that has come from donations and grants, Mayor Michael Ebert said.

"It's our intention to bring back some of the feel of a day gone by," he said.

tufsu1

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2012, 11:03:53 PM »
So how did COLUMBUS become a metro larger and arguably more vibrant then Jacksonville? Here's an Ockphoto essay...

two other reasons

1. state capitol
2. O-H-I-O (they do have 56,000 students)

JFman00

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2012, 12:06:59 AM »
So how did COLUMBUS become a metro larger and arguably more vibrant then Jacksonville? Here's an Ockphoto essay...

two other reasons

1. state capitol
2. O-H-I-O (they do have 56,000 students)


we have twice as many students here in jacksonville, tufsu.

That's 56k at "the" OSU alone. If you're counting community colleges (which I think is safe to guess that you are, given the 80k enrollment of FSCJ), their number is around 100k.

peestandingup

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2012, 02:43:16 AM »
So how did COLUMBUS become a metro larger and arguably more vibrant then Jacksonville? Here's an Ockphoto essay...

two other reasons

1. state capitol
2. O-H-I-O (they do have 56,000 students)

we have twice as many students here in jacksonville, tufsu.

Its not about numbers. There's no real "campus life" here. FSCJ is a gussied up community college & UNF is in a suburban strip mall. Whereas Ohio State is a place where students live & breathe the actual college lifestyle, centered in the Columbus urban core. Plus, its a much older institution.

They're not even remotely the same things.

vicupstate

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Columbus, Ohio
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2012, 06:40:42 AM »
Jax should try to get an art school.  The one is Savannah has done more for their urban core than just about anything, except the tourists. 
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