Author Topic: Elements of Urbanism: Deland  (Read 2106 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« on: July 20, 2011, 03:01:53 AM »
Elements of Urbanism: Deland



Metro Jacksonville visits a small community that has been successful at revitalizing its downtown through its Main Street Program: Deland, Florida.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-jul-elements-of-urbanism-deland

vicupstate

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2011, 07:44:30 AM »
What a clean, inviting, charming and attractive city.  I DARE anyone to drive down those streets, and NOT get out and do some walking.  They get an A+ for asthetics and pedestrian experience based on the pics.     
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jandar

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2011, 08:52:12 AM »
But make sure you go down the road to Deltona and see what a nightmare of suburbia that truly is. Hell, they have to tear down houses just to build a gas station. Seriously, no one should complain about Jax till they go there.

Deland is nice though, still has a country feel right outside of town too. So yes, its walkable urban with dirt roads and big yards just a few miles from town, although suburbia is catching up quickly.


ChriswUfGator

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2011, 09:42:35 AM »
I'm friends with one of the Putnams, old family from west Volusia they had a lot of timber property and lately ferneries, that hotel is named after. I was born in Daytona and very nearly went to Stetson, but state tuition was too good to pass up. Our summer place was a bit up the St Johns from there, in Astor. I have always liked Deland. Volusia County is my old stomping grounds. But anyway, maybe one of our expert urban planners (one in particular) could explain to me why it is economically viable, active, and chaos doesn't reign everywhere despite the lack of parking meters?

I thought parking meters were the key to success?


Jumpinjack

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2011, 10:08:59 AM »
When we first started restoration of our 1910 house in Riverside, we were in need of lots of interior lighting fixtures, wood trim, pocket doors, sinks, etc which had all been stripped out of the house by the former owner.

We went to Deland and visited Florida Victorian Antiques, http://www.floridavictorian.com/  a wonderful salvage resource in Deland. They are just a couple of blocks off the main street and they are worth the drive. The owners  know their stuff and price it reasonably. After feeling ripped off by local salvage merchants, this place is a treat.

thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2011, 10:24:09 AM »
I'm friends with one of the Putnams, old family from west Volusia they had a lot of timber property and lately ferneries, that hotel is named after. I was born in Daytona and very nearly went to Stetson, but state tuition was too good to pass up. Our summer place was a bit up the St Johns from there, in Astor. I have always liked Deland. Volusia County is my old stomping grounds. But anyway, maybe one of our expert urban planners (one in particular) could explain to me why it is economically viable, active, and chaos doesn't reign everywhere despite the lack of parking meters?

I thought parking meters were the key to success?

All meters do is generate minor revenue (about $600k/yr) to sustain parking enforcement at the expense of downtown end-user experience.  There are other ways to ensure parking turn over, if that's your desired goal.  Like many other places, Deland's free on-street spaces are time limited.  I assume the money used to fund parking enforcement's existence comes from parking tickets.  So, they're still getting turnover without inconveniencing the end user.

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tufsu1

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2011, 10:24:38 AM »
maybe one of our expert urban planners (one in particular) could explain to me why it is economically viable, active, and chaos doesn't reign everywhere despite the lack of parking meters?

hmm...maybe because their street spaces have posted time limits w/ enforcement...like those in San Marco and Five Points

floridaforester

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2011, 10:48:36 PM »
Deland is a great little town, very walkable and nice historic neighborhoods.  However, I did once make the mistake of driving down for a nice Sunday afternoon there.  Please don't make that mistake because this Baptist town is locked up tight on Sundays.  I mean just about everything is closed (at least downtown).  Sure you can find some chain eatery at the interstate exit, but nothing you'd really want to eat at.  Next time I will make sure to go on Saturday.

thekillingwax

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Deland
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2011, 02:22:39 AM »
I love Deland. We decided to take a day trip and started off the morning with swimming and pancakes at DeLeon Springs and went to Deland to walk around and have lunch. I like Deland because it doesn't feel forced, it's not a tourist trap and most of the little stores and eateries are the real deal. We had lunch at this tiny greek place called Santorini and it was the best greek food I've ever had. The prices are great and the portions for the lunch plates are epic. I mistook my gyro for a football.