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Author Topic: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?  (Read 2305 times)

stephendare

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National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« on: November 29, 2008, 04:00:14 PM »
This is a short blurb from the National Register of Historic Places.

This is supposed to be what the Historic District is about.  It is why people were willing to come back to the neighborhood, spend restoration funds, approve facade grants, redo main street, and in general support and love the effort that has went into restoring the Springfield district.

It was never supposed to be about land flipping and developer driven new construction.

Ask yourself if the neighborhood is still on track as stewards of the tens of millions that the taxpayers of Jacksonville have spent on it.

Is the neighborhood really driving to preserve and restore the historic integrity of the area?

Or are we watching one historic structure after another crumble while hundreds of thousands of dollars are spent on a crime fund to benefit a few?   

It has been 6 years since I coordinated the rephotographing of all the structures in the historic district for the National Register Update.

With hundreds of manhours from UNF we got the entire inventory photographed and organized.  We even provided the entire body of work digitally on cds.   Why arent they available online yet?

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The National Register nomination process starts with your State Historic Preservation Office* (SHPO). Contact your SHPO or check their web page for National Register information, research materials, and necessary forms to begin the nomination process.

How are Properties Evaluated?

To be considered eligible, a property must meet the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. This involves examining the property’s age, integrity, and significance.

    * Age and Integrity. Is the property old enough to be considered historic (generally at least 50 years old) and does it still look much the way it did in the past?
    * Significance. Is the property associated with events, activities, or developments that were important in the past? With the lives of people who were important in the past? With significant architectural history, landscape history, or engineering achievements? Does it have the potential to yield information through archeological investigation about our past?


National Register Listing Process

    * Nominations can be submitted to your SHPO from property owners, historical societies, preservation organizations, governmental agencies, and other individuals or groups. Official National Register Nomination Forms are downloadable or from your State Historic Preservation Office. National Register Bulletins can also provide guidance on how to document and evaluate certain types of properties. Sample Nominations provide additional useful information.
    * The SHPO notifies affected property owners and local governments and solicits public comment. If the owner (or a majority of owners for a district nomination) objects, the property cannot be listed but may be forwarded to the National Park Service for a Determination of Eligibility (DOE).
    * Proposed nominations are reviewed by your state’s historic preservation office and the state’s National Register Review Board. The length of the state process varies but will take a minimum of 90 days.
    * Complete nominations, with certifying recommendations, are submitted by the state to the National Park Service in Washington, D.C. for final review and listing by the Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places. The National park Service makes a listing decision within 45 days.

Benefits & Owner Information

Listing in the National Register of Historic Places provides formal recognition of a property’s historical, architectural, or archeological significance based on national standards used by every state. Benefits include:

    * Becoming part of the National Register Archives, a public, searchable database that provides a wealth of research information.
    * Encouraging preservation of historic resources by documenting a property’s historic significance.
    * Providing opportunities for specific preservation incentives, such as:
      > Federal preservation grants for planning and rehabilitation
      > Federal investment tax credits
      > Preservation easements to nonprofit organizations
      > International Building Code fire and life safety code alternatives
    * Possible State tax benefit and grant opportunities. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office for historic property incentives available within your state.
    * Involvement from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation when a Federal agency project may affect historic property.
    * Find out information on the care and maintenance of your historic property through various NPS Preservation Briefs and Tech Notes.
    * Network with other historic property owners, tour historic areas, or chat with preservationists through Conferences, Workshops, and Preservation Organizations.
    * Celebrate your listing by ordering a bronze plaque that distinguishes your property as listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Your Property Rights

    * National Register listing places no obligations on private property owners. There are no restrictions on the use, treatment, transfer, or disposition of private property.
    * National Register listing does not lead to public acquisition or require public access.
    * A property will not be listed if, for individual properties, the owner objects, or for districts, a majority of property owners object.
    * National Register listing does not automatically invoke local historic district zoning or local landmark designation.
    * Federal Regulation 36 CFR 60 authorizes the National Register of Historic Places.
    * Contact your State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) for any specific state rules or regulations

Federal Agency Historic Preservation

In conjunction with the Secretary of the Interior, all Federal agencies establish their own historic preservation programs for the identification, evaluation, and protection of historic properties as mandated in Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act. These individual agency programs vary greatly in scope, depending on the degree to which the agency owns, controls, or affects historic properties. The NPS Federal Agency Preservation Assistance Program carries out a number of activities to assist Federal agencies in meeting their historic preservation responsibilities. Check with the Federal Preservation Officer (FPO) within a particular federal agency for additional information.
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stephendare

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2008, 04:09:02 PM »
http://www.nps.gov/nr/about.htm
Quote
Welcome to
the National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Register is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect our historic and archeological resources. Properties listed in the Register include districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects that are significant in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture. The National Register is administered by the National Park Service, which is part of the U.S. Department of the Interior. For more information on how to nominate a property to the National Register, visit our Listing a property page.

