Author Topic: Downtown Bars: A History  (Read 15860 times)

Non-RedNeck Westsider

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #45 on: July 08, 2011, 08:23:49 PM »
British stamina!

LOL, I think it also comes in 'powder' form.   ;)
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marksjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #46 on: July 08, 2011, 09:10:55 PM »
LOL powder substance...
I think Keith Richards record for staying awake is 9 days in a row (yikes)!

Field, if memory serves the 1975 tour had the 60' inflatable penis that Jagger 'rode' on stage. They banned them in San Antonio for this reason. I think by Jax the penis had been eliminated from the stage show due to 'hydraulic issues' or technical difficulties  of some sort. Wild band in their prime. Still the best stage show I ever saw and I've seen a few.


Joey Michitsch

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #47 on: January 21, 2013, 03:09:58 AM »
I noticed someone mentioned Stacey Newton.  Because the performers of that time was pre internet, it is hard to find any mention of them.  I very much miss Stacey, Carolyn Fry, Maxine Marshall. 

sheclown

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #48 on: January 21, 2013, 07:43:22 AM »
from "Lynyrd Skynyrd:An Oral History" by Lee Ballinger

Quote
Judy Van Zant:

I was born in Georgia and I moved to Jacksonville in 1968.  I met Dean Kilpatrick first, he was a friend of mine and one of the roadies who was really with the band the whole time.  He introduced me to Gary [Rossington].  There were playing in a place in Jacksonville called the Comic Book Club and I worked downtown, and I went over there when I got off work and Dean introduced me to Gary and I met Ronnie a little bit later.  The Comic Book Club was a very cool, nonalcoholic club that everyone hung out at.  You could go there on any given night and someone like Gregg Allman or Duane Allman would drop in, people like that.  The Allman Brothers actually lived in Jacksonville and formed in Jacksonville.  We lived on Riverside Avenue in one house called the Green House and down the street was the Gray House where Berry Oakley and his wife, Linda, lived and Duane and his girlfriend and Gregg would come in all the time.  There was a place called the Forest Inn where everyone played; Friendship Park, there would be free concerts there, there was a lot going on, a lot of places to play.

avonjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #49 on: January 21, 2013, 09:43:35 AM »
I googled R&R Liquors and stumbled on this cool site:

http://www.sweethomemusic.fr/Interviews/DaysOfLoveAndBloodUS.php

I can't believe this article! Some, or most of Southern Rock was born in an Apartment/Hotel ABOVE the R&R Lounge, a lounge I frequented, and in which the old Apartment/Hotel that these stars would collaborate in, which was above the R&R Lounge, would later turn into a Gay Bar called "The French Quarter," in which I also frequented with a Bisexual Friend of mine in the mid and late 70's. Wow! You never know about things until you dig on the internet in our internet and information laced age! Thanks "Urbanlibertarian" for this article. As a Musician I really appreciate the info relative to Rock and Roll, Soul, and Rhythm and Blues groups and bands and how they collaborated, and how all these genres are reated to each other and Southern Rock was born in Jacksonville, and some or most of it born in a place that would later become a gay bar upstairs over the old R&R Lounge that I frequented as a young Sailor; all I can say is......WOW!!!!!!!

"HU"

I wanted to add a couple of thoughts. My Grandfather and Uncle were bartenders at the R&R in the very early 40's. And how sad that we had to demolish a building that contained an important part of the early history of Southern Rock. Also the R&R became a gay bar at the end of its life.
This is even more reason to have a Southern Rock Museum right here where it was born.
The OP was a gay bar almost in name only. Everybody went because it was two stories and a great place to dance.
Again the block where it was located had some great buildings that foolishly were demolished. The potential in that area was amazing, yet JTA razed it. I'm actually sad and also glad that many of you did and didn't get to know that part of town. Sad because it was a great experience but glad because you would be sick to your stomach if you could remember what was lost when they gutted and destroyed a great area and left it to dirt and weeds.
Downtown Jacksonville would be a completely different place if we had not destroyed so much of our history and particularly west of Broad Street.
I still get sad, driving down Forsyth Street where the Seminole Hotel used to stand. How on earth did we allow that  incredible building to be destroyed. By the way one of the Indians on the facade is in the Museum of Florida History in Tallahassee. Imagine what could be done with that building now. And I still daydream about what could have been in the areas surrounding the Prime Osborne.

avonjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #50 on: January 21, 2013, 09:51:57 AM »
Heights that is a great article about the birth of Southern Rock right here in our city. Wish Judy Van Zant had opened Freebird Cafe in Downtown Jax now that I know where it all started.

I remember the Atlanta Rhythm Section opened for the Stones in the Gator Bowl in !975. Must have been about 70,000 there that day. For $10 you saw The Atlanta Rhythm Section, Chaka Khan with Rufus, The J Geils Band (w/Peter Wolf) and then the Rolling Stones. Quite the deal!

