Author Topic: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future  (Read 8060 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« on: July 25, 2012, 03:04:41 AM »
JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future



Brad Thoburn, Jacksonville Transportation Authority's (JTA) Director of Strategic Planning and Research, shares the agency's strategic vision plan with Metro Jacksonville.



Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2012-jul-jtas-strategic-vision-for-the-future

simms3

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2012, 07:07:23 AM »
Pretty offensive reading if you ask me.  To me it sounds like he's giving lip service to MetroJacksonville, but yet their planning department still seems so misguided and way behind the curve.
Bothering locals and trolling boards since 2005

dougskiles

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2012, 07:11:40 AM »
Is it possible to do all the things that are mentioned in the article with the limited funding that JTA is facing in the future?

One of the questions JTA should be asking themselves is are they trying to be too much to too many, and getting so spread out in the process that they are mediocre at best in delivering on any of them?

To say that they will provide service to our entire sprawling city (coverage based) while also attracting choice riders (frequency based) may be unrealistic.  Any significant amout of money spent toward one goal will detract from the other.  There is only a small amount of overlap between the two.

My preference would be to see JTA provide high frequency service between our higher density nodes.  Connecting the urban neighborhoods to the downtown core would be a start.

Then look to the neighborhoods to assist with the funding of the local collection systems.  Everyone will say that they want such as system, but when faced with the prospect of paying extra, we will find out which areas really mean it.  There are creative financing solutions out there involving TIFs and BIDs that we have largely overlooked in Jacksonville.  Doing so would return local neighborhood control to a consolidated city that has arguably been poor at managing competing interests.

An overwhelming majority of people who live in the lower density areas have chosen an automobile lifestyle.  Money spent trying to connect them with transit service is largely wasted.  For those who need (or are choosing) a transit-dependent lifestyle, options should be provided for them to live and work near the transit service areas.  TODs should focus on providing affordable housing and attracting large employers.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2012, 09:06:13 AM by dougskiles »

daveindesmoines1

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2012, 08:04:28 AM »
I have an elderly parent that lives there in Jacksonville. She should not drive due to her eyesight. This story concerning mass transit for our aging baby boomers is very important. Can the following be implemented to create a more efficient mass transit for those who need to go to doctors' appointments, pharmacies, and grocery stores? Can the following help reduce the feeling of isolation among our elderly, as well? Can patients fill out a survey at the doctor's office for when and if they need transportation to go to these doctor's appointments and to the pharmacy? Perhaps they could fill out their address to see what zone they live in. Then a smart phone APP could assign doctors' appointments based on where these patients lives. This way, vans could pick people up in a certain zone then transport them to medical centers to see their doctors. The bus organization would call people up just before these vans are about to pick them up...There is a problem of the elderly feeling isolated. If the same patients could ride these vans and wait in the same doctor's waiting room; they may make new social connections of like minded people. Thus reduce this feeling of isolation. These vans would transport people to the same pharmacy and grocery stores afterwards as other patients; who live in the same zone...If we are talking about transporting patients to specialists at major hospitals, they could organize new "bus trains" that are run on wheels. Perhaps 3-5 vans could transport people from certain zones to the major bus stops of "bus tains" on wheels. These "bus trains" on wheels would transport people from area zones to regional medical centers then back again. Again doctor's appointments at these regional medical centers, would be made by an APP based upon where these patients lives... Can these concepts create a better run bus system and at the same time reduce the feeling of isolation among our elderly? You be the judge. However these concepts just may work to consider. 

tufsu1

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2012, 08:06:06 AM »
Pretty offensive reading if you ask me.  To me it sounds like he's giving lip service to MetroJacksonville, but yet their planning department still seems so misguided and way behind the curve.

that's a bit harsh simms.....many of the people in the JTA Planning Department do know the deal on what needs to be done to take the agency and city to the next level....unfortunately, leadership at the top of the agency isn't quite there yet. 

dougskiles

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2012, 08:20:08 AM »
I have an elderly parent that lives there in Jacksonville. She should not drive due to her eyesight. This story concerning mass transit for our aging baby boomers is very important. Can the following be implemented to create a more efficient mass transit for those who need to go to doctors' appointments, pharmacies, and grocery stores? Can the following help reduce the feeling of isolation among our elderly, as well? Can patients fill out a survey at the doctor's office for when and if they need transportation to go to these doctor's appointments and to the pharmacy? Perhaps they could fill out their address to see what zone they live in. Then a smart phone APP could assign doctors' appointments based on where these patients lives. This way, vans could pick people up in a certain zone then transport them to medical centers to see their doctors. The bus organization would call people up just before these vans are about to pick them up...There is a problem of the elderly feeling isolated. If the same patients could ride these vans and wait in the same doctor's waiting room; they may make new social connections of like minded people. Thus reduce this feeling of isolation. These vans would transport people to the same pharmacy and grocery stores afterwards as other patients; who live in the same zone...If we are talking about transporting patients to specialists at major hospitals, they could organize new "bus trains" that are run on wheels. Perhaps 3-5 vans could transport people from certain zones to the major bus stops of "bus tains" on wheels. These "bus trains" on wheels would transport people from area zones to regional medical centers then back again. Again doctor's appointments at these regional medical centers, would be made by an APP based upon where these patients lives... Can these concepts create a better run bus system and at the same time reduce the feeling of isolation among our elderly? You be the judge. However these concepts just may work to consider.

