Author Topic: Google Fiber  (Read 9831 times)

dukes_forge

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2015, 11:39:11 AM »
Marty, I was in the same situation with even worse service from ATT.  I'm now using a company called Orange Fiber, who do LOS to fiber, getting 50 up/down at extremely reasonable cost.  I met them when they were setting up free wi-fi for One Spark, and have been really happy with the service.  PM me and I'll give you contact info.

Westside Guy

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2016, 12:07:45 PM »
I had a friend ask me recently about the state of google fiber in Jacksonville. He said that he had heard that there were some ongoing talks between Google and the city. Anyone have any updates?

Snufflee

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2016, 12:23:53 PM »
https://www.reddit.com/r/jacksonville/comments/4dewtk/does_anyone_know_the_status_of_google_fiber/

http://floridapolitics.com/archives/197334-in-jax-google-fiber-implementation-devil-is-in-the-details

"Twenty-first century needs seem to be at direct war with 20th-century approaches to infrastructure. It is entirely possible that the existing vendors, whose operations are larded with legacy costs and union obligations, may make the cost of doing business for Google prohibitive."

Quoted from the article on Florida Politics.. If current political climate and incompetence are any indication then Google Fiber will come to Jax as other cities are moving on to the next generation of data transmission
And so it goes

CooperJax

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2016, 05:12:48 PM »
I'm moving to Jax sometime next year I would loooove to have Google Fiber I hope it comes to Jax soon!!

Gators312

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2016, 06:18:39 PM »
Visiting family in the KC area this week.  Ookla Speed tests are 431.50mbps on my iPhone and 996.80mbps on the wired PC connection.....Makes my comcast seem inadequate.   :o

« Last Edit: August 01, 2016, 06:45:35 PM by Gators312 »

spuwho

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2016, 12:18:46 AM »
https://www.reddit.com/r/jacksonville/comments/4dewtk/does_anyone_know_the_status_of_google_fiber/

http://floridapolitics.com/archives/197334-in-jax-google-fiber-implementation-devil-is-in-the-details

"Twenty-first century needs seem to be at direct war with 20th-century approaches to infrastructure. It is entirely possible that the existing vendors, whose operations are larded with legacy costs and union obligations, may make the cost of doing business for Google prohibitive."

Quoted from the article on Florida Politics.. If current political climate and incompetence are any indication then Google Fiber will come to Jax as other cities are moving on to the next generation of data transmission

After reading up on the AT&T issues/concerns, yeah it looks like an obstruction, but AT&T has more to lose than Google if some non-union techie gets up on a pole and mishandles their cable/fiber.  However, on the other side of the coin, AT&T would have to dispatch a tech to support the work and under the agreement, AT&T would get paid for the actions under a common pole agreement. Obviously Google thinks that's ridiculous. If Google wants to play the game, they should come prepared.

As far as anyone being concerned about data usage harvesting by their ISP, where have you been?  ALL ISP's harvest usage now. Either for internal QA or for behavioral/predictive advertising.

If you think Google is doing this out of the goodness of their corporate pocket, think again.  It's about the ads and data baby, nothing else.

The Jags and NFL harvest data like no ones business at every home game. It's the new norm.


mtraininjax

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2016, 04:00:32 PM »
We don't need no stinkin Google Fiber....

http://www.bizjournals.com/jacksonville/news/2016/08/23/exclusive-comcast-bringing-new-high-speed-wireless.html?ana=e_ae_set1&s=article_du&ed=2016-08-23&u=ws%2FwFtnjeqX1uMQ%2F9qEFWQ08d60585&t=1471982211&j=75535212

Quote
Exclusive: Comcast bringing new high-speed wireless internet to Jacksonville

A new high-speed internet is coming to Jacksonville.

Comcast is bringing its DOCSIS 3.1 technology to the First Coast, which will allow for internet service of 1 Gigabit per second wirelessly to businesses and homes.

Although a price has not yet been decided for the Jacksonville area, the service is being offered in Chicago for about $140 per month.

“At the end of the day, this is exciting for people who want to get gig speed over a cable connection without fiber,” Arco said. “This is for when the economics and installation and timelines are not feasible, it’s a more seamless transition for people who want high-speed internet and want to go this way.”
And, that $115 will save Jacksonville from financial ruin. - Mayor John Peyton

“This is a game-changer. This is what I mean when I say taking Jacksonville to the next level.”
-Mayor Alvin Brown on new video boards at Everbank Field

spuwho

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2016, 06:12:41 PM »
We don't need no stinkin Google Fiber....

http://www.bizjournals.com/jacksonville/news/2016/08/23/exclusive-comcast-bringing-new-high-speed-wireless.html?ana=e_ae_set1&s=article_du&ed=2016-08-23&u=ws%2FwFtnjeqX1uMQ%2F9qEFWQ08d60585&t=1471982211&j=75535212

Quote
Exclusive: Comcast bringing new high-speed wireless internet to Jacksonville

A new high-speed internet is coming to Jacksonville.

