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Author Topic: Gun Nut Sets "Trap" for First Responders After Committing Arson. Kills Several  (Read 5850 times)

stephendare

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Apparently, Tomasz was put into the ground today at a funeral service in the small town he lived in.

Here is is Obituary:



Kaczowka, Tomasz

Marian

Webster: Tomasz Marian Kaczowka, at the age of 19, passed away in the line of duty with his mentor and close friend, Lt. Michael "Chip" Chiapperini on December 24, 2012.

Tomasz was born May 16, 1993 in Rochester, NY to Janina and Marian Kaczowka. He attended Webster Thomas High School, graduating in 2011.

After high school, Tomasz committed his life to Civil Service through several avenues. Whether it was through working the overnight shift as an emergency dispatch operator for the City of Rochester, or waking up all hours of the night to attend various emergencies, this selfless young man devoted every spare ounce of his effort and courage to help those who needed it, right to the end. Everyone's "little brother" died doing what he loved.

He is survived by his mother and father, Janina and Marian; along with his older twin brothers, Dariusz and Greg; grandparents, Mieczyslaw and Stanislawa Lysik; aunts, Alicia (Wladek) Wojtowicz and Teresa Lysik; uncle, Stefan (Jolanta) Lysik; and loving aunts, uncles, cousins and friends in Rochester and Poland, and the extended family at West Webster Fire Department.

The public may call 6-9 PM Friday, 12-3 & 6-9 PM Saturday at Webster Schroeder High School, 875 Ridge Road, Webster. Tomasz's Funeral Mass will be held on Monday at St. Stanislaus Church (Hudson Ave. at Norton St., Rochester) at 10 AM. Interment Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. Memorials may be directed to West Webster Fire Dept. or St. Stanislaus Church in Tomasz's memory.
And now abide faith, hope and love; these three, but the greatest of these is love

stephendare

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Apparently the very young man was killed with two bullets while he was still on the Fire Engine.  Still in his teens and shot down like a dog on Christmas Eve trying to put out a fire.

Chiapperini and Scardino were in the same car, Chiapperini was killed by one bullet, and Scardino got two bullets, one in the knee and one in the shoulder.

Hofstetter got shot in the Pelvis while on the fire engine.

Like Kaczowka, he was one of the younger boys sleeping at the fire station over the Christmas vacation so that the older family men could be home with their kids.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2012, 11:13:41 AM by stephendare »
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BridgeTroll

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FBI homicide records for 2011... by weapon.  Oddly... death by rifle or assault rifle is rare compared to death by knife... or hand, or other method.  Handguns appear to be the preferred method.

http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/table-20

Using California as an example... there were 45 murders via rifle in 2011.

There were 261 via knife, 208 using "other methods"(rock, rope, candlestick, etc), and 101 via hands/feet
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

stephendare

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FBI homicide records for 2011... by weapon.  Oddly... death by rifle or assault rifle is rare compared to death by knife... or hand, or other method.  Handguns appear to be the preferred method.

http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/table-20

Using California as an example... there were 45 murders via rifle in 2011.

There were 261 via knife, 208 using "other methods"(rock, rope, candlestick, etc), and 101 via hands/feet

Hmm.  Kind of makes them sound completely uneccesary, doesnt it, BT?

« Last Edit: January 04, 2013, 09:07:39 AM by stephendare »
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BridgeTroll

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FBI homicide records for 2011... by weapon.  Oddly... death by rifle or assault rifle is rare compared to death by knife... or hand, or other method.  Handguns appear to be the preferred method.

http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/table-20

Using California as an example... there were 45 murders via rifle in 2011.

There were 261 via knife, 208 using "other methods"(rock, rope, candlestick, etc), and 101 via hands/feet

Hmm.  Kind of makes them sound completely uneccesary, doesnt it, BT?



Or the attention they are getting...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

stephendare

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FBI homicide records for 2011... by weapon.  Oddly... death by rifle or assault rifle is rare compared to death by knife... or hand, or other method.  Handguns appear to be the preferred method.

http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/table-20

Using California as an example... there were 45 murders via rifle in 2011.

There were 261 via knife, 208 using "other methods"(rock, rope, candlestick, etc), and 101 via hands/feet

Hmm.  Kind of makes them sound completely uneccesary, doesnt it, BT?



