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The Most Expensive Road Projects in Florida

A brief look at the Florida Department of Transportation's most expensive roadway construction projects currently underway.

Published February 20, 2014 in Transit      17 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article




9. U.S. 19 - $207 million



Location: Pinellas County

FDOT District: 7

US 19 is the main north-south thoroughare in the Bay Area's Pinellas, Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus counties.

Although a variety of improvements are underway or proposed along the highway throughout the region, in Pinellas County, US 19 is being upgraded into a limited access facility. Construction currently underway will eliminate traffic signals and replace them with new interchanges between Whitney Road and County Road 95, just north of Clearwater. Summer 2015 is the date of anticipated completion.

For more information: http://myus19.com/










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17 Comments

tufsu1

February 20, 2014, 06:58:04 AM
I am very impressed by this list.  I really like the look of all these 12-16 lane highways.  Can't wait for the $2 Billion rebuild of I-4 to start next year.  It will be gorgeous!

http://www.moving-4-ward.com/

JayBird

February 20, 2014, 07:45:01 AM
Interesting how the I275 widening drawings have rail included. Is that actually a component to FDOT's plans? If so, what are they doing that Jacksonville isn't?

Bridges

February 20, 2014, 08:05:55 AM
That's a lot of money on public transportation projects that will never turn a profit. 

I-10east

February 20, 2014, 09:10:44 AM
Only in Florida...All of that tax money gone to waste. Other states like Maine and Wyoming rather invest in things worthwhile, while Florida continues to bankrupt taxpayers with these lengthy asphalt monstrosities! (A fake parody rant).  :D 

stephendare

February 20, 2014, 09:11:52 AM
Only in Florida...All of that tax money gone to waste. Other states like Maine and Wyoming rather invest in things worthwhile, while Florida continues to bankrupt taxpayers with these lengthy asphalt monstrosities! (A fake parody rant).  :D

its too bad that you think that way. 

I-10east

February 20, 2014, 09:17:53 AM
^^^With a constantly growing population (soon to be third in the country), expanding highways just comes along with the turf. Highways will never be profitable, but so is human resources within businesses, and that's needed.

tufsu1

February 20, 2014, 09:32:42 AM
^^^With a constantly growing population (soon to be third in the country), expanding highways just comes along with the turf.

Not necessarily.  Expanding mobility opportunities is needed, but that mobility can come in many forms.

tufsu1

February 20, 2014, 09:34:21 AM
Interesting how the I275 widening drawings have rail included. Is that actually a component to FDOT's plans? If so, what are they doing that Jacksonville isn't?

It is not something FDOT is paying for at this time, but many of the state's master plans contemplate rail in the median.  That said, rail will have a hard time being even remotely successful if I-275 is 14 lanes wide 

pierre

February 20, 2014, 09:38:44 AM
I should have been a civil engineer. So many big money road projects in Florida.

Bridges

February 20, 2014, 10:04:37 AM
^^^With a constantly growing population (soon to be third in the country), expanding highways just comes along with the turf. Highways will never be profitable, but so is human resources within businesses, and that's needed.

Wish people would apply the same line of thinking to alternative modes of transportation.  But every time streetcar or bus or rail gets brought up, the old "not profitable" line gets trotted out. 

I-10east

February 20, 2014, 10:45:32 AM
^^^I don't disagree with you. Many urbanists seem to go by that 'there's no room for both of us' mindset with highways vs transit, similar to the city vs the suburbs. IMO they are two different animals (highways and transit options). New York and many other metros is still car congested, despite it's great transit options.   

stephendare

February 20, 2014, 10:48:23 AM
^^^I don't disagree with you. Many urbanists seem to go by that 'there's no room for both of us' mindset with highways vs transit, similar to the city vs the suburbs. IMO they are two different animals (highways and transit options). New York and many other metros is still car congested, despite it's great transit options.

you keep talking about imaginary urbanists and yet every post youve ever written on the subject shows that you literally have never even listened to or been in a room with one.

You can research these things you know.  And in the five years of you talking about these mysterious and dangerous strawmen, you could have actually even gotten a degree in urban planning from a correspondence course.

Or you could just hang out and make up things that you think urbanists think.

thelakelander

February 20, 2014, 01:18:50 PM
^^^I don't disagree with you. Many urbanists seem to go by that 'there's no room for both of us' mindset with highways vs transit, similar to the city vs the suburbs. IMO they are two different animals (highways and transit options). New York and many other metros is still car congested, despite it's great transit options.   

Funny. I've always seen it the other way around. Not a peep about spending $2 billion to build the Outer Beltway in the middle of cow pastures and environmentally sensitive property but ask for $10 million to expand the Skyway to Brooklyn and all hell breaks loose.

thelakelander

February 20, 2014, 01:24:21 PM
That said, rail will have a hard time being even remotely successful if I-275 is 14 lanes wide.



Yeah, I can see how such a solution would struggle to be successful. I still believe Kennedy and Cypress are better corridors for LRT, even if they cost more to construct initially. Nevertheless, at least they are actively having the discussion of how to make an interstate highway's ROW more multimodal friendly.

This graphic is pretty old but gives someone not familiar with Tampa an idea of the corridors mentioned above:


http://www.sptimes.com/News/100499/photos/tp-trains4.jpg

tufsu1

February 20, 2014, 01:53:49 PM
I still believe Kennedy and Cypress are better corridors for LRT, even if they cost more to construct initially.

I don't disagree, but all indications are that ship has sailed

IrvAdams

February 20, 2014, 02:25:23 PM
When I think of the growth in our city, I picture ever-widening concentric circles of edge development connected by expressways, but they just keep missing the obvious bulls-eye in the center.

Know Growth

February 20, 2014, 08:08:07 PM
Thankfully not  on this most masterful review list- going back to the 1970's,and spits and lurches afterwards; Clay County/Orange Park proposed Kingsley Avenue westward extension to Brannon/Chaffee.
My assembled files garnered over the years must simply be collector item at this point.
Traversing through......well, over a broad wetland belt, a regional water recharge natural system feature,the proposed roadway would essentially entail a mini Buckman,and a 1980's price tag in the many tens of millions.
There were a series of County Commission Resolutions, DOT nudged,all the elements to a point. As a matter of Public Record,speculative land purchase occurred-classic dandy with two parcels adjoining at the centerline of phantom "S.R. 228-A".

And across the way to the west at the Brannon Chaffe Corridor similar speculative maneuvers occurred at the north half of Section 19. The players keenly imbedded in Clay County Growth management and political/socio world.  8)

Students might be interested in other ancillary roadways related to the Beltway not noted here- East/West connectors entailing additional wetland belt intrusion-all to be properly growth managed,mitigated of course.

The Florida Wildlife Federation and this writer strived valiantly, and successfully in re-routing the Beltway away from the Ravines Conservation Area,a component of the Jennings Forest public lands complex.
At one time,the Trust For Public Lands held an option on 1800 acres along Brannon Chaffee,much of which became Oak Leaf.
During critical Brannon/Chaffee permitting process with the federal United States Army Corps of Engineers and St Johns Water Management District,Mayor Delaney's lodged strong support for the I-10 to Blanding leg,which was erroneously described as a "Stand Alone" project with "No Current Plans" for expansion.
The Mayor's support visibly relaxed permit agency stance.
On the morning of Brannon/Chaffee opening ceremony,USACOE head Colonel Joe Miller called me via cell phones- to apologize. Colonel Joe Miller would become City of Jacksonville Public Works director for a brief time.
The USACOE and WMD permitting file became target of unprecedented Public Information request.

 
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