Author Topic: What lost mobility fee funds could have paid for  (Read 7025 times)

JeffreyS

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Re: What lost mobility fee funds could have paid for
« Reply #45 on: February 25, 2013, 09:49:54 PM »
I just sent another round of emails.
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pwhitford

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Re: What lost mobility fee funds could have paid for
« Reply #46 on: February 26, 2013, 03:04:19 PM »
to:    Clay@coj.net, WBishop@coj.net, RClark@coj.net, Redman@coj.net, LBoyer@coj.net, MattS@coj.net, Gaffney@coj.net, EDLee@coj.net, WAJones@coj.net, RBrown@coj.net, Holt@coj.net, doylec@coj.net, Gulliford@coj.net, JimLove@coj.net, KimDaniels@coj.net, JRC@coj.net, Joost@coj.net, GAnderson@coj.net, RLumb@coj.net, mayorbrown@coj.net
date:    Tue, Feb 26, 2013 at 3:00 PM
subject:    Vote NO on 2013-94

I am a resident of District 5.  I just wanted to advise you of my opinion on the proposed Mobility Fee Moratorium. 

I am clearly, strongly and unequivocally opposed to any mobility fee moratorium.  There is no actual evidence in support of any argument that the moratorium has any effect on development here in Jacksonville  let alone a negative one   Meanwhile, the loss of revenue to the City of Jacksonville is inexcusable, especially in light of a) the difficult financial times we find ourselves in, and b) the actual effect of the moratorium   Specifically I refer to the fact that the moratorium benefits only a small class of (Well connected?  Wealthy enough to pay the most effective lobbyists?) citizens, and is only objected to by them because it serves to lessen, to a rather small degree, their ultimate financial return on an investment.  This is  a reckless practice that entices irrational development, without context or sustainability, the negative impacts of which resonate long after any alleged "benefit" from the "spurred" construction has evaporated.  In reality, the moratorium disproportionately and negatively effects the vast majority of "regular" citizens of Jacksonville who end up either paying more in taxes for the developer's folly or must suffer from lower standards of service and less desirable conditions because of the effects of such development and the diversion of their taxes to supplement a developer's irrational dreams of mindless expansion and sprawl.

We must not sacrifice our citizens genuine interests for invisible or non-existent short term "gains" nor for political expedience.  I know you are probably bombarded with various forms of influence wielded by the experienced and cagey agents and supporters of the objecting class, a small but powerful group of local developers. But I urge you to stand strong in opposition to these forces of stagnation and greed.  Vote against the mobility fee moratorium and vote for a better Jacksonville. 

Thank you
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fsujax

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Re: What lost mobility fee funds could have paid for
« Reply #47 on: February 26, 2013, 03:51:38 PM »
Here is the text of my email.

Dear Council members,
 
I am asking that you do not vote to extend the moratorium on collecting the mobility fee. We can longer continue to subsidize suburban sprawl. We need to begin to encourage investment and redevelopment in the urban core and surronding neighborhoods by improving connectivity and mobility. We also can not afford to lose the ability to leverage FEDERAL FUNDING. The competition for project funding on the national level is becoming more and more stiff, the feds are looking to invest in communities that invest in themselves. This mobility fee is a sure way for Jacksonville to be able to match federal dollars with local dollars to help fund major transit or highway projects. If we do not have a sure proof way of setting aside local dollars to match federal dollars Jacksonville will lose out to other cities like Charlotte, Austin, Nashville etc. For the sake and future of the quality of life in this city please do not extend the moratorium.
 
Thank you for your time and consideration in this very important matter.

Cliona

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Re: What lost mobility fee funds could have paid for
« Reply #48 on: February 26, 2013, 04:13:29 PM »
to:    Clay@coj.net, WBishop@coj.net, RClark@coj.net, Redman@coj.net, LBoyer@coj.net, MattS@coj.net, Gaffney@coj.net, EDLee@coj.net, WAJones@coj.net, RBrown@coj.net, Holt@coj.net, doylec@coj.net, Gulliford@coj.net, JimLove@coj.net, KimDaniels@coj.net, JRC@coj.net, Joost@coj.net, GAnderson@coj.net, RLumb@coj.net, mayorbrown@coj.net
date:    Tue, Feb 26, 2013 at 3:00 PM
subject:    Vote NO on 2013-94

I am a resident of District 5.  I just wanted to advise you of my opinion on the proposed Mobility Fee Moratorium. 

I am clearly, strongly and unequivocally opposed to any mobility fee moratorium.  There is no actual evidence in support of any argument that the moratorium has any effect on development here in Jacksonville  let alone a negative one   Meanwhile, the loss of revenue to the City of Jacksonville is inexcusable, especially in light of a) the difficult financial times we find ourselves in, and b) the actual effect of the moratorium   Specifically I refer to the fact that the moratorium benefits only a small class of (Well connected?  Wealthy enough to pay the most effective lobbyists?) citizens, and is only objected to by them because it serves to lessen, to a rather small degree, their ultimate financial return on an investment.  This is  a reckless practice that entices irrational development, without context or sustainability, the negative impacts of which resonate long after any alleged "benefit" from the "spurred" construction has evaporated.  In reality, the moratorium disproportionately and negatively effects the vast majority of "regular" citizens of Jacksonville who end up either paying more in taxes for the developer's folly or must suffer from lower standards of service and less desirable conditions because of the effects of such development and the diversion of their taxes to supplement a developer's irrational dreams of mindless expansion and sprawl.

We must not sacrifice our citizens genuine interests for invisible or non-existent short term "gains" nor for political expedience.  I know you are probably bombarded with various forms of influence wielded by the experienced and cagey agents and supporters of the objecting class, a small but powerful group of local developers. But I urge you to stand strong in opposition to these forces of stagnation and greed.  Vote against the mobility fee moratorium and vote for a better Jacksonville. 

Thank you

Springfield Chicken

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Re: What lost mobility fee funds could have paid for
« Reply #49 on: February 26, 2013, 04:47:55 PM »
to the Mayor and City Council:

http://www.colliergov.net/index.aspx?page=1725

I’ve been in real estate for over 20 years.  In Collier County, where I worked up until 2006, we had the largest impact fees in the state.  Not only did the existence of those fees not deter growth, Collier County was one of the fastest growing counties in the state for decades.  So any argument that Mobility Fees will hamper growth is a myth or a story put out by developers who want to enhance their profits.  Developers don’t work on small profit margins.  So the fractional impact a Mobility Fee will have on their profits is minor and will not be the reason they choose to build or not.

In the meantime, Jacksonville has to work on its image and infrastructure if we are going to be a viable location for new business, expanded business, and desirability.  The fees are structured such that growth pays for growth.  There are incentives to build where infrastructure already exists.  The Jacksonville area sprawls over a large area but we have a lot of pockets of available land in areas that could be developed at a lower cost to the developer.

Take a look at the link above.  You can calculate in Collier County the amount of the impact fee for any kind of development down to a single family home, which by the way is currently around $18,000.  Their growth has not stopped but the quality of life they can offer with the infrastructure paid for with developer fees has made it one of the top places to live in the state of Florida.

Jacksonville has so much to offer that South Florida does not – the ocean, rivers, historic areas, etc.  Let’s make sure that our infrastructure adds to that desirability!


tufsu1

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Re: What lost mobility fee funds could have paid for
« Reply #50 on: February 26, 2013, 05:08:46 PM »
sent my letters today