Author Topic: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company  (Read 1189 times)

Keith-N-Jax

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2017, 01:34:55 AM »
That whole street looks dead, looks like a good spot for apartments maybe with ground level store/small cafe??

Gunnar

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2017, 08:19:28 AM »
The Petra flyer claims it does have on-site parking. Looking at Google Earth, there's a small gated surface lot behind the building.

The city owns that, per the coj link in the prior post.

Oh, did not notice that - thought the lot was part of the building - makes the asking price even less attractive.

Gunnar

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2017, 08:22:25 AM »
There is so much abandoned building stock downtown it scary. They should give it away or finance the purchase or it's going to sit forever.

Problem seems to be that speculators are holding on to properties waiting for "someone" to start a development boom that will increase their properties' value. At the same time, there is no upkeep on the properties so they continue to rot away, making the area even less attractive.

I am happy for every building that is not demolished -for whatever reason - but this is not really helping DT.

thelakelander

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2017, 08:56:35 AM »
Is there another city in FLORIDA with this many large abandoned buildings?

Tampa. They have large abandoned cigar factories all over their core. They have their share of downtown buildings as well. Unfortunately, the most impressive ones have been torn down and turned into parking lots. Orlando didn't have much to begin with, so you can't really compare it, in terms of historic building stock. Miami has been on another level over the last two decades, so it's hard to compare it apples to apples as well.










^I'm still pissed off about this one. This was the old flagship Maas Brother's department store. In 2006, it was torn down for a development project that failed to materialize. Today, it's a surface parking lot.
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thelakelander

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2017, 09:00:36 AM »
That whole street looks dead, looks like a good spot for apartments maybe with ground level store/small cafe??

This section of the Northbank is pretty bleak. Julia Street (a block west) may be the worst of all of them. However, I see buildings like this and others nearby (ex. Baptist Convention Building, Ambassador Hotel, etc.) as being prime candidates for FSCJ's push to add more student housing near their campus. This building is two or three blocks directly south and its pretty similar in design and size, as the Lerner Shops building they are renovating into dorms now.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

thelakelander

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2017, 09:05:28 AM »
There is so much abandoned building stock downtown it scary. They should give it away or finance the purchase or it's going to sit forever.

Problem seems to be that speculators are holding on to properties waiting for "someone" to start a development boom that will increase their properties' value. At the same time, there is no upkeep on the properties so they continue to rot away, making the area even less attractive.


I think the bigger Northbank problem is that we don't have a market that can support private sector restoration of large old buildings like this without some form of incentives or unconventional financing methods.  All of the housing projects underway in the Northbank are either labor of love driven (Elena Flats) or subsidized with tax credits/incentives (ex. Lofts of LaVilla, Houston Street Manor, FSCJ dorms). Hopefully, the market will incrementally improve as some of the current projects are completed.
"A man who views the world the same at 50 as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.” - Muhammad Ali

Gunnar

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2017, 01:44:36 PM »
There is so much abandoned building stock downtown it scary. They should give it away or finance the purchase or it's going to sit forever.

Problem seems to be that speculators are holding on to properties waiting for "someone" to start a development boom that will increase their properties' value. At the same time, there is no upkeep on the properties so they continue to rot away, making the area even less attractive.


I think the bigger Northbank problem is that we don't have a market that can support private sector restoration of large old buildings like this without some form of incentives or unconventional financing methods.  All of the housing projects underway in the Northbank are either labor of love driven (Elena Flats) or subsidized with tax credits/incentives (ex. Lofts of LaVilla, Houston Street Manor, FSCJ dorms). Hopefully, the market will incrementally improve as some of the current projects are completed.

I agree with you on this one but speculators asking unrealistic prices does not help. I understand that the current owners want to make as much as possible but if the asking price is too high to begin with, it does not make it easier.