Or the attention they are getting...
bunch of school kids are kindof hard to miss.
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NotNow

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Blaming Sandy Hook on "assault rifles" now seems to be unfounded:

http://video.today.msnbc.msn.com/today/50208495#50208495


The same government stats that BT posted indicates that more people were murdered using hammers than were by all classes of rifles in 2011.
"We may yet become the first nation to die from a terminal case of frivolity. Other great nations in history have been threatened by barbarians at the gates. We may be the first to be threatened by self-indulgent silliness inside the gates." - Thomas Sowell

Adam W

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Blaming Sandy Hook on "assault rifles" now seems to be unfounded:

http://video.today.msnbc.msn.com/today/50208495#50208495


The same government stats that BT posted indicates that more people were murdered using hammers than were by all classes of rifles in 2011.

As an aside, that's assuming that no more than 173 rifles are included in the 1,587 "firearms, type not stated" statistic.

Just to be fair.

http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/crime-in-the-u.s/2011/crime-in-the-u.s.-2011/tables/expanded-homicide-data-table-8

NotNow

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Fair enough.  Of course, you should also consider the 853 "other weapons or weapons not stated" and the fact that any number of hammers might be included in that number as well. 

Of course, the point remains that "rifles" are a small percentage in the "weapons used in murder" stat.  The statistic surely doesn't match the inaccurate rhetoric on the dangers of what the misinformed are calling "assault rifles".   

"We may yet become the first nation to die from a terminal case of frivolity. Other great nations in history have been threatened by barbarians at the gates. We may be the first to be threatened by self-indulgent silliness inside the gates." - Thomas Sowell

Adam W

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Fair enough.  Of course, you should also consider the 853 "other weapons or weapons not stated" and the fact that any number of hammers might be included in that number as well. 

Of course, the point remains that "rifles" are a small percentage in the "weapons used in murder" stat.  The statistic surely doesn't match the inaccurate rhetoric on the dangers of what the misinformed are calling "assault rifles".

Of course. I don't really care - as it wasn't my issue in the first place. I am much more troubled by the fact that firearms are by far the leading cause of homicides in the USA. Type of firearm is of no real issue to me. I think assault weapons are a distraction, personally - mass shootings account for a small number of total annual gun deaths in the USA, even if they are more revolting or whatever.

stephendare

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Fair enough.  Of course, you should also consider the 853 "other weapons or weapons not stated" and the fact that any number of hammers might be included in that number as well. 

Of course, the point remains that "rifles" are a small percentage in the "weapons used in murder" stat.  The statistic surely doesn't match the inaccurate rhetoric on the dangers of what the misinformed are calling "assault rifles".

Of course. I don't really care - as it wasn't my issue in the first place. I am much more troubled by the fact that firearms are by far the leading cause of homicides in the USA. Type of firearm is of no real issue to me. I think assault weapons are a distraction, personally - mass shootings account for a small number of total annual gun deaths in the USA, even if they are more revolting or whatever.

this.
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Ocklawaha

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Stomping around on Goat Mountain near 29 Palms, CA. I always carry my .44 mag saddle rifle.  The state's of California and Nevada have both posted signs warning of a large number of LARGE cat attacks in the region. I also had the distinct displeasure of realizing I was being followed by a pack of coyote's... Yeah, I didn't know they hunted as a pack, but I guess they do or can. It's times like these that I wish the .44 could pump out 6-8 bullets on full automatic. Missing one of these animals on your first shot could also make it your last shot.  There is a certain comfort factor knowing that I have the stopping power for large animals on the attack.

I am NOT and never have been a hunter, and don't like to kill anything, but having the weapons in such a remote place is actually a good idea.

urbanlibertarian

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Looks like BT wasted his money on a gun when he could have just bought a 3D printer and made his own:

http://reason.com/blog/2013/01/07/prohibitions-dont-work

Prohibitions Don't Work, And New Technology Makes That More Obvious
J.D. Tuccille|January 7, 2013 8:48 pm

As I've mentioned before, the Ottoman Empire once punished tobacco use by death. That worked out so well, the law was rescinded a generation later amidst a cloud of fragrant smoke. Americans being slower learners, the war on drugs is a decades-old cliche in the United States, yet 42 percent of us have smoked grass and 16 percent of us have tried cocaine — the highest percentages recorded internationally by the World Health Organization. Likewise, gun controls have, as I've documented, met massive resistance for simple registration and laughable levels of compliance for confiscation schemes. Prohibitions have a wonderfully long track record of abject failure when it comes to eliminating, or even reducing the availability of, the things and behaviors at which they are targeted. And that's before we even get to the individually empowering world of new technology.