Comcast is bringing its DOCSIS 3.1 technology to the First Coast, which will allow for internet service of 1 Gigabit per second wirelessly to businesses and homes.

Although a price has not yet been decided for the Jacksonville area, the service is being offered in Chicago for about $140 per month.

“At the end of the day, this is exciting for people who want to get gig speed over a cable connection without fiber,” Arco said. “This is for when the economics and installation and timelines are not feasible, it’s a more seamless transition for people who want high-speed internet and want to go this way.”

This article has errors.

DOCSIS 3.1 is a cable industry method for modulating and bonding channel frequencies for data use. It is not a wireless technology. 

The only way Comcast can provide 1Gbps wirelessly is if they bundle the cable modem with a 802.11ac wireless router. However, let it be known that you cant reach that speed in real life, it is merely a signaling rate.

Even if you have the right client adapter or if you have alot of noisy wifi neighbors, you will never reach the speeds  advertised by a wireless method.

JaxAvondale

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #23 on: October 25, 2016, 09:30:59 PM »

remc86007

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #24 on: October 25, 2016, 10:57:14 PM »
Anybody else think we need municipal owned fiber? Imagine the draw for businesses if JEA provided a $500 a month plan for 10,000 down and 1000 up? Or consumers getting 1000 up and down for $100 a month.

spuwho

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #25 on: October 25, 2016, 11:23:32 PM »
Our hopes and dreams for high speed internet and digital competition have been quelled.

https://gizmodo.com/google-fiber-halts-operations-in-ten-cities-1788214992?rev=1477443092657&utm_campaign=socialflow_gizmodo_twitter&utm_source=gizmodo_twitter&utm_medium=socialflow

This means that ATT and Verizons attempts to obstruct or slowdown Google's investment were successful.

Google is now going to attempt to use unlicensed "white space" wireless as part of their strategy. They already tried to license diiferent blocks of spectrum in the last 2 FCC auctions, but the best they could do was bid up ATT, to make them pay more.

White space is unused spectrum that is allocated between auctioned blocks to keep them from interfering with each other. Google has technology that allows this space to be modulated to deliver data over long distances.

The issue is that this spectrum falls on top of the guard bands in the former TV broadcast channels, channels now being used by ATT for their national LTE Advanced rollout.

ATT says they dont want any interlopers in their spectrum. Google says its non harming, just like Verixon does for LTE-U.

ATT and Verizon are known as spectrum hogs, where they outbid people for the spectrum, but then "sit on it" because it is cheaper for them to own it and keep it out of competitors hands, than to spend more money updating their eqipment to use it.

In effect this creates an artificial scarcity of spectrum which they use to place usage caps on data, because "there isnt enough" which of course is total BS.

Verizon now wants to impinge on the unlicensed spectrum allocated to WiFi with a product called LTE-U. While they say it will be non interfering, many people see this as a way to subvert consumer spectrum and make it less appealing than your data plan from a carrier.

As you can see, there is a lot of cloak and dagger in the world of broadband access.

The hypocracy continues today as ATT wants to own Time Warner.now tell me, if bandwidth for mobile data is so scarce as they say, why would yhey be bidding on a content v ompany because they say "wireless video is the future".

Again BS. Its like ATT trying to buy TMobile and telling everyone prices will go down except the shareholders, whom they tell they can raise prices. I see the same issue with TW.

BridgeTroll

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2016, 08:06:56 AM »
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/google-fiber-hits-the-pause-button-what-went-wrong

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What Went Wrong With Google Fiber?
 
Written by
SAM GUSTIN
October 26, 2016 // 04:40 PM EST

Google Fiber, we hardly knew ya’.

Google parent Alphabet’s decision to put the brakes on its superfast fiber-based internet service represents a disappointing setback for one of the Silicon Valley titan’s most ambitious “moonshots.”

In a corporate blog post earlier this week, Craig Barratt, CEO of Google Access, the Alphabet division that operates Google Fiber, announced that he is stepping down from his role as the company makes “changes to focus our business and product strategy.”

