Author Topic: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood  (Read 16294 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« on: January 19, 2011, 04:58:26 AM »
How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood



When examining housing data, two key components to look for include home prices and sales volume. However, here are five additional tips worth considering to find the next real-estate hot spot.


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http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-jan-how-to-spot-the-next-hot-neighborhood

Noone

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2011, 06:24:09 AM »
Thats why Hogans Creek is a GOLD MINE. Who wants to experience it? We won't talk about it. We'll make it happen. One of the biggest issues in the spring elections. 904-434-0839-Noone

acme54321

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2011, 06:50:22 AM »
My uncle has always lived in "hip" niehgborhoods.  He told me this is how he's generally seen them transform, ghetto->artists->gay->yuppies->families.  Each group seems to pave the way for the next and of course there is a lot of overlapping. Seems to be about right too.

And why does Hogan's creek come up in every thread nowadays?  Sorry to burst your bubble but it really isn't anywhere near the biggest issue in the mayor election.


letters and numbers

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2011, 07:03:22 AM »
Hey you know I agree with the story! Riverside has been a hot area for a minute and Springfield is arriving there but in a wierder way since its boom was bubble related. I cant think of any areas that could even be considered! Riverside has lots of artists gay yuppies and families and just a little ghetto. Springfield looks like it has a bunch of artists gays families but also still some ghetto. But hey thats I like those places the diversity!

Noone

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2011, 07:33:17 AM »

And why does Hogan's creek come up in every thread nowadays?  Sorry to burst your bubble but it really isn't anywhere near the biggest issue in the mayor election.



Tell me the mayoral candidate that doesn't think that access to the River is an issue because I'm not voting for them.

We are either going to promote our River or we aren't. We are a joke outside of Duval county. Two years ago. Two years ago I went to a meeting of FIND and the commissioners were awesome. Basically the question was if money was raised for a pocket pier floating dock at a waterfront public access street end would the members of FIND match the other 1/2 of the construction cost. The answer is YES. You need a sponsor. A city councilmember. It hasn't happened. Its not happening in Dist.4

Pieces of legislation are making its way through city council that the new Mayor and city council members will have their hands tied and the people of Jacksonville will have been ripped off again. 2010-856. 2010-675.

Our new slogan will be

Lets get to work. -Just not in Jacksonville.


Captain Zissou

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2011, 09:00:24 AM »
Quote
4. Ride The Rail

Once auto-centric Dallas is another example of how real-estate opportunities perk up alongside rail-based mass transit corridors.  Since launching its light rail system in 1996, Dallas has witnessed billions in transit-oriented development sprout up around its system.  With more rail lines planned for Dallas, Seattle, Charlotte and other cities, is the next hot neighborhood a future train stop around the corner from you?


No, because rail is never coming to Jax.  I'd love to know when metrojax started talking about rail.  Well, it would actually be the site we were all on before we came to metrojax.  Was that '05? Earlier?

I'm starting to lose faith in rail and Jax.  The next mayor needs to get our city on the right track and our citizens need to pull their heads out of the sand.  Jax's government and citizens are still living in 1997, the rest of the world is not.

dougskiles

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2011, 09:54:08 AM »

No, because rail is never coming to Jax.  I'd love to know when metrojax started talking about rail.  Well, it would actually be the site we were all on before we came to metrojax.  Was that '05? Earlier?

I'm starting to lose faith in rail and Jax.  The next mayor needs to get our city on the right track and our citizens need to pull their heads out of the sand.  Jax's government and citizens are still living in 1997, the rest of the world is not.

Don't lose faith yet, Captain.  The groundswell is coming.  Did you read John Mica's comments in the T-U this morning?  A direct reference to the Skyway and how we can make it useful by connecting commuter rail.  We are very close to critical mass.  Yes, there is always going to be opposition.  But at some point, there is no longer a market for what those people are selling and their influence begins to dry up.  Generation 'Y' will be the largest consumer in the years to come.  Corporations and politicians will figure this out quickly.  The smart ones already have.

Shwaz

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2011, 10:11:59 AM »
Quote
4. Ride The Rail

Once auto-centric Dallas is another example of how real-estate opportunities perk up alongside rail-based mass transit corridors.  Since launching its light rail system in 1996, Dallas has witnessed billions in transit-oriented development sprout up around its system.  With more rail lines planned for Dallas, Seattle, Charlotte and other cities, is the next hot neighborhood a future train stop around the corner from you?


No, because rail is never coming to Jax.  I'd love to know when metrojax started talking about rail.  Well, it would actually be the site we were all on before we came to metrojax.  Was that '05? Earlier?

I'm starting to lose faith in rail and Jax.  The next mayor needs to get our city on the right track and our citizens need to pull their heads out of the sand.  Jax's government and citizens are still living in 1997, the rest of the world is not.

+1 Gen Y will be in retirement homes down in Boca before the first commuter station is up & running.
And though I long to embrace, I will not replace my priorities: humour, opinion, a sense of compassion, creativity and a distaste for fashion.

Springfield Chicken

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2011, 11:32:28 AM »
If the city were to do a better job attracting and promoting business to downtown it would be a good start.  Those intown, hip neighborhoods need incentives in the beginning and support to get them on a solid footing.  It would be cheaper in the long run to promote intown living than to continue to build super highways to get to more suburban sprawl.
That being said, Avondale, Riverside, and Springfield are quietly doing their own thing and attracting people who choose to live and work there in growing numbers.  Yay!

north miami

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2011, 11:51:06 AM »
And why does Hogan's creek come up in every thread nowadays?
[/quote]

Why not?

Because it must.

