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Author Topic: Southern Rock  (Read 20699 times)

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #135 on: December 11, 2012, 07:27:31 AM »
"Fat Man in the Bathtub"  Little Feat

<a href="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/VDp3Grz28mE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/VDp3Grz28mE</a>

http://www.littlefeat.net/

Quote
When Little Feat was at its best, the band blended complex rhythms, multiple styles and time signatures not only within the same song, but often within a few measures. Take the case of “Fat Man in the Bathtub,” one of the band’s signature originals, which features elements of funk, blues, doo-wop and Latin music underneath Lowell George’s gritty vocal delivery.

George’s lyrics tell the sad tale of protagonist “Spotcheck Billy,” who seems to be suffering from a lack of sex or drugs or both, depending on your view. Some have said that the song is an autobiographical account; that George is the “Fat Man in the Bathtub,” while others theorize that Lowell was referring to one of his many famous musician friends.

Little Feat first recorded “Fat Man in the Bathtub” for 1973’s Dixie Chicken, the band’s first album with Kenny Gradney on bass, Paul Barrere on second guitar and Sam Clayton on percussion. “Fat Man” saw its first live action in ‘73 and remained a staple of the group’s live repertoire throughout every period of their career.


http://phish.net/song/fat-man-in-the-bathtub/history
« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 07:31:08 AM by sheclown »

johnnyman

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #136 on: December 11, 2012, 08:56:16 AM »
This is  a great thread.  Bought some music last weekend (iTunes)based on all the suggestions that have been made here.  Seagal's music is really quite good.  That guy keeps surprising me.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 09:05:13 AM by johnnyman »

Traveller

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #137 on: December 11, 2012, 09:25:04 AM »
In addition to Drive By Truckers, another more recent band that's got a southern rock sound is Lucero out of Memphis.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #138 on: December 11, 2012, 11:42:47 AM »
"drink till were gone"  Lucero

<a href="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/_Pccu9tU8Yc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/_Pccu9tU8Yc</a>



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Biography

Lucero's sound has been described as a "synthesis of soul, rock, and country [that] is distinctly Memphisian."[1] The band had their start in Memphis, TN and played for the first time in early 1998. Since 2001, they have played between 150 and 200 shows a year across the United States and Canada and have been called "one of the hardest working bands of the last 10 years—on tour significantly more days than they are not."[2] Lucero has released eight full length albums.[3]

The members of Lucero are Roy Berry (drums), John C. Stubblefield (bass), Brian Venable (guitar), and Ben Nichols (guitar and vocals), Rick Steff (piano, organ, accordion), and Todd Beene (pedal steel). Todd Gill substituted for Brian Venable from 2003 to 2004. The band also experimented with guitarist Steve Selvidge in the early months of 2003.

In late 2008 the band announced they had signed a four album deal with Universal Music Group,[4] though the relationship with Universal was short-lived.[5] 1372 Overton Park was released October 6, 2009 by Universal Music Group and was the first Lucero album to feature a horn section.

Lucero's latest album, Women & Work, was released on March 13, 2012 by ATO Records. This new album integrates more of the horn section as well as the pedal steel guitar, keyboards and a gospel chorus.[6][7]

The first solo release from frontman Ben Nichols, The Last Pale Light in the West, was released in January 2009 on Lucero's label Liberty & Lament. The seven-song record was inspired by Cormac McCarthy's book Blood Meridian and recorded with Rick Steff on piano and accordion and Todd Beane on pedal steel.[8]

In May 2009, Nichols co-starred in MTV's $5 Cover, a Craig Brewer-produced quasi-fictionalized series about the Memphis music scene. A performance of Lucero's song "San Francisco" at the Young Avenue Deli in Memphis was featured in the trailer for the series.[9]

Ben Nichols' previous band was Red 40 in which he played alongside Colin Brooks and Steve Kooms.[10]

Drummer Roy Berry is half of experimental duo Overjoid[11] and was a member of the Memphis-based band The Simple Ones before joining Lucero.[12]

John C. Stubblefield has recorded with North Mississippi Allstars, Jim Dickinson and Sack Lunch, among others. He co-produced Hill Country Revue’s 2010 album Zebra Ranch.[13]

Brian Venable is Henry’s Dad.[14]

Rick Steff has recorded with Cat Power, Hank Williams Jr. and Dexys Midnight Runners, among others.[15]

Todd Beene is also currently a member of the Tennessee band Glossary.[16]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucero_%28band%29

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #139 on: December 12, 2012, 01:30:32 AM »
...and then there is the undisputed Holy Grail of Southern Rock:

<a href="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/hMHjjvLjtAM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/hMHjjvLjtAM</a>


A lover tells his beloved that he must be "traveling on" because he can't be "chained", but he's the one begging her from the beginning... "Will you still remember me?"  (He isn't nearly as free as he confesses to be.)

