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Author Topic: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future  (Read 10318 times)

Metro Jacksonville

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Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« on: April 30, 2013, 03:01:54 AM »
Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future



Joshua Taylor of Metrojacksonville discusses the importance of transportation planning in the redevelopment of Riverside Avenue in J'villes Brooklyn District. Filmed in Partnership with News4Jax.  Join us after the jump for what is sure to be a hotly debated topic.

Full Article
http://www.metrojacksonville.com/article/2013-apr-jvilles-brooklyn-renaissance-planning-for-the-future

sheclown

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2013, 06:23:58 AM »
Great Job Josh. 


Noone

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2013, 07:46:06 AM »
Very nice Josh. I love how the river is center to most of these projects. Cummer, YMCA, heck the picture of the Main St. bridge. How would you like to kayak Downtown and we can put in at Sydney Geffen Park that still needs a Mayor Brown kayak logo and in a future report of yours you can make the statement. " Joshua Taylor for Metrojacksonville.com reporting from the river and why we are Downtown and your not."

aaapolito

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2013, 08:43:41 AM »
Excellent thoughts.  We can only hope that this type of exposure will catch the attention of those in charge of creating a plan for transit in Brooklyn.
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tufsu1

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2013, 09:10:41 AM »
I don't think the new developments in Brooklyn will in any way lead to gridlock....keep in mind that Riverside Avenue was recently widened to 6 lanes and a new I-95 interchange built at Forrest Street.

stephendare

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2013, 10:06:03 AM »
I don't think the new developments in Brooklyn will in any way lead to gridlock....keep in mind that Riverside Avenue was recently widened to 6 lanes and a new I-95 interchange built at Forrest Street.

Then you must not have lived here for very long.  With much fewer residents and cars, the entire area ended up being a total blockade for hours every day. 

Very worst memories of driving for me:  Being caught on the somewhat steeper incline right by the newspaper building with a standard shift transmission, waiting for 30 minutes before traffic started moving.  When I was 22 I simply could not quite figure out how to do this without sliding backwards into the cars behind me. ;)
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tufsu1

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2013, 10:44:02 AM »
and wasn't Riverside Avenue 2 lanes at the time?  A 6-lane road has much more capacity

cline

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2013, 10:50:28 AM »
The newly widened roadway is much, much different than it was back in the day.  It functions much better now than it used to.

stephendare

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2013, 10:57:25 AM »
There were more crosss streets that led you through, and Park Street was a major connection point to riverside.  All that drew off traffic.  But the biggest difference, I think with the new development will be the cnanging nature and hours of density for the tight little area. 

Keep in mind that the old roadway didnt have to deal with the millions of tiny little pauses as people are figuring out how to turn into shopping and homes along the course of riverside avenue, because the entire strip was composed of professional offices and light industrial businesses that were actively going home themselves and leaving the area---creating basically one direction of congestion.

With the new usages there will be people simultaneously coming home to the area and slowing it down.

I personally think this is a miraculous change for the area, but I do think that it is seriously time that Riverside Avondale lead the rest of the city in implementing a legitimate mass transit system.
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fsujax

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2013, 10:59:55 AM »
I agree those neighbors should be speaking up about these issues and seriously consider mass transit improvements vs. adding more parking or additional capacity on roads.

cline

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2013, 11:02:27 AM »
I personally think this is a miraculous change for the area, but I do think that it is seriously time that Riverside Avondale lead the rest of the city in implementing a legitimate mass transit system.

You'll get no argument from me on that.  I think that extending the Skyway to the new developments in Brooklyn is a no-brainer.  I was just pointing at that traffic on the road is better than it was back in the day.  That being said, these new developments will obviously add more traffic to the area.  Providing a transit option that would directly service these new residents would help to keep some of these vehicles off the road.

stephendare

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2013, 11:05:04 AM »
I agree those neighbors should be speaking up about these issues and seriously consider mass transit improvements vs. adding more parking or additional capacity on roads.

The last time they tried to solve the problem with more parking it ended up in grevious demolitions and proposed road widenings that would have destroyed even more of the neighborhood.