The popular prohibition movement of the moment has firearms in its ... err ... sights. Led by (really?) Vice President Joe Biden, a White House task force is apparently considering new gun laws that would restrict those scary-looking rifles known as "assault weapons," ban high-capacity magazines, track sales (maybe through registration?) and require whatever else the politicians in the group think will win them votes.

Meanwhile, a merry band of gun-rights activists known as Defense Distributed have been using 3D printing technology to develop the means of producing guns and related paraphernalia at home. Brian Doherty has already written about this development at length, and I've covered it myself. But as it happens, matters have moved forward, and Defense Distributed is now producing high-capacity magazines with 3D printers. The group's CEO, Cody Wilson, told Metro World News, "I have five people now making AK-47 magazines – they’re incredibly easy to reproduce."

That's in addition to the group's recent successes with producing actual gun receivers that work — even if the very first one broke after only six shots. Such success with a new technology is a clear sign of more to come as the technology, and expertise in using it, progresses. As Metro World News continued:

So how could the weapons be controlled? A spokesman for 3D print company Automaker said it is powerless; “we do not promote guns, but we cannot control the use of the product.” Neither can government intervene effectively, says Michael Weinberg, attorney specializing in emerging technologies for the U.S. Public Knowledge think tank. “When you apply anger over gun control to a general purpose technology there’s a lot of collateral damage”, he said. “It’s like if you regulate steel – a lot of productive areas would be lost. We don’t know enough about 3D printing to legislate the future.”

Basically, the cat is out of the bag. 3D printing means that prohibitions on mechanical devices — never successful in the past — are now more easily bypassed than ever.

Drugs, too, if a related technology known as chemical printing is any indicator. That technology is earlier in its development, but it holds promise for solving the orphan drug problem, and for making end-runs around drug prohibition. From the Huffington Post:

Recently, Professor Lee Cronin from the University of Glasgow has taken the idea of 3D printing a step further. He's using a $2,000 3D printer to print lab equipment--blocks containing chambers that connect to mixing chambers--and then injecting the desired ingredients into the chambers to produce organic and/or inorganic reactions that can yield chemicals, and in some cases new compounds.

Just as early 3D printers were used for rapid prototyping, his new chemical printer can initially be used to rapidly discover new compounds.  And if you look at the development of 3D printers, it is not hard to see that in the near future you could print highly specialized chemicals and even pharmaceuticals. The team is currently working on printing ibuprofen, the main ingredient in popular painkillers. This, of course, raises a regulatory red flag, and it will be difficult to regulate what individuals in all parts of the world will do with access to the Internet and a 3D chemical printer.

Of course, anybody who has ever grown their own dope or made black powder for the hell of it (and then blown up a windowsill — sorry, Mom!) knows that you don't need high-tech to render prohibitions irrelevant. The Ottoman Empire's ban on tobacco failed because people ignored it, technology aside. Bans fail because enough people to whom the prohibitions apply refuse to obey them. Advancing technology just makes it easier to ignore laws with minimal effort and risk.

My own belief is that laws are relevant only for defining the penalties for engaging in acts that virtually everybody agrees are wrong. When prohibitionists sputter, "so ... so ... should we just legalize rape because some people still do it?" they're missing the point. Rape is rightfully and effectively illegal because almost everybody in our society agrees it's wrong and should be punished. It also has a victim who generally takes great exception to being abused and is inclined to seek punishment for the criminals. Take a victimless activity and add a constituency that thinks it's a good thing and that the law is what's wrong, and you have the perfect makings for legal impotence.

It's tempting to say that the age of prohibition is over, but in terms of practical enforcement, it really never happened at all. Politicians will sputter this year about guns and next year about something else that sticks in their craw. But those of us who don't want to be restricted won't be. And technology is making our quest for continued freedom ever easier.

http://reason.com/blog/2013/01/07/prohibitions-dont-work
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stephendare

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Looks like BT wasted his money on a gun when he could have just bought a 3D printer and made his own:

http://reason.com/blog/2013/01/07/prohibitions-dont-work

Prohibitions Don't Work, And New Technology Makes That More Obvious
J.D. Tuccille|January 7, 2013 8:48 pm

As I've mentioned before, the Ottoman Empire once punished tobacco use by death. That worked out so well, the law was rescinded a generation later amidst a cloud of fragrant smoke. Americans being slower learners, the war on drugs is a decades-old cliche in the United States, yet 42 percent of us have smoked grass and 16 percent of us have tried cocaine — the highest percentages recorded internationally by the World Health Organization. Likewise, gun controls have, as I've documented, met massive resistance for simple registration and laughable levels of compliance for confiscation schemes. Prohibitions have a wonderfully long track record of abject failure when it comes to eliminating, or even reducing the availability of, the things and behaviors at which they are targeted. And that's before we even get to the individually empowering world of new technology.

