Author Topic: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando  (Read 11679 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« on: January 05, 2011, 03:01:39 AM »
Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando



Metro Jacksonville visits Central Florida's most walkable neighborhood: Downtown Orlando

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2011-jan-elements-of-urbanism-downtown-orlando

Captain Zissou

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2011, 09:14:17 AM »


This looks exactly like the Avondale strip.  I actually thought Ennis had included it for a compare and contrast between Avondale and Orlando.



Until I saw this and realized that is nothing like Avondale.  Why can't we incorporate dense development and infill into our historic areas like San Marco and Avondale.  5 points does this fairly well, San Marco barely does it, but Avondale falls completely flat in that regard. 

The Shoppes of Avondale's ultimate potential is limited due to its surroundings, but places like 5 points, Murray Hill, St Nicholas, Lakewood, San Marco, and Springfield need to develop master plans that feature residential or office over retail, a walkable scale, and pedestrian friendly layouts to maximize their potential as places that we can really call home and be proud of.

thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2011, 09:25:06 AM »
I'm actually suprised that despite going through the recent real estate boom, more of that type of mixed-use infill development didn't take place in urban Jax.  Little infill projects like that now litter the inner cities of the South's other similar sized metropolitan areas.
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Singejoufflue

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2011, 09:39:31 AM »
Perhaps it's a bias against Disney (or because of), but so much of DT Orlando seems plain old fake.  Certainly, it "looks" nice, but in a very meticulous "happiest place on earth" kind of way.  Let's not bring that kind of development in.

duvaldude08

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2011, 10:05:10 AM »
^^^I agree. Orlando looks so fake and fancy. It looks nice, but doesnt seem like reality. The look of the city only fits in because of disney. If Jacksonville looked like that, it would be weird. LMAO
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krazeeboi

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2011, 10:06:56 AM »
^That's because it's new. The newer urban developments in cities like Charlotte, Atlanta, Nashville, Houston, Austin, Dallas, etc. look pretty much the same. Jacksonville could very much use the functional urbanism that developments like those provide.

thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2011, 10:14:39 AM »
Due to Jax's age, these same developments in the inner city would create a completely different atmosphere.  Instead of complete blocks of new development, there would be a unique mix of old and new with different architectural styles and building materials (assuming existing development isn't demolished).
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Keith-N-Jax

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2011, 10:33:01 AM »
Fake and Fancy now that's a new one. I'd rather have that than empty store fronts, empty lots, grass parking lots and no real plans to accomplish anything before the world ends. Very hard to get anything accomplished here when their so busy arguing over parking spaces.

dougskiles

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2011, 10:37:42 AM »
Until I saw this and realized that is nothing like Avondale.  Why can't we incorporate dense development and infill into our historic areas like San Marco and Avondale.  5 points does this fairly well, San Marco barely does it, but Avondale falls completely flat in that regard. 

The Shoppes of Avondale's ultimate potential is limited due to its surroundings, but places like 5 points, Murray Hill, St Nicholas, Lakewood, San Marco, and Springfield need to develop master plans that feature residential or office over retail, a walkable scale, and pedestrian friendly layouts to maximize their potential as places that we can really call home and be proud of.

Hopefully, you will be seeing it soon in San Marco.  SMPS and COJ P&DD are in the midst of a smart growth plan, San Marco by Design, for the northern portions of San Marco.  We will provide updates of our progress and welcome all participants.  Some of the key elements so far have been improving walkability, bike routes, river access, allowing more density/height in defined areas and Transit Oriented Development that would result from an extension of the Skyway.  These are not 'pie-in-the-sky' plans.  With the support of the local business owners, residents and city leaders, this will become reality.

Stay tuned...

Bativac

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2011, 10:58:36 AM »
Fake and Fancy now that's a new one. I'd rather have that than empty store fronts, empty lots, grass parking lots and no real plans to accomplish anything before the world ends. Very hard to get anything accomplished here when their so busy arguing over parking spaces.

Gotta agree with you there. Go ahead and stick some Disney-esque businesses downtown... instead of empty and abandoned office buildings. (Just don't tear down anything to build it!!!)

My wife and I go to Orlando all the time and have recently "discovered" downtown. Generally we stick to I-Drive and the Universal/Disney areas but downtown has a lot of interesting areas to explore. (Though we seldom see more than a few people roaming the streets on Saturday afternoons.)

Mad Cow Theatre

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2011, 03:00:35 PM »
Thanks for mentioning Mad Cow.  We've been in Downtown for 10 years and our current location since 2003.  In the upcoming year, we're moving to 54 W. Church Street and will be expanding both of our theatres as well as lobby and backstage areas.

Right now, we produce 10 shows, a 3-week long cabaret festival, and other special events in our home downtown, bringing over 21,000 people to the urban core annually, driving over one million dollars in incremental income for local businesses.

There is more information on the move here: http://orlandotheater.wordpress.com/2010/12/06/city-agreement-today-will-help-mad-cow-move-to-new-home/
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 03:06:12 PM by Mad Cow Theatre »

Lunican

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2011, 10:52:32 PM »
Does anyone know why they moved the steam engine? It used to be much closer to Church St.



I-10east

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2011, 04:18:08 AM »
I actually wouldn't call DT Orlando "fake & fancy", To me it looks like a DT of a typical small/mid sized city; Kinda "youngish" though. IMO Orlando's DT looks more "small towny" than the city actually is, a growing metropolis. Now O-Town's hotel suburban areas "fake & fancy" would definitely fit the criteria. Far as I see in the future, DT Orlando will continue to get vastly overshadowed by the theme parks there. Face it, the Amway Center is the main reason to go there. MJers complain about Jax's highways, and State St etc, try I-4; DT Orlando probably wouldn't even be worthy enough to be considered a whistle stop in the minds of millions of out of towners; The main big stops on their minds, are Sea World, Universal, WDW, Wet & Wild etc.  
« Last Edit: January 06, 2011, 05:25:23 AM by I-10east »

thelakelander

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2011, 06:48:48 AM »
The historic core of DT Orlando is pretty small.  This is due to the fact that Orlando didn't really begin to grow until after Disney opened in 1971.  By that time, people were already building on the outskirts of town.  Much of that land has been annexed by Orlando since then.

Orlando 1950 Population: 52,367

Tampa 1950 Population: 124,681

Jacksonville 1950 Population: 204,275

Miami 1950 Population: 249,276
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DemocraticNole

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Downtown Orlando
« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2011, 09:48:55 AM »
It's amazing how much Orlando is ahead of the curve when it comes to getting infill projects and things like light rail. They blow Jacksonville and my city of Tampa out of the water. Very frustrating that we can't get that in our cities.