Everything must change.Our communities are a sum of their parts.We have profoundly rare and potentially valuable parts that have been submerged within the past image of ourselves during an age of overall decline.In a positive new practice of refusal we will see the likes of Hogan's Creek awareness emerge.We simply refuse to go about the routine course.

It is really pretty simple.We can never do just one thing.Hogan's Creek above all can be simply viewed as a test.
Raise the bar.Uplift Hogan's Creek and the entire community benefits.Restorative Justice.

Even Avondale has some work to do in this department-the southwesterly boundary of RAP is defined by Fishweir Creek- an embarrassing poster child screaming for restoration.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2011, 01:16:49 PM by north miami »

simms3

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2011, 01:00:46 PM »
Avondale, Riverside, and Springfield will never become "hip" neighborhoods like those found in other cities until the historic preservation groups RAP and SPAR realize that it's ok to mix new lofts and new higher density buildings in with the old.  The Shoppes of Avondale could be so much better with more activity if it were expanded and "densified", but that would mean that a few houses would have to go and gasp, perhaps a parking garage put in.  5 Points the same.  Springfield is so unique and cool, but I tire very quickly of the same old architecture (new...SRG, and old) on every lot.  I would love to see some more cement, glass, brick, etc.

Atlanta has just as many old, historic neighborhoods as Springfield, Riverside, and Avondale (actually probably more), but when you go to them you can see shotgun houses next to brand new 4-5 story apartments/lofts with ground level retail.  These would never be allowed by SPAR or RAP, and if they were, they would probaby have to "look" like one of the old 1920s or before houses instead of adding a new, modern mix.

After the recent threads/developments posted unfolding in San Marco, that will easily become the first hip, dense, mixed use neighborhood in Jacksonville simply because that's what they want and they don't have to cowtow to San Marco Preservation.

Jax Beach could be hip if that lady from Hunstville ever decided to leave and they raised the height limit from 35 ft.  The only problem there is that every building looks absurdly ugly (faux brown stucco) and they do not address the street.  That will also have to be changed with a design review board.

We want hip, but we have people and organizations in our city that literally prevent hip from happening, and then we wonder why every Gen Yer moves to Gate Parkway where places like Tapestry Park are going up IN SUBURBIA.
Bothering locals and trolling boards since 2005

simms3

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2011, 01:06:34 PM »
Also, I hate to say it, but there really is no reason for rail in Jax until we do increase our densities.  Having grown up in Ortega/Avondale, maybe I would take a street car from Avondale to Riverside, maybe, but there is never any traffic and I love my car.  All we have are single-family homes in most of our neighborhoods.  The only dense area is near 5 Points, and if you live there you can walk everywhere.

Commuter rail?  I'm worried it will be a huge failure like Nashville's with fewer than a thousand riders a day simply because our traffic is nowhere near bad enough and our density is not there.

If RAP and SPAR are able to press on, expect the only dense, hip places to be San Marco and certain areas of the Southside, which will still be car-centric.  We got a few high rises built downtown, but during the last boom what would have made a larger impact is higher density developments in the surrounding neighborhoods, not unlike Chelsea lofts or 1661 Riverside.  But do they all have to look like they're old when it's so obvious they're not?
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fsujax

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2011, 01:10:40 PM »
Nashville's commuter rail ridership has actually been on the increase breaking over 1,100 last month. 100 away from their goal of 1,200 riders a day. The density argument has been debunked by Charlotte alone! You do not need density of housing units for commuter rail to work, what you do need is a dense employment center.

thelakelander

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2011, 01:44:30 PM »
Circulators like streetcars build density. If you want more density, you put in the type of transportation network that generates it.  A trip to a city like Memphis or Portland proves this.  Instead about worrying about density, more focus should be given to creating seamless front door connectivity between walkable destinations. Do this and you'll find that density in the form of more complementing walkable development will begin to grow around your investment.
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letters and numbers

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Re: How To Spot The Next Hot Neighborhood
« Reply #14 on: January 19, 2011, 02:21:46 PM »
Avondale, Riverside, and Springfield will never become "hip" neighborhoods like those found in other cities until the historic preservation groups RAP and SPAR realize that it's ok to mix new lofts and new higher density buildings in with the old.  The Shoppes of Avondale could be so much better with more activity if it were expanded and "densified", but that would mean that a few houses would have to go and gasp, perhaps a parking garage put in.  5 Points the same.  Springfield is so unique and cool, but I tire very quickly of the same old architecture (new...SRG, and old) on every lot.  I would love to see some more cement, glass, brick, etc.

Atlanta has just as many old, historic neighborhoods as Springfield, Riverside, and Avondale (actually probably more), but when you go to them you can see shotgun houses next to brand new 4-5 story apartments/lofts with ground level retail.  These would never be allowed by SPAR or RAP, and if they were, they would probaby have to "look" like one of the old 1920s or before houses instead of adding a new, modern mix.

After the recent threads/developments posted unfolding in San Marco, that will easily become the first hip, dense, mixed use neighborhood in Jacksonville simply because that's what they want and they don't have to cowtow to San Marco Preservation.

Jax Beach could be hip if that lady from Hunstville ever decided to leave and they raised the height limit from 35 ft.  The only problem there is that every building looks absurdly ugly (faux brown stucco) and they do not address the street.  That will also have to be changed with a design review board.

We want hip, but we have people and organizations in our city that literally prevent hip from happening, and then we wonder why every Gen Yer moves to Gate Parkway where places like Tapestry Park are going up IN SUBURBIA.

Hey you know I read that a modern house going to go up on walnut street in springfield! Thats friggin awesome right?