Author Topic: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte  (Read 3921 times)

JeffreyS

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2012, 10:14:09 PM »
Explore the back articles on this site you will be amazed.
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so.  Mark Twain

Ocklawaha

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #16 on: January 30, 2012, 11:28:22 PM »
1. The Omni and adjacent bank building and the Hilton complex, are both in Jacksonville DOWNTOWN because of the Skyway. Imagine how much more we would attract if we invested in rail that actually went where the people live, work and play?

2. The impoverished view of JTA is also largely skewed, stand by the Duval County Courthouse any morning or evening rush hour and tell me how many brief case toting executive types you see catching those buses. The fact that the transit map of Jacksonville has been largely planned with the 'poor mans transport' mentality makes this a self fulfilling conundrum. Throw some lines at Ponte Vedra, WGV, Nocatee, Argyle, and other upper income areas of Jacksonville's metro and watch this demographic change. Did you know for example, that Julington Creek Plantation has 'bus stops' (pedestrian shelters and kiosks at the front edge of the neighborhoods) as does much of WGV, already in place? Not a bus in sight!

OCK

tufsu1

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2012, 10:57:54 AM »
Hilton complex....the one in San Marco?

cityimrov

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2012, 02:41:31 PM »
Did you know for example, that Julington Creek Plantation has 'bus stops' (pedestrian shelters and kiosks at the front edge of the neighborhoods) as does much of WGV, already in place? Not a bus in sight!

If I remember my lessons correctly, aren't those bus stops in Julington Creek Plantation really only there to support the low wage workers for the residents who live there?  I mean, someone has to clean these houses. 

From the conversations I had with the average resident of this town and the lessons they taught me, asking them to take the bus is like asking them to risk their lives to take a cheaper form of transit.  Why risk their lives when they have a car? 

fsquid

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2012, 06:06:20 PM »
The bus shelters in Julington Creek are for the kids waiting on the school bus.

Ocklawaha

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2012, 08:44:57 PM »
If I remember my lessons correctly, aren't those bus stops in Julington Creek Plantation really only there to support the low wage workers for the residents who live there?  I mean, someone has to clean these houses. 

From the conversations I had with the average resident of this town and the lessons they taught me, asking them to take the bus is like asking them to risk their lives to take a cheaper form of transit.  Why risk their lives when they have a car?

Risk their lives to ride a bus? What planet did you drop in from? We simply are 'not there yet' and hopefully in spite of being a city with violent crime that exceeds most South American cities, unless you count rogue deer stampedes, our buses are pretty safe.

US...
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In partnership with the Youth Crisis Center, all JTA buses serve as a Safe Place, providing transportation to immediate help and shelter for runaways and teens in crisis. With JTA's participation, Jacksonville boasts the most Safe Places in any community in the United States.

THEM...
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November 13, 2010 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Most Dangerous Bus Route in New York City Identified The most dangerous bus in New York City is the M101 bus, according to The New York Post. Buses on this route crashed 268 times in 2009. The 12-mile route circling between Washington Heights and the East Village is one of New York's longest and busiest.

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DETROIT -- Death threats, beatings and even stabbings are not uncommon on at least five of the city's bus routes , fueling a mix of fear and anger among drivers and riders who are clamoring for a police presence.
Since the start of 2006, the first full year after Detroit cops stopped policing the buses , more than 50 people have been assaulted -- five of them stabbed, according to drivers' reports obtained by The Detroit News. One driver was dragged off the bus , pummeled and stabbed with an ink pen. Another miscarried after an armed man hijacked her bus . A four-person brawl sent two passengers to the hospital with stab wounds.
"It's to the point where you're afraid to ride at night," said Shirley Newman, 57, a frequent passenger on the Detroit Department of Transportation coaches.
The violence -- most prevalent on busy routes such as Grand River, Greenfield and Woodward - - comes as the City Council and Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick's administration battle over bus security.


Your non-transit using friends would do well to give any of our buses a try, I think they'd find they are quite comfortable, and they'd capture hundreds of hours annually by letting someone else do the driving while they caught up on the friendly hand held device. 

Your theory seems to be, "Since nobody wants to ride but the 'dangerous poor people,' we shouldn't support this system." My contention remains the same, the day that Julington Creek Plantation/Fruit Cove residents residents learn that the kids can get to the soccer field without the SUV, or to The Avenues, or Town Center, personal trips would skyrocket. The day that the breadwinners realize they can board a nice bus in Ponte Vedra/Nocatee/WGV and step off in front of the office on Bay Meadows Way, those routes will quickly change the perceived face of JTA. Granted it MUST BE MARKETED, and sold to the public so everyone realizes when/where and how the bus runs, but that is about all the bus side will need to radically change their demographics.

THANKS TO squid for the input on the Julington Creek 'bus shelters'. This has to be the closest thing to a turn key quality bus route in Florida, and it sits unused except for the kiddies and occasional sore footed joggers.

Ocklawaha

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2012, 08:45:54 PM »
Hilton complex....the one in San Marco?

Yes, according to the hotelier...

vicupstate

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2012, 10:30:35 AM »
The first phase of a $700mm development in Uptown (aka Downtown) Charlotte is about to begin.  Light Rail will run through part of the 8 block area, and border another part of it. 

Here is a map of the area and the plan.

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/09/21/3547422/map-first-ward-redevelopment-plan.html

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After talking about creating an urban village in First Ward since 1998, Levine Properties is finally planning to break ground in December on a project involving space for businesses, apartments and a park.

The city is also invested in the project: Up to $23.7 million in property taxes will go back to Levine Properties for the construction of parking decks, which will be for public and private use.

When the 15-year project is complete, First Ward, the area of uptown northeast of Trade and Tryon streets, will be home to a public park, three parking decks, apartments, office space, restaurants and stores. At least eight city blocks will be part of the urban village.

