Author Topic: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's "Crossroads"  (Read 3069 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's "Crossroads"
« on: July 12, 2011, 03:07:11 AM »
Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's "Crossroads"



While much of the focus in our city is on downtown revitalization, Jacksonville's Urban Core and inner ring suburbs are home to a number of long-overlooked historic, walkable commercial districts. In our effort to promote better use of existing assets in our communities - which will facilitate sustainable growth and subsequently increase the city's tax base, Metro Jacksonville highlight's Old Arlington's "Crossroads" district.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-jul-walkable-commercial-districts-arlingtons-crossroads

Noone

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2011, 05:25:48 AM »
Nice article Ennis. Curb extentions to slow traffic is interesting. Go over the Mathews to Arlington and all the free parking at the Town Center by McDonalds. Lots of open free parking.

Start walking and the small stores that you highlight. Question does a small business that has a parking space right outside their business want to lose that parking spot or two or does the small business where these are being introduced want that curb extention?

Given the length of the on street strip options that exist on University and throw in the houses that have had residential to business zoning changes ( Rogero Rd.) would an option be to create a curb extention at the beginning and an end of an identifiable  street then incorporate vertical parking spots such as is being used on Edgewood Ave. in front of the library.

How does curb extentions  impact future potential bike lanes?   

Just went back and looked at the pictures and believe that it will be evaluated on more of a case by case basis.

thelakelander

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2011, 06:53:58 AM »
Nice article Ennis. Curb extentions to slow traffic is interesting. Go over the Mathews to Arlington and all the free parking at the Town Center by McDonalds. Lots of open free parking.

Start walking and the small stores that you highlight. Question does a small business that has a parking space right outside their business want to lose that parking spot or two or does the small business where these are being introduced want that curb extention?

In most cases, you can't park your car that close to the curb any.  Typically, its just wasted pavement.

Quote
Given the length of the on street strip options that exist on University and throw in the houses that have had residential to business zoning changes ( Rogero Rd.) would an option be to create a curb extention at the beginning and an end of an identifiable  street then incorporate vertical parking spots such as is being used on Edgewood Ave. in front of the library.

I don't think you can get diagonal parking in on University without removing traffic lanes.

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How does curb extentions  impact future potential bike lanes?

With a context sensitive streets design approach, I think you can accommodate both.  Curb extensions would be the width of the parallel parking lanes.  Bike lanes can come by reducing the width of the traffic lanes.     

Quote
Just went back and looked at the pictures and believe that it will be evaluated on more of a case by case basis.

Yes, every street should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

acme54321

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2011, 07:27:44 AM »
You guys missed highlighting the best part of that area,  The Donut Shoppe.

thelakelander

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2011, 07:46:49 AM »
Where exactly is the Donut Shoppe, along this stretch?
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Bativac

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2011, 07:50:45 AM »
My dad grew up in Clifton. My grandma still lives in the house, but she's one of the last few "original" residents of that area of housing - a lot of the people have passed on or been moved into homes, and the houses have passed to their kids, who have rented them out or are trying to sell them at inflated prices, so the house is effectively abandoned. It's a shame.

That commercial district is in desperate need of some kind of revitalization. The crime over there is terrible - a friend of mine owns a bookshop and not too long ago, his entire central air conditioning unit was stolen. Not to mention the regular shoplifting, theft, vandalism, etc. My sister was assaulted a couple times near University and Merrill. So it's got a bad reputation. It's tough to talk about turning the area around because a lot of people who grew up there, like my dad and his family, are convinced that the area is too far gone and isn't worth saving. People who didn't grow up there and have no attachment to the area see it as little more than a dump. And the people who still live there either don't take pride in the appearance of their property or have not much left in the way of a customer base.

acme54321

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2011, 07:58:17 AM »
Where exactly is the Donut Shoppe, along this stretch?

It's jammed into the gate station at the north end of the district on University.  It's pretty easy to drive right by it, but they have the best donuts in town.

Airboy

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2011, 07:29:30 PM »
A wonderful article, as always. However, this humble reader would submit that very little was mentioned about Jacksonville University and what could be done about tying in this campus to the rest of Arlington. Have you been by it recently? It looks completely set apart from the community... food for thought?

north miami

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's \
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2011, 09:33:15 PM »

Willie Mick. Arlington modern day pioneer developer.Got to know him in the early 1990 's.I sold his boat.
At that time we were dangling between past and present.He was so proud of what he done did.


coredumped

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2011, 08:24:55 PM »
The whole town and country plaza should be torn down. It's really nothing but an eye soar.
Jags season ticket holder.

BackinJax05

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Re: Walkable Commercial Districts: Arlington's \
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2012, 06:52:52 AM »
The whole town and country plaza should be torn down. It's really nothing but an eye soar.

Amen to that! The sad thing is I remember when Town N Country was a nice place to shop, and eat. At the south end was Waldz Restaurant & Bakery. It was across from the Town N Country Theater.
Next to the theatre was a Pantry Pride grocery store, then Pic N Save. Somewhere in the strip was Utsey's Shoes, French Novelty Country Shop, and The Vogue (I think)
Years later Pic N Save expanded into the north end of the center.
Sadly, today Town N Country is a dump. Same goes for the old Thunderbird Hotel next door.