In the end, this will IMHO just make restorable buildings rot away to the point where restoration increasingly less attractive.

stephendare

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2017, 01:46:27 PM »
meh. the idea that there isn't a market is nonsense.  The problem is truly the layers of government interference in the process.

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thelakelander

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2017, 02:09:29 PM »
There is so much abandoned building stock downtown it scary. They should give it away or finance the purchase or it's going to sit forever.

Problem seems to be that speculators are holding on to properties waiting for "someone" to start a development boom that will increase their properties' value. At the same time, there is no upkeep on the properties so they continue to rot away, making the area even less attractive.


I think the bigger Northbank problem is that we don't have a market that can support private sector restoration of large old buildings like this without some form of incentives or unconventional financing methods.  All of the housing projects underway in the Northbank are either labor of love driven (Elena Flats) or subsidized with tax credits/incentives (ex. Lofts of LaVilla, Houston Street Manor, FSCJ dorms). Hopefully, the market will incrementally improve as some of the current projects are completed.

I agree with you on this one but speculators asking unrealistic prices does not help. I understand that the current owners want to make as much as possible but if the asking price is too high to begin with, it does not make it easier.

In the end, this will IMHO just make restorable buildings rot away to the point where restoration increasingly less attractive.

The price could be impacting this property but it's hard to tell without more info. However, the fact that the privately funded market rate projects are happening outside of the Northbank (the Southbank has active projects) and don't involve expensive retrofits to large old buildings (even outside of DT, large adaptive reuse projects far and few inbetween) makes a strong statement about what the local market can support.
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MusicMan

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2017, 09:39:01 AM »
Lake, what type of redevelopment is going on in Tampa, compared to our urban core? The greater Tampa Bay area has almost 3 million people so that's a lot more than Duval County and surrounding area.

thelakelander

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2017, 10:19:39 AM »
^Greater Tampa Bay's most vibrant downtown isn't Tampa's though. It's St. Petersburg.  Also, although there's +3 million, there are multiple cities and downtowns. In Jax, not so much. Thus, in years past, DT Tampa and DT Jax were pretty close in scale and size. Since the 2000s, Tampa has seen significant development on the fringe of their downtown in places like the Channel District, Harbour Island and Ybor. Now DT Tampa appears to be finally coming into its own.  I'll be doing an article on DT Tampa's growth pretty soon. It's been on my things-to-do list for a while now.
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Gunnar

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2017, 09:38:34 AM »
That whole street looks dead, looks like a good spot for apartments maybe with ground level store/small cafe??

This section of the Northbank is pretty bleak. Julia Street (a block west) may be the worst of all of them. However, I see buildings like this and others nearby (ex. Baptist Convention Building, Ambassador Hotel, etc.) as being prime candidates for FSCJ's push to add more student housing near their campus. This building is two or three blocks directly south and its pretty similar in design and size, as the Lerner Shops building they are renovating into dorms now.

I really do like this building and - leaving financial aspects aside - I think it deserves to be renovated and would actually make for a great mixed use candidate (it does have two entrances, one for the store front and one on the side if I remember correctly).

It would really be a shame to let that one go but I think with its size it would take some equally large pockets.

remc86007

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2017, 12:12:07 PM »
meh. the idea that there isn't a market is nonsense.  The problem is truly the layers of government interference in the process.

I'm somewhat new around here, but I haven't heard that this is a large problem downtown before. Is there a previous article on this? If not, I think it would be very useful to discuss what exactly the inefficiencies are in redeveloping downtown.

stephendare

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Re: Abandoned Florida: The Jones Brothers Furniture Company
« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2017, 12:15:26 PM »
meh. the idea that there isn't a market is nonsense.  The problem is truly the layers of government interference in the process.

I'm somewhat new around here, but I haven't heard that this is a large problem downtown before. Is there a previous article on this? If not, I think it would be very useful to discuss what exactly the inefficiencies are in redeveloping downtown.

http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2016-jun-the-thirteen-moves-that-destroyed-downtown
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