Barratt said that while the tech giant will continue to operate Google Fiber in the cities where it has promised to do so, work is being “paused” in the cities where it hasn’t committed to operating the service. And about nine percent of Google Access’s 1500 employees, or approximately 130 workers, are being let go, according to published reports.

Barratt stressed that Alphabet remains committed to its vision of connecting more people to “superfast and abundant internet.” But for now, the company is clearly scaling back its once lofty ambitions to introduce wired gigabit internet service from coast to coast in an effort to offer consumers an alternative to mostly slower, mostly costlier services delivered by the likes of Comcast, Charter and AT&T.

For consumers hoping to break free from the tyranny of these cable and telecom incumbents, which wield monopoly or duopoly power in many parts of the country, this development is sure to be a major bummer. For executives at the nation’s dominant cable and phone companies, however, the news is sure to be greeted with cackles of delight and no small amount of schadenfreude.

What does Google Fiber’s “pause” mean for you?

If you live in the following cities, rest easy, because Google Fiber will continue to be available: Atlanta, GA; Austin, TX; Charlotte, NC; Kansas City in MO and KS; Nashville, TN; Provo, UT; Salt Lake City, UT; and North Carolina’s Triangle region.

But for folks in some of the nation’s largest urban areas, you’re out of luck, at least for now. These include Los Angeles, CA; Chicago, IL; Phoenix, AZ; Portland, OR; San Diego, CA; San Jose, CA; Dallas, TX; Jacksonville, FL; Oklahoma City, OK; and Tampa, FL.

“We’re ever grateful to these cities for their ongoing partnership and patience, and we’re confident we’ll have an opportunity to resume our partnership discussions once we’ve advanced our technologies and solutions,” Barratt wrote. One of those technologies is wireless internet service, which is why Alphabet recently bought Webpass, a company that delivers “last-mile” high-speed wireless signals to buildings in several cities.

So what happened to Google Fiber?

For one thing, building out a brand new wireline communications network from scratch is costly, difficult work. Permits must be obtained, partnerships with local governments must be struck, and obstacles thrown up by incumbent ISPs and their allies in statehouses must be overcome. Then there’s the small matter of actually building out the network—laying fiber in the ground, or stringing fiber on utility poles—which is an expensive, labor-intensive, and time-consuming endeavor.

"I suspect the sheer economics of broad scale access deployments finally became too much for them," Jan Dawson, an analyst with Jackdaw Research, told Bloomberg. "Ultimately, most of the reasons Google got into this in the first place have either been achieved or been demonstrated to be unrealistic."

Then there’s the changing nature of Alphabet itself. As the Silicon Valley search giant (and its top executives) have matured, and as the company’s once-torrid growth-rate has slowed, its ambitions have returned to Earth, in some cases literally. Gone are the heady days when Google’s co-founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, entertained outlandish dreams of building space elevators, for example. (As far back as 2014, that project was put in a “deep freeze.”)

Gone are the heady days when Google’s co-founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, entertained outlandish dreams of building space elevators.
Meanwhile, Alphabet is under increasing pressure from Wall Street to rein in the costs associated with its more fantastical moonshots. Alphabet’s moonshot bets, which include its secretive X R&D lab, lost a whopping $859 million in the second quarter of 2016. Google Glass, the company’s high-tech eyewear project, failed to live up to expectations and has gone into hibernation. And earlier this year, Alphabet reportedly put its Boston Dynamics robotics division up for sale.

In 2015, Alphabet poached former Morgan Stanley executive Ruth Porat to be its new chief financial officer, and while Porat has publicly insisted that the company remains committed to Google Fiber, there can be little doubt that project’s “pause” is, at least in part, a consequence of her mandate to bring more financial discipline to the company.

One thing seems clear: Alphabet's decision to halt its fiber expansion increases the urgency for cities and municipalities around the country to build community broadband networks if they want faster, cheaper alternatives to the dominant internet service providers. It appears increasingly likely that Google Fiber won’t save you, people, so maybe it’s time to take matters into your own hands.

Correction: This story was updated after publication to clarify that all of Alphabet's moonshots lost $859 million, rather than the X lab on its own.
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Snaketoz

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2016, 09:44:03 AM »
Very sad news, indeed.  I'm desperate to kick Comcast/Infinity to the curb.

Bill Hoff

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Re: Google Fiber
« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2017, 07:36:37 AM »
Good piece on the impact of Google Fiber on Kansas City;

http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2017/11/08/google-fiber-kansas-city?