Author Topic: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation  (Read 12272 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« on: December 15, 2010, 03:18:07 AM »
2030 Mobility Plan Presentation



The following presentation provides a brief overview of the 2030 Mobility Plan and was the focal point of Tuesday's Jacksonville City Council and Planning Commission's Joint Mobility Plan Workshop. If adopted, this work could become a ground breaking point in transforming the quality of life in Jacksonville.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-dec-2030-mobility-plan-presentation

Hurricane

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2010, 07:04:54 AM »
I look forward to riding my bike to work one day, that would be great!  The intersections are currently WAY too dangerous for this to happen right now though. 

Just adding a 2 foot shoulder and saying it is a bike lane is a start, but that is still extremely dangerous for the biker.  There needs to be a barrier of some sort between the bike lane and the car lane. 

Talk to anyone who has biked more than 200 miles in these bike lanes and every rider will have a story of a very close call.  I had one, and I know I'm not alone.  I was training for the MS150, had on all of the safety gear, and even had 2 lights on the back of the bike.  Some driver still clipped my handle bar and I went into the ditch...

Ocklawaha

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2010, 08:36:33 AM »
It can happen in cars too! When daughter Trilby was about 7 years old we were talking to a Santa Fe train crew in Wheatland, Oklahoma. They decided it would be fun to bring her up into the engine for a short ride.

Wheatland is an old prairie town on the SW edge of Oklahoma City today, with the requisite old concrete highway right alongside the tracks. The engineer seated her on his seat IN THE WINDOW, and told her which handles to operate while he was sitting behind her out of sight. the conductor and I had a perfect view. As it happened one of our neighbors was sailing down the highway next to the train. He glanced at the engine - looked away - then back at the engine with a face of terror... RIGHT OFF INTO THE DITCH!  Realizing he wasn't hurt the crew, Trilby and I, just about died laughing.



OCKLAWAHA

thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2010, 08:58:11 AM »
The Bicycle network plan includes a series of multiuse paths.  Here is an article we ran a few months back on the bicycle network:

http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2010-apr-2030-mobility-plan-bicycle-network
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dougskiles

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2010, 01:22:37 PM »
Lakelander, do you know if the Mobility Plan includes credits for an existing use on a property that will be redeveloped?  I did a quick search for the word 'credit' in the documents posted on the city website and nothing came up relating to this.  Surely there would be some mechanism to promote redevelopment as opposed to greenfield development.

thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2010, 01:42:00 PM »
I would have to go back and look through the report to see what it actually states but it does account for and recognize the difference between redevelopment and greenfield development.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

urbaknight

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2010, 02:01:32 PM »
Is greenfield development suburban development? (strip malls, condos complexes, huge surface parking lots and no walkablity)

thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2010, 02:05:05 PM »
A greenfield development can be either sustainable or sprawl based.  In Jax, they tend to be suburban strip malls, gated subdivisions, and horizontal structures with huge surface parking lots.

In many disciplines a greenfield is a project that lacks any constraints imposed by prior work. The analogy is to that of construction on greenfield land where there is no need to remodel or demolish an existing structure.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenfield_project
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daveindesmoines1

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2010, 06:13:26 PM »
I have an elderly parent living in Jacksonville. Her eyes are going bad. She should drive as little as possible. We have a huge amount of baby boomers soon will not be able to drive, by 2020 as well as 2030. Many other drivers should not be on the road as well. Retirees will need to get to grocery stores, pharmacy stores, doctors offices, and regional specialists.
Your city should do marketing research to find people and the times they need to get around. They should ask what times would it be useful for mini buses and vans to be available for people to use. Filling a survey could be awarded with prescriptions discounts, food coupons, and restaurant meals. This way better bus services could be developed from these surveys.
Perhaps school buses could be utilized for regional transportation for people at other times than school mornings and afternoons. This way schools and the Department of the Elderly could share the bus costs.
Many people who should not drive for various reasons, the following is proposed.
First, there needs to be transportation for people to get to work as well as places mentioned above. This will reduce temptation for people to drive when they should not. Perhaps people who lose their driver’s license could be handed pamphlets and surveys for your much improved bus services.
Second, is there also a way that before one fills the tank with gas, they need to swipe their driver’s license at the gas pumps? This would be required before paying in cash or credit card. New special gas pump readers would have to be installed that can read driver’s licenses. If they have no valid driver’s license – no gas! Perhaps eventually, your credit card could also have current driver’s license info. This way you will only need to swipe one card to get gas. Your driver’s license database would need to be connected to your banks database.
We have a huge amount of baby boomers soon will not be able to drive, by 2020 as well as 2030. Many other drivers should not be on the road as well. Cities need to look for better transportation between now and 2030 – when many baby boomers will not be able to get around.

tufsu1

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2010, 09:22:20 PM »
Lakelander, do you know if the Mobility Plan includes credits for an existing use on a property that will be redeveloped?  I did a quick search for the word 'credit' in the documents posted on the city website and nothing came up relating to this.  Surely there would be some mechanism to promote redevelopment as opposed to greenfield development.

I believe the plan is set up for fees to only be paid for net new trips....so credits for pass-by and internal capture would help.

As for redevelopment, state statutes require that 110% of the previous development's trips be credited automatically to the new development.

tufsu1

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2010, 09:23:48 PM »
Is greenfield development suburban development? (strip malls, condos complexes, huge surface parking lots and no walkablity)

greenfields are new development sites...brownfields are redevelopments w/ contaminated land...greyfields are redevelopments w/ no contamination

spuwho

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2010, 10:56:09 PM »
Understand that COJ is funding this so it will be Duval centric, but it ignores traffic patterns from North Clay & St John's Counties into South Duval.

I support Mobility Planning for Jacksonville proper and it does need to move forward, also am a firm believer that any long term solutions be regional in scope.

Since baby steps are needed before the big ones, it's time to put some shoes on.

thelakelander

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2010, 10:59:47 PM »
What traffic patterns from surrounding counties does it ignore? It recognizes that there are committed road projects throughout South Duval and includes transit projects such as commuter rail along Philips and Roosevelt to assist with that regional movement.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2010, 11:03:43 PM by thelakelander »
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dougskiles

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2010, 07:03:16 AM »
A little off-topic, but after the workshop, we were talking to Bill about the commuter rail and he said that the new owner of the FEC lines is very interested in a passenger service.  I got the impression that this company may even consider operating it privately.  Anyone know more about this?

spuwho

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Re: 2030 Mobility Plan Presentation
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2010, 08:23:35 PM »
What traffic patterns from surrounding counties does it ignore? It recognizes that there are committed road projects throughout South Duval and includes transit projects such as commuter rail along Philips and Roosevelt to assist with that regional movement.

I was looking at the traffic density analysis graphic. It shows only Duval. I was trying to relate density patterns coming out of Clay, over the Buckman and into Duval primarily. As a compare, I also wanted to see the density coming in from St John's County. Small, medium, large? 

That was it.