Visions of Vibrancy: Seattle

April 23, 2015 10 comments Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article

The vibrancy of cities comes in all shapes and sizes. Many believe that what works in internationally known cosmopolitan settings may not be applicable for cities such as Jacksonville, which have struggled with embracing walkability. If we look hard enough, we may realize that this type of view should be challenged. Despite the diversity around the globe, all lively cities, downtowns, and urban cores have something in common: being pedestrian friendly. Today, Metro Jacksonville visits the streets of a Pacific Coast peer: Seattle.



Retail Core

Downtown Seattle's Retail Core is home to the city's largest concentration of department stores and retail shops. It is also anchored by the Washington State Convention Center.

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The Seattle Central Library opened in 2004 and was designed by Rem Koolhaas and Joshua Prince-Ramus of OMA in a joint venture with LMN Architects and Front Inc. Facade Consultants. In 2007, the building was voted #108 on the American Institute of Architects' (AIA) list of Americans' 150 favorite structures in the U.S.

Jacksonville Connection: Jacksonville's Main Library opened in 2005 and was designed by architect Robert A.M. Stern.

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The Washington State Convention Center opened on June 18, 1988. Featuring a 205,700-square foot exhibition hall, the convention center is a multi-level, mixed-use center featuring theatres, retail, dining and hotel space in addition to meeting facilities.

Jacksonville Connection: The Prime Osborn Convention Center is an isolated meeting facility offering 78,500-square feet of exhibition space. Completed in 1986, it struggles because of a lack of complementing uses within a walkable setting.

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