The popular prohibition movement of the moment has firearms in its ... err ... sights. Led by (really?) Vice President Joe Biden, a White House task force is apparently considering new gun laws that would restrict those scary-looking rifles known as "assault weapons," ban high-capacity magazines, track sales (maybe through registration?) and require whatever else the politicians in the group think will win them votes.

Meanwhile, a merry band of gun-rights activists known as Defense Distributed have been using 3D printing technology to develop the means of producing guns and related paraphernalia at home. Brian Doherty has already written about this development at length, and I've covered it myself. But as it happens, matters have moved forward, and Defense Distributed is now producing high-capacity magazines with 3D printers. The group's CEO, Cody Wilson, told Metro World News, "I have five people now making AK-47 magazines – they’re incredibly easy to reproduce."

That's in addition to the group's recent successes with producing actual gun receivers that work — even if the very first one broke after only six shots. Such success with a new technology is a clear sign of more to come as the technology, and expertise in using it, progresses. As Metro World News continued:

So how could the weapons be controlled? A spokesman for 3D print company Automaker said it is powerless; “we do not promote guns, but we cannot control the use of the product.” Neither can government intervene effectively, says Michael Weinberg, attorney specializing in emerging technologies for the U.S. Public Knowledge think tank. “When you apply anger over gun control to a general purpose technology there’s a lot of collateral damage”, he said. “It’s like if you regulate steel – a lot of productive areas would be lost. We don’t know enough about 3D printing to legislate the future.”

Basically, the cat is out of the bag. 3D printing means that prohibitions on mechanical devices — never successful in the past — are now more easily bypassed than ever.

Drugs, too, if a related technology known as chemical printing is any indicator. That technology is earlier in its development, but it holds promise for solving the orphan drug problem, and for making end-runs around drug prohibition. From the Huffington Post:

Recently, Professor Lee Cronin from the University of Glasgow has taken the idea of 3D printing a step further. He's using a $2,000 3D printer to print lab equipment--blocks containing chambers that connect to mixing chambers--and then injecting the desired ingredients into the chambers to produce organic and/or inorganic reactions that can yield chemicals, and in some cases new compounds.

Just as early 3D printers were used for rapid prototyping, his new chemical printer can initially be used to rapidly discover new compounds.  And if you look at the development of 3D printers, it is not hard to see that in the near future you could print highly specialized chemicals and even pharmaceuticals. The team is currently working on printing ibuprofen, the main ingredient in popular painkillers. This, of course, raises a regulatory red flag, and it will be difficult to regulate what individuals in all parts of the world will do with access to the Internet and a 3D chemical printer.

Of course, anybody who has ever grown their own dope or made black powder for the hell of it (and then blown up a windowsill — sorry, Mom!) knows that you don't need high-tech to render prohibitions irrelevant. The Ottoman Empire's ban on tobacco failed because people ignored it, technology aside. Bans fail because enough people to whom the prohibitions apply refuse to obey them. Advancing technology just makes it easier to ignore laws with minimal effort and risk.

My own belief is that laws are relevant only for defining the penalties for engaging in acts that virtually everybody agrees are wrong. When prohibitionists sputter, "so ... so ... should we just legalize rape because some people still do it?" they're missing the point. Rape is rightfully and effectively illegal because almost everybody in our society agrees it's wrong and should be punished. It also has a victim who generally takes great exception to being abused and is inclined to seek punishment for the criminals. Take a victimless activity and add a constituency that thinks it's a good thing and that the law is what's wrong, and you have the perfect makings for legal impotence.

It's tempting to say that the age of prohibition is over, but in terms of practical enforcement, it really never happened at all. Politicians will sputter this year about guns and next year about something else that sticks in their craw. But those of us who don't want to be restricted won't be. And technology is making our quest for continued freedom ever easier.

http://reason.com/blog/2013/01/07/prohibitions-dont-work

Yeah, I think we mentioned this earlier in the 3d printing threads.
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BridgeTroll

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lol... no thank you.  I wanted a high quality firearm... not a plastic piece of junk.
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."