I know this is an old post but it was Labelle that opened for the Stones, not Chaka and Rufus. That was a great experience. There were so many people smoking pot at that concert I'm surprised the cops weren't  high just from the second hand smoke. LOL.

marksjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #51 on: January 21, 2013, 11:13:46 AM »
Definitely was Chaka not LaBelle. Remember her huge hair?
And it was brutally hot as referenced by this link:

 http://en.allexperts.com/q/Rolling-Stones-578/2009/9/f/Stones-Gator-Bowl-1975.htm

Captain Zissou

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #52 on: January 21, 2013, 11:19:41 AM »
Quote
I remember the Atlanta Rhythm Section opened for the Stones in the Gator Bowl in !975. Must have been about 70,000 there that day. For $10 you saw The Atlanta Rhythm Section, Chaka Khan with Rufus, The J Geils Band (w/Peter Wolf) and then the Rolling Stones. Quite the deal!

I was there for that!  When the Stones played 'Honkey Tonk Woman' two gigantic inflatable women sprung up on stage left and right. 

Field.... How old are you???  If you can recall a concert from 1975, then you're not as young as I imagined.

marksjax

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #53 on: January 21, 2013, 02:17:21 PM »
I think Field is referring to the 1989 Gator Bowl Stones show. I think that one had the inflatable "Ladies".
The Stones are now somewhat dismissed as ancient but in their day they were quite ahead of the curve.
They pretty much invented the complex and innovative staging that is now quite commonplace for rock shows.

Check out this article and realize this was being done nearly 40 years ago.

http://www.concertstagedesign.com/2011/04/rolling-stones-tour-of-americas-1975.html?m=1

fieldafm

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #54 on: January 21, 2013, 02:22:04 PM »
Mark is right, it was the Stones show in '89. 

sheclown

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #55 on: January 21, 2013, 05:19:59 PM »
Quote
After touring England and most of the continent of Europe, I returned to Jacksonville. The Classics IV, The Bitter Ind., The Second Coming, future members of The Atlanta Rhythm Section and several other rockers like Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Molly Hatchet Band were beginning to eat, sleep and drink rock 'n roll. Other bands like Blackfoot would soon follow. Southern rock was in the womb and Jacksonville was the mother.

great quote from "The Days of Love & Blood" -- I'm going to use it in the Southern Rock thread.
Quote
Later, I was in Jacksonville to discover Gregg, Duane and company were crashing above the R&R Liquor Store on Main Street. It was a funky old apartment with nothing but mattresses and music. This was the real beginnings of Southern Rock.

Where on Main Street???
« Last Edit: January 21, 2013, 05:25:58 PM by sheclown »

Timkin

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #56 on: January 21, 2013, 05:25:46 PM »
Definitely miss the OP ... one of my favorite places from the past.   I presume the end came for it with the replacement of the Acosta Bridge.    A lot of fun times there.

DDC

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #57 on: January 21, 2013, 08:33:45 PM »
Glad this got bumped. Great reading. Some were talking about the building that housed Voodoo and then The Sinclair, currently Secrets. Before Voodoo, who remembers Joann's Chili Bordello? I was fortunate to spend a little time in the 90's in that place. Closest places to a real "Cheers" Bar ever. Where everyone knows your name.  :)
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Foots

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #58 on: August 29, 2015, 02:58:45 PM »
Quote
After touring England and most of the continent of Europe, I returned to Jacksonville. The Classics IV, The Bitter Ind., The Second Coming, future members of The Atlanta Rhythm Section and several other rockers like Lynyrd Skynyrd and the Molly Hatchet Band were beginning to eat, sleep and drink rock 'n roll. Other bands like Blackfoot would soon follow. Southern rock was in the womb and Jacksonville was the mother.

great quote from "The Days of Love & Blood" -- I'm going to use it in the Southern Rock thread.
Quote
Later, I was in Jacksonville to discover Gregg, Duane and company were crashing above the R&R Liquor Store on Main Street. It was a funky old apartment with nothing but mattresses and music. This was the real beginnings of Southern Rock.

Where on Main Street???

SE corner of Main and Ashley.  I worked there (and other night spots) 1969-71 for the Provost/Renzler Consortium.

Serious card turners frequented the Waldorf Lounge at E Forsyth and Market; and in the back of Pete's Bar at 517 W Bay between the James Hotel and Pete's Pawn.

Let's not overlook Hans Tanzler's role in screwing with Jax nightlife.  On a humorous note, in late 1971, the city council attempted to outlaw topless dancing and the response was the dancers went bottomless.  I spent a couple of weeks frequently visiting the DCJ posting their bail until the council backed off.

As for corruption, over the years the reputations of Tom Heaney and Dorcas Drake have been sanitized.....but you didn't do liquor business or gambling unless you paid someone.

