Author Topic: Florida Crackers  (Read 1524 times)

JPalmer

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Re: Florida Crackers
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2017, 01:27:45 PM »
LOL this entire thread, I guess you either get it or you don't.

Tacachale

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Re: Florida Crackers
« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2017, 01:37:02 PM »
I'd like to know how some people came to use it as a deragatory term myself.

It's always been derogatory, and was reappropriated as a positive. It's really pretty similar to what has happened with the word "queer", and "redneck" to an extent. As a slur for white people, according to this it started by the 1940s:

Quote
Ste. Claire said that by the 1940s, the term began to take on yet another meaning in American inner cities in particular: as an epithet for bigoted white folks. But he wasn't sure how it happened. (I'm hazarding a guess here, but this would have been during the height of the Great Migration, as millions of black people from the South were moving to the North and West and fleeing Southern racism. They might have carried cracker with them as a shorthand for whites back in the Jim Crow South.)

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/07/01/197644761/word-watch-on-crackers

I expect this is right. In references I've seen from the black South in the '20s and '30s, "cracker" still meant a backwoods white. For example James Weldon Johnson lamented in his 1938 autobiography that Jacksonville had gone from being a comparatively pleasant place for African-Americans in his childhood, to a "one hundred percent cracker town" after the "rise to power of poor whites" took the reigns from the old "aristocratic families" who practiced noblesse oblige. When the Great Migration carried people out of the South, "cracker" may have evolved into a term for any nasty white person, and ultimately for any white person.
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?

remc86007

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Re: Florida Crackers
« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2017, 01:38:36 PM »
Another article about it: http://www.jaxdailyrecord.com/showstory.php?Story_id=549890

From the article : "A Florida cracker, he explained, is a Florida cowboy so named from the crack of the whip while hunting wild cattle in the swamps."

I'll definitely try it out when it opens.

FlaBoy

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Re: Florida Crackers
« Reply #18 on: May 19, 2017, 02:35:53 PM »
I'd like to know how some people came to use it as a deragatory term myself.

It's always been derogatory, and was reappropriated as a positive. It's really pretty similar to what has happened with the word "queer", and "redneck" to an extent. As a slur for white people, according to this it started by the 1940s:

Quote
Ste. Claire said that by the 1940s, the term began to take on yet another meaning in American inner cities in particular: as an epithet for bigoted white folks. But he wasn't sure how it happened. (I'm hazarding a guess here, but this would have been during the height of the Great Migration, as millions of black people from the South were moving to the North and West and fleeing Southern racism. They might have carried cracker with them as a shorthand for whites back in the Jim Crow South.)

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/07/01/197644761/word-watch-on-crackers

I expect this is right. In references I've seen from the black South in the '20s and '30s, "cracker" still meant a backwoods white. For example James Weldon Johnson lamented in his 1938 autobiography that Jacksonville had gone from being a comparatively pleasant place for African-Americans in his childhood, to a "one hundred percent cracker town" after the "rise to power of poor whites" took the reigns from the old "aristocratic families" who practiced noblesse oblige. When the Great Migration carried people out of the South, "cracker" may have evolved into a term for any nasty white person, and ultimately for any white person.

Makes sense. Remember too that Florida and Southern Georgia were kind of no man's land for a long long time. A lot of poor white folks looking for a better way of life moved to the region in search of some land and a fresh start.

RatTownRyan

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Re: Florida Crackers
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2017, 04:13:20 PM »
As I was walking into walmart today I over heard an argument between a black women and a white man. She referred to him as a "cracker ass". LOL. Looks like this restaurant is already getting free advertising.

Tacachale

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Re: Florida Crackers
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2017, 04:53:32 PM »
As an aside, I just learned that "Cracker Barrel" has a separate etymology from the epithet "cracker". It refers to barrels of soda crackers shipped to general stores, "around which informal discussions would take place between customers." The term "cracker-barrel" came to mean something simple, plain and unsophisticated, like the conversation in a country store. A cracker barrel appears in the restaurant's logo.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/cracker-barrel
http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/07/cracker-barrel-offensive/

To demonstrate how little offense people really take to being called "cracker", there's a long-running joke where people affect anger about the name to make light of PC culture. For example, the satirical Change.org petition to have the chain renamed to the less derogatory "Caucasian Barrel" or this brilliant photo asking "Whats Next? HONKEY BUCKET?"
Do you believe that when the blue jay or another bird sings and the body is trembling, that is a signal that people are coming or something important is about to happen?