Author Topic: Downtown Bars: A History  (Read 22163 times)

BigBlackRod

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #75 on: January 07, 2018, 07:54:57 PM »
I know its an OLD thread,but Lord ,the memories it brought up ! I remember one night at the French Quarter we were all hanging around in the parking lot after closing and a truck full of rednecks pulled up and started running their mouths and this one transvestite named " Miss TT" took umbrage at their actions,whipped this big old .38 out of her gigantic purse ,and started popping off rounds ! Those boys left half their tread peeling out of there ! Picture a little black queen in gold lame standing in the middle of the street shooting ! Hilarious ! Miss Cleo,Miss TT,Rose,Jean,Theresa Anteya Larika Lakeesh ,Bea,so many old friends long gone,so many memories of good times.
I was a little white middle class burbs baby (15 !) and those girls took me in and protected me and befriended me and never once did me a dirty turn. And the Flamingo ,my God,how many times did my underage ass roll out of there drunker than a hoot owl clinging to the arms of my latest "love" ! Soldiers,dockworkers,businessmen,lawyers,they all went there looking for a trip on the dark side ! But the OP,now there was a legendary bar and my personal favorite. Does anyone remember Dons notorious After parties when the bar closed ? More than once I rolled out of those when the dawn was breaking. Caligula would have blushed at some of the antics in those after parties!
The Downtowner (remember Little Joe,the bartender? ) was another personal favorite,and it assuredly got wide open in there after the sun went down ! Remember the copper covered tables and the wallpaper with nudes ? I used to laugh so hard in there my stomach would hurt the next day. Some batshit crazy yet hilariously funny people ! I think a lot of those places closed because of the landing and the southbank opened up.I had some lovely times in River Rally,Harbormasters,Fat Tuesdays (Oooo,Triple Bypass,yum!) ,but they sure didn't beat the seedy ,seductive bars of my misspent youth.
JCB...wow, I tell you, I wasn't gay, maybe curious or quasi bisexual, but I (and we) had a ball back then. One reason I am replying; I run a private social service agency in Sarasota and Manatee Counties Florida. About 7 years ago, a kid, then 29, came to me for help; his name is Brendon (he is now 37), and after doing an intake on him, he told me he was from Jacksonville, and after further conversation, he told me that he was living with his roommate and close friend; I casually asked, being that he was from Jax, what his friends name was; he said DON STRICKLAND; I remembered a Don Strickland from back in the day who owned the old OP, and later the 3D; and they live here in our area in Bradenton. Brendon still calls and visits me from time to time and keeps in touch; it's a small, small world!
I also spent quite a bit of my twenties around those haunts. I knew Cleo and TT. Cleo is still with us, TT is not. We used to sit on that bus stop on Ashley and Main, smoking weed until we were zooted enough to go in the club and dance it off...

avonjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #76 on: January 08, 2018, 08:18:25 PM »
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I remember the Atlanta Rhythm Section opened for the Stones in the Gator Bowl in !975. Must have been about 70,000 there that day. For $10 you saw The Atlanta Rhythm Section, Chaka Khan with Rufus, The J Geils Band (w/Peter Wolf) and then the Rolling Stones. Quite the deal!

I was there for that!  When the Stones played 'Honkey Tonk Woman' two gigantic inflatable women sprung up on stage left and right. 

I know this is an old post but I was at the same Stones concert. But I recall the group was Labelle not Chaka Khan and Rufus.

avonjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #77 on: January 08, 2018, 08:33:30 PM »
Quote
I remember the Atlanta Rhythm Section opened for the Stones in the Gator Bowl in !975. Must have been about 70,000 there that day. For $10 you saw The Atlanta Rhythm Section, Chaka Khan with Rufus, The J Geils Band (w/Peter Wolf) and then the Rolling Stones. Quite the deal!

I was there for that!  When the Stones played 'Honkey Tonk Woman' two gigantic inflatable women sprung up on stage left and right. 

I know this is an old post but I was at the same Stones concert. But I recall the group was Labelle not Chaka Khan and Rufus.
I have been confused all these years. Labelle played with the Who the following August 1976 at the Gator Bowl. I saw Chaka Khan and Rufus again at the Coliseum a few years later.

marksjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #78 on: January 09, 2018, 01:22:26 AM »
I was not at the ‘89 Stones show (Gator Bowl) or the ‘76 Who shows so maybe Labelle opened for one or both of those (perhaps)?
But I was a youngster at the ‘75 show (my first of nine Stones concerts) and for sure it was Chaka at that show, not Labelle.
‘75 show was also infamous for the Stones demanding their fee to be paid in advance and in all cash ($500,000) after tiring of dealing with the antics of the notorious local promoter Sidney Drashin of ‘Jet Set Enterprises’.

This info below (that I found on the web) confirms correctly who played in ‘75. Four bands for $10!

August 2, 1975 ~ Gator Bowl ~ Jacksonville, FL

1975 Tour Of Americas. Atlanta Rhythm Section, Rufus with Chaka Kahn and J. Geils Band opened. Tony, his girlfriend Nancy, and Dave drove from Fort Lauderdale to Jacksonville, about 600 miles and the farthest Dave had ever driven to a show at that point of time. It was a real hot day and the show started early. As the day wore on, the crowd grew restless and rowdy. Security soaked them down with water hoses to cool them off. Of all the openers for the day, J. Geils played the best set. It was last time Dave ever saw them. The Stones came on just as it was getting dark. Dave remembers they played “Get Off My Cloud” with Billy Preston, who stole the show. Later, Preston got a chance to play a couple of numbers of his own, including the funky instrumental “Outta Space.” New member Ronnie Wood, filling in for the departed Mick Taylor, did a great job, playing second guitar alongside Keith. “Star Star” and “Ain’t To Proud To Beg” were new numbers added to the set. They also played “Fingerprint File” from “It’s Only Rock And Roll,” a real rarity. This would be Dave’s last Stones show for almost 15 years.

BobTheDog

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #79 on: January 18, 2018, 01:09:32 PM »
HU, the restaurant on the corner of Main and Duval was Nicola's

Nicola helped establish a fencing club in Jacksonville and got some of the high schools to offer it as a sport. I was in the club at DuPont, and met him through that. He was an admired person who ran an excellent restaurant with the best Italian food I've ever eaten. Thanks DogWalker for bringing Nicola's to mind.