Oh....as far as I'm concerned, Southern Rock didn't take off until the night Ed King ripped the opening riff of Sweet Home Alabama in the Comic Book Club.

Been a great read and y'all take care.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2015, 03:54:01 PM by Foots »

heights unknown

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Re: Downtown Bars: A History
« Reply #59 on: August 29, 2015, 07:10:00 PM »
Here are a few of my favorites.

1.  Metropolis.   This was on Monroe Street in between Main and Laura.  The owners had been former bartenders at Docksides in orteg/avondale and the opened up this very cool place with Neil Levitsky.  They ended up leaving the building and opening the Milk Bar.  Neil then went on to become one of the founding partners of the original Club Five, and afterwards opened up Starlite Cafe, which is now Birdie's in five points.

2.  MotoLounge.  I absolutely loved this place.  Owned by Lisa Leuthold, it was hipster swing heaven.  On Adams Street just a little further up from the Milk Bar.

3.  The French Quarter.  This was a black draq queen bar on Main Street.  Screaming Drag Queens, over the top fabulosity and campy nonsense on three floors of gay mayhem.  It was naturally demolished.
Hi; I am severely old school. I lived in Jax in the 1960's, we moved away in 1967, and 7 years later I joined the Navy and my first duty station was NAS Cecil Field with an Air Squadron, Attack Squadron 15. Naturally as a Sailor, and intimately familiar with Jacksonville (as a child we lived in Lavilla in one of those 2 story rooming houses at 817 west Duval), I knew where everything was. As best I can remember, I will share what clubs were down there, at the time, that I frequented. One more thing, I was pretty liberal back then (still am), and me and a friend, who was bisexual, would crawl from bar to bar...so, here we go: 1) Howards Bar - a strip joint which was at the foot of the Main Street Bridge, kind of east; 2) R&R Lounge - A strip joint which was at the corner of church and main as I remember correctly...this was one of my favorite hangouts on the weekend, and for Sailors from the 3 Navy bases back in the day; 3) The French Quarter - yes, it was a gay bar, and yes, us Sailors would sneak in...it was right above and on top of the R&R Lounge which was a strip joint, and, there was a secret stairway from the R&R Lounge up to the French Quarter (if you knew the bartenders or the owner they would let you go upstairs to the gay bar)...kind of weird but this happened; 4) The Night Owl Lounge - A strip bar on church street one block west of main right down from the French Quarter gay bar and the R&R Lounge...this was also frequented quite often by Sailors; 5) The Flamingo Bar and Lounge - on Main street between duval and church, not far from The French Quarter, R&R Lounge, and The Night Owl Lounge...THIS PLACE WAS WILD AND OFF THE CHAIN AND I LOVED IT...all kinds of people came into the Famingo to water down before hitting the strip joints, gay clubs, and other night clubs downtown...straights, gays, bisexuals, transgenders, drag queens, everyone came to the flamingo, and, we had a super great time and NO ONE WAS PHOBIC...even Sailors in uniform came in from time to time as did Sailors like me in civilian clothes..during the day the Flamingo was traditionally straight...but around 5:00 PM or so, all of the goblins and gouls came out and into it...and it was off the chain....it closed down in 1984; 6) Old Plantation or "OP" - a disco at the foot of riverside avenue and water street where the spaghetti overpasses now are in downtown...it was the only building there before it was demolished...all kinds of people also frequented the OP; 7) The Producers - was a gay and straight friendly disco which was on the top floor of the old Mayflower Hotel where the Everbank building (formerly Southern Bell) now is...It was lovely up there as you could see the River...Monroe Midyette, now deceased, and who was the owner of several gay clubs and other bars and watering holes in Jax back in the day, was the Owner of this disco...Monroe was also the owner of the French Quarters, the gay bar which sat on the second floor on top of the R&R "strip club" Lounge on the corner of church and main; 8) Brothers Disco - was a gay club and straight friendly club where the old 3D (now a lesbian club "INKAHOOTZ" I understand) was located...Brothers was very nice and was also owned, initially, by Monroe Midyette (I might be wrong,  I think Monroe had a partner named Don); 9) There were numerous rinky dink taverns/bars that were on main street in Springfield but these were very roughshod filled with red necks, street hustlers (male), prostitutes (female), and anyone else who frequented them....these type of bars/taverns were all throughout springfield back in the day when springfield was run down, very low income, etc...these little bars and taverns had all types of races and ethnicities who frequented them as well, so though they were run or mostly frequented by rednecks, blacks, Mexicans, etc. also frequented them. This is it for now; no, I am not gay, but I am very liberal and always hung out with everyone regardless of who they were. We had fun back then and enjoyed ourselves without ipads, iphones, computers, cell phones, etc. Just saying. I'll add more as I can remember...it's been a long, long time.
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