Author Topic: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables  (Read 2876 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« on: December 17, 2010, 03:13:41 AM »
Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables



Metro Jacksonville explores a city famous for its strict zoning regulations: Coral Gables.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-dec-elements-of-urbanism-coral-gables

simms3

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2010, 04:25:42 AM »
Thanks for the thread.  I love CG and it's the only place in Miami I can tolerate.  I'm down once or twice a year (there/the Grove).  My mom used to live a couple blocks from the Biltmore Hotel before moving to a high rise in Coconut Grove and my dad lived there as well (it's where my parents met and got hitched before moving to Jax).  I do wish you got some of Coconut Grove (Cocowalk, Bayshore, Cutler Rd, Main Rd area where the infamous Mutiny is) and the beautiful Granada Golf Course.  I know I am being picky and you get so many photos, but you missed the Venetian Baths!  And Coral Way leading into Brickell (as you know Coral Way is the Miracle Mile in Coral Gables, but is walkable and urban all the way into Brickell).

Great tour though, and Coral Gables is really the only place in Miami that makes me jealous.  Frankly I think we should loosen up RAP and get some good new architecture in and a mix of uses.  The thing about Coral Gables is it is like its own city, and it gets it right.  It has a good mix of old and new, and frankly it's not so spotty like Avondale Riverside and Ortega are (though you don't want to pass Calle Ocho to the North).  Riverside and Avondale are not like their own cities and cannot survive without Jacksonville.

There's even a Senior Frogs in Coconut Grove on Main, and in my opinion anyone who knows better would skip out on the beach when visiting Miami and head straight to Coconut Grove or Coral Gables for dining and entertainment/nightlife (less of a fist bumping crowd too :)).
Bothering locals and trolling boards since 2005

dougskiles

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2010, 05:11:36 AM »
You can't forget about the "U"!  As much as I don't like the 'canes, the campus is a big part of the city.  So, another stat to add would be a comparison of the local universities:

University of Miami: 15,000 students, est. 1925
Jacksonville University: 3,000 students, est. 1934

tufsu1

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2010, 09:10:47 AM »
oh...don't worry, the Lakelander would never forget the "U"

Actionville

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2010, 12:44:48 PM »
Somewhat of a side note, the parking garages in coral gables are awesome. Municipally owned, cost 1$ an hour. If people are just stopping in for a drink or dinner, they're not gonna pay a 5$ flat rate like in downtown jax. the garages are Well designed too; lined with retail, blend right in with the surrounding buildings

simms3

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2010, 01:11:27 PM »
^^^Second, and at least one where I routinely park my car is operated 24 hours a day with security.  I think there's a max rate of $10 or $15 if you park longer than 10 hours.

I do know that Miracle Mile suffered pretty drastically in the 90s and is still recovering from that (on the retail side of things, office has definitely picked up).  Miracle Mile at its worst (back in the 90s) still makes anything in Jax look like the poorhouse.
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Ocklawaha

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2010, 02:10:04 PM »

CORAL GABLES


"compare the above car with this one seen in Miami Beach."

How many knew that Coral Gables introduced HIGH SPEED ELECTRIC RAIL to Florida? The traction companies had two lines out to Coral Gables and one was universally know as "The Coral Gables High Speed Line." This photo is that of a high speed car on a downtown street.
Quote
Unfortunately, what came to be “the local line” was also somewhat slow for those making the complete city to city trip and to remedy that situation, Mr. Merrick embarked on another of his great achievements:  the building of a high speed interurban electric railway utilizing the median of Coral Way (where the great banyans now reside) swinging north on that leg of Coral Way and then curving east an Southwest 13th Street the couple of blocks to Southwest Second Avenue, whence the interurbans would cross the Miami River and head north to Flagler, where they would turn east and proceed to loop around downtown Miami back to their connecting to the Gables trackage.

There were several short and short-lived extensions but the one that was well ahead of its time was the Bird Road line which went west on Bird almost to 72nd Avenue.  A paucity of riders would doom that line quite early but the two main lines soldiered on until the very late in the season November 4th, 1935 hurricane destroyed most of the system’s overhead and left several trolleys stranded out on the line.  They were pulled in by trucks and the Coral Gables Rapid Transit Company, along with so many of the other great dreams of the 1920s, met its unhappy end in the middle of the worst Depression the United States had ever experienced.
source: http://www.sunpostweekly.com/2010/04/15/the-time-of-the-trolley-part-2-coral-gables/

OCKLAWAHA

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2010, 02:30:39 PM »
Now the Coral Gables "trolleys" do the same thing as Jax, buses dressed up in cute streetcar costumes

Ocklawaha

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2010, 03:11:10 PM »
They don't really even qualify as buses being that they are built on very cheap potato chip truck engine and chassis assemblies which of course make them ride like potato chip trucks.

While they can provide a very basic bus like function, they probably have a better fit in the amusement park business or the circus. Must be because when I see the word trolley in one of the brochures I know I'm dealing with clowns.

People continue to write MJ and tell us how our "trolleys" are a good start toward having streetcars, and that they serve as attractions to downtown.

Imagine you and the family are sailing down the interstate and you see the first of 20 billboards that state "Meet and get your photographs with the entire Jacksonville Jaguar Team, FREE, at the next Gate Station, exit XX." Anyone following football is likely to exit and head for the pumps, then they see the cardboard cutouts of the Jaguar players stapled to stakes all over the stations entry. Let me guess, you jump out with your camera and run for autographs? More likely you go to the office and unload on the proprietor!   Same thing with plywood "trolleys."


OCKLAWAHA

Debbie Thompson

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Re: Elements of Urbanism: Coral Gables
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2010, 10:38:09 AM »
I grew up near Red Road and Bird Road, on the edge of Coral Gables. We worshiped at Coral Gables Congregational Church and shopped on Miracle Mile in the 1950's and 1960's.  Thanks for this article.  It was so nice to see the Gables again and relive those memories.