This is what makes this song so powerful.  The audience may know more than the freebird --  that he is tied to his love, his home, his family by far more than he'd like us to believe he is.

Or at least that is MHO.





sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #140 on: December 12, 2012, 07:56:06 AM »
Number 43:  "Bounty Hunter"  Molly Hatchet

<a href="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/e04HhHJtguc" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/e04HhHJtguc</a>

Last week, from their European tour.

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #141 on: December 12, 2012, 08:18:25 AM »
Always loved the Outlaws...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/R82OM5tzcrk" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/R82OM5tzcrk</a>

In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #142 on: December 12, 2012, 08:28:10 AM »
Ozark Mountain Daredevils... If you wanna get to Heaven... love the harmonica.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/eVtHMDJcmxE" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/eVtHMDJcmxE</a>

In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #143 on: December 12, 2012, 08:29:39 AM »
Thanks BridgeTroll!

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The Outlaws[1] are a southern rock/country rock band formed in Tampa, Florida in late 1967 by guitarist–vocalist Hughie Thomasson, drummer David Dix, bassist Phil Holmberg, guitarists Hobie O'Brien and Frank Guidry, plus singer Herb Pino. Guidry brought the name Outlaws with him when he joined (he had been in another group that had that name).
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While the Outlaws are generally considered to be a part of the southern rock genre, there are distinct differences in their approach and their influences. Their primary similarity to other southern rock bands is the dual lead guitar interplay, a defining characteristic of many southern rock bands. However, the Outlaws’ mix of country and rock elements displays the vocal harmony influences of groups like Buffalo Springfield, the Byrds, and Poco. Their use of three and four part harmonies set them apart from their contemporaries who usually relied on a single lead vocalist.

Hughie Thomasson's signature guitar playing style and voice were defining characteristics of the band's sound. Thomasson's guitar sound was underpinned by the use of the Fender Stratocaster (and sometimes a Fender Telecaster) played in a quasi-country style mixed with fluid, quick blues runs. Hughie was nicknamed "The Flame" for his flaming fast guitar work. He is a member of the Fender Hall of Fame.

The other lead guitarist, Billy Jones, played mainly a Gibson Les Paul and switched between a clean and distorted sound. A good example of this can be heard on "Green Grass and High Tides" on the right stereo channel. Hughie Thomasson's smooth Stratocaster sound can be heard on the left channel. Thomasson opens the first solo at the intro and plays the first half of the two succeeding longer solos all on the right channel. There are many video examples of his Green Grass solos on the internet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outlaws_%28band%29

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #144 on: December 12, 2012, 08:33:24 AM »
Question:  Is "Southern Rock" more closely defined by the sound or the bands original location?  I have a few more classics... but the bands began in Non southern areas of the country...
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #145 on: December 12, 2012, 08:34:42 AM »
Quote
The Ozark Mountain Daredevils are a Southern rock/country rock band formed in 1972 in Springfield, Missouri, USA. They are most widely known for their singles "If You Wanna Get To Heaven" in 1974 and "Jackie Blue" in 1975.

The Daredevils are also mentioned in the "Don's Story" chapter of American humorist David Sedaris' book Barrel Fever. Bassist Michael "Supe" Granda has also written a book about the band, It Shined.

sheclown

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #146 on: December 12, 2012, 08:40:38 AM »
Question:  Is "Southern Rock" more closely defined by the sound or the bands original location?  I have a few more classics... but the bands began in Non southern areas of the country...

Great question. 

Musically, it is defined by (Adam!  Help me!) an emphasis on the lead guitar.  Southern rock is all about the guitar man.  But additionally, it is about the lyrics.  Southern rock sings about a sense of place -- about home, working class values and struggles. 

The genre isn't about the origin of the band, IMHO, but of the elements of the song.

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #147 on: December 12, 2012, 08:49:57 AM »
Pure Prairie League... Band formed in Ohio... but I always put it in the Southern/country rock category...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/u4xp2lgiAjY" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/u4xp2lgiAjY</a>
In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

BridgeTroll

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #148 on: December 12, 2012, 09:00:14 AM »
New Riders of the Purple Sage... lives on the edge of southern/country rock... Formed in California... Grateful Dead influenced...

Panama Red... humorous weed song...

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/uyPYM5uUViI" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/uyPYM5uUViI</a>


In a boat at sea one of the men began to bore a hole in the bottom of the boat. On being remonstrating with, he answered, "I am only boring under my own seat." "Yes," said his companions, "but when the sea rushes in we shall all be drowned with you."

Traveller

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Re: Southern Rock
« Reply #149 on: December 12, 2012, 09:25:30 AM »
The line between Southern Rock and similar genres like Alt.country or Red Dirt can certainly be a blurry one.  Would you consider bands like Cross Canadian Ragweed, Reckless Kelly, or Shooter Jennings "Southern Rock"?