The project also includes extending 10th Street to connect Brevard and Tryon streets, said Daniel Levine, president of Levine Properties. The cost of the overall project could exceed $700 million.

The first phase of construction, which will cost $75 million, will include two parking decks, the park, 200 apartment units and the road connection. Levine said he expects the first phase of construction to last between 18 and 24 months.

Of the first two parking decks, one will be at Eleventh and Brevard streets and the other next to the UNC Charlotte uptown campus.

The First Ward project is a public-private venture because the parking decks will be funded through a tax increment grant with the city.

The grant will last for no more than 10 years, said Peter Zeiler, the city’s development and investment manager.

Levine Properties has to pay for the construction of the decks, but after they are built and property taxes are paid to the city, a portion of those property taxes will be returned to the company to defray the expense of the decks, which the city expects will cost $23.7 million.

Zeiler said whichever comes first – the end of 10 years or paying off the $23.7 million through property taxes – will end the city’s involvement in parking deck funding. In the long run, he said, the parking will pay for itself.

“The city, for the parking, is not paying any money out of the general fund,” Zeiler said. “The only source of funds is by taxes paid for the new development.”

The project’s original plan called for four parking decks, one of which would be below ground. But, because building an underground deck was too expensive, Levine Properties nixed it and expanded the plans for the other lots. Levine said there will be 1,335 spaces in the two decks.

One deck will be entirely public, and the other two will be a combination of public and private spaces, Zeiler said.

The city is involved in helping to fund the parking decks because there are parking areas already in use that will be demolished with the project’s construction, Zeiler said.

The public park will be across the street from ImaginOn, between Seventh and Brevard streets and extending into the next block where UNCC is.

Levine said the land for the park will be leveled.

“We will have an open area as big as a football field for concerts, fairs and throwing Frisbees around,” Levine said. “When we think of urban parks, we think of the Green, which is a beautiful park, but the park we’re talking about is more than five times the size of that park.”

The first phase also calls for 200 apartment units, although the project ultimately plans to include 1,500 units, Levine said. There are also 1.5 million square feet of office space planned, about 350 hotel rooms and about 350,000 square feet for street-level retail.

Levine Properties will build a privately owned road, Market Street, bordering the light rail between Seventh and Ninth streets. The company will also realign and rebuild parts of Brevard and Eighth streets, and Zeiler said the city will reimburse Levine with money that has already been allocated for uptown road improvements.

A new walkway will also be built to run from new apartments on 10th Street to UNCC.

Michael Smith, the president and chief executive officer of Charlotte Center City Partners, said he’s delighted with Levine’s plans for First Ward.

“This is a great way to knit those neighborhoods together and expand investment and expand jobs in the center city,” Smith said, adding that the project also improves First Ward’s infrastructure.

Levine said specifics on restaurants and stores have not been decided yet, but he thinks the eventual addition of such retail will fill a big void in uptown.

“One of the things we need in the center city is some fashion retail to round out some of the retail offerings,” he said. “I think our center city is on the verge of increasing residential population. When that happens ... those people want to participate in an urban lifestyle, and a lot of it has to do with urban retail or day-to-day living without having to get in their car and get to the shopping center.”
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vicupstate

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2012, 05:19:21 AM »
The renaissance continues...

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Two more large apartment buildings are slated for construction in Charlotte’s South End neighborhood.

Camden Property Trust said it plans to build a 10-story, 324-apartment building at West Boulevard and Camden Road, and a 266-apartment building at South Boulevard and Iverson Way. Camden already owns two large apartment buildings in South End.

Currently, South End has seven apartment buildings under construction, according to one development expert, and five more in the advanced planning phases, including the Camden properties.

“The neighborhood was at 96 percent occupancy,” said Ted Boyd with Center City Partners.

Boyd says the recent construction was part of the long-term plan to develop properties along the Lynx Blue Line. But as the light rail started, the economy sputtered, leaving projects on pause. Now both old and new projects are breaking ground.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/12/04/3706109/2-more-apartment-buildings-coming.html#storylink=cpy
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fsquid

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2012, 08:40:04 AM »
and to think a decade ago, the only thing there were old industrial buildings and run down strip malls.

tufsu1

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #25 on: December 05, 2012, 09:45:47 AM »
I was just in Charlotte this past weekend...and there is a massive new development occurring along the light rail line....seems to span both sides of the track and is at least 2 blocks long.

Ocklawaha

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #26 on: December 05, 2012, 12:50:10 PM »
I was just in Charlotte this past weekend...and there is a massive new development occurring along the light rail line....seems to span both sides of the track and is at least 2 blocks long.

This is pure BS!

I have it on reliable authority...

Well....

....more like delirious, raving authority...

...that RAIL doesn't spur growth!

Randal O'Toole, the Cato 'expert' that studied forestry and earns his pay from Oil Company symposiums said so!

thelakelander

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2012, 01:10:34 PM »
Ock, I'm sure O'Toole would tell you there was no property left in town for what they are developing, so all they could do is set up next to an LRT station.

I-10east

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #28 on: December 05, 2012, 04:14:25 PM »
I really can't wait for the next Charlotte update...

Ocklawaha

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Re: LRT Stimulating Economic Renaissance in Charlotte
« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2012, 11:35:00 PM »
I really can't wait for the next Charlotte update...

I can't either, Charlotte is now moving on reestablishment of the old Piedmont and Northern Interurban line. A shortline operates it for freight right now and the City/County are making them a deal. Not all that much different then Jacksonville rebuilding the old Seaboard S Line from Union Station to North Main Street and Airport Road. We can learn much from their experience and reap even bigger rewards. BUT WE'VE GOT TO ACT!