Included among the over 80,000 listings that make up the National Register are: 

    * All historic areas in the National Park System;
    * Over 2,400 National Historic Landmarks, which have been designated by the Secretary of the Interior because of their importance to all Americans;
    * Properties across the country that have been nominated by governments, organizations, and individuals because they are significant to the nation, to a state, or to a community.
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urbanjvl

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2008, 04:14:55 PM »
The city has to approve any demolition of historic structures correct? 

stephendare

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2008, 04:23:34 PM »
no.   

Technically the answer is 'probably'.  But in reality the answer is 'no'.

We documented the KBJ demolition of the historic brick church downtown, and of course there was the recent demolition of 7th and Main (right in the middle of the oldest historic district in the city), but those arent the only options.

The city itself has destroyed buildings under the provisions of the DART program, and there is always good old fashioned 'demolition by neglect'.
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urbanjvl

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2008, 04:25:28 PM »
The city neglected Springfield for decades.  

Tens of millions???

Based on the increase in property taxes is Springfield get improvements that they don't deserve?  

stephendare

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2008, 04:31:14 PM »
The neighborhood did not generate the tax revenues that were allocated to the neighborhoods renovations.

The official district is only a square mile.  Most of it was off the tax rolls or didnt yield much revenue.

Within the district itself, the majority of the cities money was spent on crime and basic human services.

Tens of millions have been spent on the renovation from public coffers above and beyond the monies that are required to be spent.  Trust me, Riverside did not have the same resources that Springfield was given.

The question isnt whether someone 'deserves' something, ---whatever that means  ;) -- The money was approved on the basis of restoring the historic district.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2008, 04:37:23 PM by stephendare »
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AlexS

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2008, 12:35:38 PM »
It has been 6 years since I coordinated the rephotographing of all the structures in the historic district for the National Register Update.

With hundreds of manhours from UNF we got the entire inventory photographed and organized.  We even provided the entire body of work digitally on cds.   Why arent they available online yet?
Who were these CD's provided to ? How can I get a copy ?

stephendare

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2008, 01:14:41 PM »
SPAR has them.  They were supposed to be online within a few months.  They were also supposed to be available to any who called.

They are partially, in all fairness to SPAR.  I was able to get digital copies of Old Boomtown from both 2002 and 1984.  I would assume that you can still call for them.
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sheclown

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #8 on: November 30, 2008, 01:37:54 PM »
The neighborhood did not generate the tax revenues that were allocated to the neighborhoods renovations.

The official district is only a square mile.  Most of it was off the tax rolls or didnt yield much revenue.

Within the district itself, the majority of the cities money was spent on crime and basic human services.

Tens of millions have been spent on the renovation from public coffers above and beyond the monies that are required to be spent. 
Trust me, Riverside did not have the same resources that Springfield was given.

The question isnt whether someone 'deserves' something, ---whatever that means  ;) -- The money was approved on the basis of restoring the historic district.

Was this the facade grant money?  I know the city had to have poured tons of money in for that.  That and SHARP.  I wonder how much the city spent?  Anyone know?

stephendare

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2008, 05:16:50 PM »
SHARP, The Main Street Project, The Facade grants (both residential and commercial) not to mention the Northwest Development Trust Fund among many others.
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sheclown

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2008, 06:12:41 PM »
I know that the facade and SHARP really kicked-started this neighborhood.  When every street had a dumpster out front and hammers flinging around, everyone wanted to invest and restore.


stephendare

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #11 on: November 30, 2008, 06:22:48 PM »
No kidding, Sheclown.

Let me ask a question.  Do you think that the City would have put up the same money for the development of Nocatee?
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strider

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #12 on: November 30, 2008, 06:59:51 PM »
Do any of you know where those programs came from?  The auction in 1998, the SHARP program, the facade programs, and just about everything that is or has happened here basically came out of one study.  It is an interesting read and it also suggested HSCC or rather an organization that became HSCC even though SPAR was already here.  This was one study that the city actually followed more than it didn't.  There is still a lot that can and should be taken from it.  Utilities in the alleys, changing zoning and much more.  So, the name and date is?
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sheclown

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #13 on: November 30, 2008, 07:52:39 PM »
In 1985, the R/UDAT study (Regional/Urban Design Assistance Team) was funded by a grant from the Jacksonville Department of HUD and co-sponsored by The Jacksonville Chapter of American Institute of Architects.  It came out of that study that the area needed to become a Historic Preservation District.  The study laid out the areas strengths and weaknesses with suggestions on how to vitalize our area.  It is just fascinating to read.


sheclown

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Re: National Historic Register. Springfield, Jacksonville. So what?
« Reply #14 on: November 30, 2008, 08:05:50 PM »
The auction, which brought so much energy to the area in the late 90s was suggested in the "Springfield Action Plan of 1997".  It is in this Action Plan that the zoning overlay was recommended.  Interestingly enough the plan calls for the Main Street improvement as recommended by HSCC to "serve as a calming mechanism for area traffic, enhance pedestrian safety..."