We can't only look at transit as the solution to the problem you are identifying.  The isolation is a result of our sprawling development pattern of the last 50 years.  There is a clear need for more living choices for the elderly that are closer to the essential services they will require as they age - particularly choices that don't require long and expensive trips by either automobile or bus.

John P

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2012, 08:41:03 AM »
Pretty offensive reading if you ask me.  To me it sounds like he's giving lip service to MetroJacksonville, but yet their planning department still seems so misguided and way behind the curve.

that's a bit harsh simms.....many of the people in the JTA Planning Department do know the deal on what needs to be done to take the agency and city to the next level....unfortunately, leadership at the top of the agency isn't quite there yet.

Where are they in finding a replacement for Michael Blaylock?

fieldafm

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2012, 08:42:17 AM »
Pretty offensive reading if you ask me.  To me it sounds like he's giving lip service to MetroJacksonville, but yet their planning department still seems so misguided and way behind the curve.

Brad is quite an intelligent guy. 

I think the point that you may be missing is that JTA is facing a series of very large choices based on their limited resources (resources that will become even more scarce with the expiration of the gas tax).
   
My sincere hope is that in the face of dwindling funding (and clear market demand and nationwide trends) they choose to focus on improving transit infrastructure that improves the economic mobility of an emerging workforce and less on road building projects like widening Pecan Park Road.

Quote
My preference would be to see JTA provide high frequency service between our higher density nodes.  Connecting the urban neighborhoods to the downtown core would be a start.

Then look to the neighborhoods to assist with the funding of the local collection systems.  Everyone will say that they want such as system, but when faced with the prospect of paying extra, we will find out which areas really mean it.  There are creative financing solutions out there involving TIFs and BIDs that we have largely overlooked in Jacksonville.  Doing so would return local neighborhood control to a consolidated city that has arbuably been poor at managing competing interests.

Couldn't agree more.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2012, 08:49:31 AM by fieldafm »

tufsu1

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2012, 08:42:45 AM »
from what I've heard, applicatiosn have been coming in and a short list is in process...of course, not surprising for JTA, nothing has been made public yet.

daveindesmoines1

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2012, 08:43:40 AM »
dougskiles, I totally agree with you. However, many of our elderly have many memories of where they live and would not want to move so fast. However, eventually they will have to as time goes by. Are there ways to help our elderly stay in their homes longer until then. At the same time, we have a record amount of student loans debt. Is there a better way for college students to work their way through college so to not acquire so much debt? Can they help build ramps, install special baths with panic buttons, and rebuild kitchens in exchange for vouchers to tuition reduction. Are there other ways for our elderly to stay safely longer in their homes before they need to move? Finally, Cities need to create new programs to help our elderly adjust to finally moving once that time is near. Finally, I totally agree that our elderly will need to move to retirement villages as time goes by...

dougskiles

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2012, 09:03:25 AM »
^ I am not necessarily talking about retirement villages.  An urban neighborhood with full commercial and medical services can significantly reduce the cost of transit.  The problem is that single family homes far from these services are so cheap that most can't resist the temptation to buy - not realizing that someday it results in a lifestyle that is too expensive to sustain.

We need to be promoting construction of affordable living options near the places that already have these services and not promoting continued sprawl (my lead in for ending the Mobility Fee moratorium...)

JTA is integral to this solution and needs to be leading the charge in promoting responsible land use.  Where are they in the Mobility Plan conversation?  So far, I have heard no official position.

cline

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2012, 09:11:25 AM »
Quote
Brad is quite an intelligent guy.

I agree that there are plenty of intelligent people inside of JTA, no doubt.  Unfortunately, JTA leadership doesn't listen these people and that keeps us stuck where we were decades ago.  Meanwhile, our peer cities move farther and farther ahead of us. 

Quote
   
My sincere hope is that in the face of dwindling funding (and clear market demand and nationwide trends) they choose to focus on improving transit infrastructure that improves the economic mobility of an emerging workforce and less on road building projects like widening Pecan Park Road.

Perhaps JTA should be completely dismantled and rebuilt as an actual transit agency rather than a road building agency that does transit on the side. 


Captain Zissou

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2012, 09:18:04 AM »
Does anyone else find the article title ironic?

cline

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2012, 09:21:03 AM »
^lol, that's good :)

Fallen Buckeye

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Re: JTA's Strategic Vision for the Future
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2012, 09:25:34 AM »
I have to play devil's advocate here. Jacksonville has many areas rife with poverty whose citizens depend on public transportation for their livelihood. To me, increasing frequency of service in high density areas like Riverside and San Marco is a luxury, and providing dependable transit to a wide area (because poverty has a wide footprint in Jax) is essential and should be our first priority. Planning for frequent service that encourages dense growth is important, too, but only after we make sure those most in need are taken care of.