Now is the time, when there are private developers making decisions to ask for the improvements.
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Tacachale

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2013, 11:18:04 AM »
The current setup of Riverside Ave should serve sufficiently for a long time. Public transit was always supposed to be part of the picture. As Brooklyn starts to come back it's high time that piece is finally included.
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thelakelander

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2013, 11:18:24 AM »
No, these developments won't lead to vehicular gridlock in area.  The main thing about the Skyway and mass transit that is being overlooked in the Brooklyn discussion the economic development component and its relationship with the overall strategy to bring vibrancy back to downtown.  We're never going to have a truly vibrant pedestrian scale downtown district if we continue to ignore the impact of mass transit connectivity between urban neighborhoods. 

For example, when these Brooklyn developments are completed, they will become isolated zones of pedestrian scale activity.  They have their own residential base, commercial components, parks and thousands of office workers literally across the street.  However, that neighborhood alone, won't be large enough to keep its commercial uses (ex. restaurants, grocery store, pharmacy, etc.) open.  Their actual market will also rely on the residential and workforce population from surrounding areas like the North and Southbank.  Skyway connectivity, actually allows people to live in various subdistricts of downtown and have direct access to Brooklyn's commercial infill without the need to get in a car and drive the extra mile. 

For Brooklyn, Skyway connectivity allows its residents to have direct access to cultural attractions, nightlife, employment centers, businesses, etc. in the Northbank and Southbank, without the need of driving.  Ignoring mass transit connectivity with Brooklyn's developments pretty much means we're content on having new infill in Brooklyn compete with the rest of downtown as it's own isolated spot of urban activity.  It also means, we're perfectly content with them not helping one another work together to advance the concept of urban livability in the core.

This doesn't make a lot of sense and is quite the opposite of the goal to revitalize downtown.  Heck, having to drive to the grocery, despite staying in some location like the Carling or Strand is the exact opposite of why people are generally attracted to urban living in the first place.

stephendare

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Re: Jville's Brooklyn Renaissance: Planning for the Future
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2013, 11:27:07 AM »
No, these developments won't lead to vehicular gridlock in area.  The main thing about the Skyway and mass transit that is being overlooked in the Brooklyn discussion the economic development component and its relationship with the overall strategy to bring vibrancy back to downtown.  We're never going to have a truly vibrant pedestrian scale downtown district if we continue to ignore the impact of mass transit connectivity between urban neighborhoods. 

For example, when these Brooklyn developments are completed, they will become isolated zones of pedestrian scale activity.  They have their own residential base, commercial components, parks and thousands of office workers literally across the street.  However, that neighborhood alone, won't be large enough to keep its commercial uses (ex. restaurants, grocery store, pharmacy, etc.) open.  Their actual market will also rely on the residential and workforce population from surrounding areas like the North and Southbank.  Skyway connectivity, actually allows people to live in various subdistricts of downtown and have direct access to Brooklyn's commercial infill without the need to get in a car and drive the extra mile. 

For Brooklyn, Skyway connectivity allows its residents to have direct access to cultural attractions, nightlife, employment centers, businesses, etc. in the Northbank and Southbank, without the need of driving.  Ignoring mass transit connectivity with Brooklyn's developments pretty much means we're content on having new infill in Brooklyn compete with the rest of downtown as it's own isolated spot of urban activity.  It also means, we're perfectly content with them not helping one another work together to advance the concept of urban livability in the core.

This doesn't make a lot of sense and is quite the opposite of the goal to revitalize downtown.  Heck, having to drive to the grocery, despite staying in some location like the Carling or Strand is the exact opposite of why people are generally attracted to urban living in the first place.

I agree with you on every point except for your first, and there I think, history and I both disagree with it ;).

Those "sharrows" are going to look mighty dispensable as that area gets up and running.  Especially around the bend on Riverside.

But aside from the obvious traffic dispersal, benefits, connectivity is in itself a thing to be pursued!

Riverside and Avondale would be so very well served by establishing and pursuing a walkable, connective neighborhood policy built around the transit basis upon which it was originally designed.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2013, 11:31:00 AM by stephendare »
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