Follow Us

Saturday, April 19, 2014
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
 

Springfield: What to Watch in 2014

The next 12 months are poised to see significant changes in the Springfield historic district with a number of projects, policy, and trends that could have a huge impact on our transitioning community... or not. No matter the outcome, here's what to keep an eye on in 2014.

Published February 3, 2014 in Development      38 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article



(2) Councilman Lumb's legislation to help potential renovators



For over a year, At-Large Group 5 City Councilman Robin Lumb has been examining the issue of how to get vacant, derelcit properties with mountains of accumulated code violation fines into the hands of property owners willing to renovate. Today, the owners of these properties have little incentive to sell or rehab them: the sum of fines inhibit owners from investing in their property, which are often underwater, and these fines even stick with the property upon sale to a new owner. Not exactly appealing to most potential buyers. Time is ticking down on Lumb's first term, and despite all the talk, no legislation has been introduced to resolve it. Is this the year?



 PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 NEXT 






Share this article   digg   delicious   reddit   myspace   technorati   google   newsvine  

38 Comments

Noone

February 03, 2014, 04:21:55 AM
Nice article Bill.

 just a few observations and concerns. Let's remember 2013-384 and the armory and nobody on the Jacksonville city council would attach an amendment to the armory deal for a buck a year that would allow for 24/7 Public Access to Hogans Creek. The applicants were supportive after the Public Hearing. Not good. Another concern about access to Hogans Creek was exacerbated from revelations at a recent DIA Board meeting. Also Not good. but HEY! Let's get ready to give the guy with Palms Fish Camp a million bucks for never even opening up the door and I have a JEA house that I'll sell you next to Exchange Club Island and still have that open contest for anyone that can share with all of us the brand new Waterways signage that was never before Waterways.

Will post more. Has anyone seen the massive clear cutting along Hogans Creek. So we planted some tress in the upper basin of Hogans Creek. How many? What was the cost? A volunteer effort? What types?

JaxByDefault

February 03, 2014, 06:56:26 AM
"unique projects involving container housing, modern design, and ultra-green housing" -- Sounds great! Looking forward to seeing those types of infill projects in the neighborhood. I've been admiring the solar systems on the two new houses on Liberty. (Of course, it's always great to see more old houses get the love they need, too.)


I just wish someone would put a good bar/distillery tap room back in the old Pearl location. Main Street needs more night life.



Stephen

February 03, 2014, 08:31:01 AM
No Lumb.....No Love....No LumbLove.

ChriswUfGator

February 03, 2014, 09:52:08 AM
Lumb's legislation has been a perennial topic of conversation for 3 years but when push came to shove he hasn't done anything about it. He was interested at first, we had several meetings with him, culminating in a public meeting, and it seemed as though he understood what the issues were. But for whatever reason it's been quite some time since then and nothing has happened. This goes into the "believe it when I see it" category at this point.

FWIW I think he got pushback from MCCD through the office of general counsel, which operates as a de facto lobbying arm whenever one city department feels threatened by another. I suspect he is falling into the trap of "these people are just complaining about problems they caused," or "COJ has $140mm in fines, look how much money that is!" (doesn't matter since it's uncollectible), or "this is working!" (It isn't, at all).

jcjohnpaint

February 03, 2014, 10:02:07 AM
I just visited the 'Over the Rhine' neighborhood in Cinci.  I really feel that Springfield has similar potential unlike R/A and Murray Hill due to such close proximity to DT.  I should be posting some picture from my trip in a few days. 
 

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

February 03, 2014, 10:06:03 AM
This big white Queen Anne Victorian or whatever victorian is really nice all white, however, I hope at a time soon in the future, the owners will honor this house by turning it into a painted lady!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Painted_ladies

https://www.google.com/search?q=painted+ladies&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=HbDvUrqFEoXLsAS7qYGQAQ&ved=0CAgQ_AUoAg&biw=1280&bih=872#q=victorian+painted+ladies&tbm=isch

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

February 03, 2014, 10:15:40 AM
I just visited the 'Over the Rhine' neighborhood in Cinci.  I really feel that Springfield has similar potential unlike R/A and Murray Hill due to such close proximity to DT.  I should be posting some picture from my trip in a few days. 
 


Thank you!   Most looking forward to seeing your pics and backgroud on those neighborhoods and how they revitalized themselves.

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

February 03, 2014, 10:19:48 AM
I'm sure that the Armory would make a great Confederate museum and we need to remember our history, all of our history and how we evolved from it.

With that said, I, for one, truly believe the Armory would better be served as an arts community clubhouse where artist can work, galleries to showcase art and function rooms open to us during the day, evenings and weekends.

Let's put ART INTO ARMORY

Dennis

February 03, 2014, 10:28:04 AM
Poor Springfield.. I wonder if anything will help in the long run...

thelakelander

February 03, 2014, 10:35:12 AM

I just visited the 'Over the Rhine' neighborhood in Cinci.  I really feel that Springfield has similar potential unlike R/A and Murray Hill due to such close proximity to DT.  I should be posting some picture from my trip in a few days. 
 

I'm looking forward to seeing your pics as well. I'd love to see Springfield's park system receive a makeover like OTR's Washington Park. OTR also has a "State & Union" situation in the form of Central Parkway (the old canal where the neighborhood's name comes from).

peestandingup

February 03, 2014, 11:09:07 AM
Poor Springfield.. I wonder if anything will help in the long run...

Getting people (not just developers snatching up properties) into the homes will help, along with removing rolling fines that'll never be paid anyway. Also better connection to downtown (as said in the article).

But I think ultimately Springfield will get its true turn once the Riverside area becomes too expensive & people start looking for cheaper alternatives that offer the same urban feel, connectivity & the amenities that it brings.

sheclown

February 03, 2014, 12:00:38 PM
Springfield's great.

 It is perfect as it is and it will be more perfect tomorrow.

jcjohnpaint

February 03, 2014, 12:22:12 PM
I only got shots in downtown and Walnut Hills.  There was a really bad storm that cut through and I was only able to drive through.  I have to say the new with the old looks amazing.  The lower part of the neighborhood south of Liberty seems to be pretty densified now.  North of Liberty seems pretty run down still, but just as much potential. 

mtraininjax

February 03, 2014, 02:07:51 PM
Quote
Main Street needs more night life.

There you go, as Main Street goes so goes Springfield, property values, and quality of life.

Bill Hoff

February 03, 2014, 02:42:12 PM
That would be incorrect.

The residential revitalization in the 'hood is far ahead of the commercial corridor. And property values were sky high, rock bottom, and now reasonably recovered, all without much change on Main Street.

While it'd be great to see more activity on Main Street, the sheer size/length related to the # of households around it is problematic, as is much of the ownership. Because of this, you've seen popular businesses open off Main. And also because of this, the commercial corridors off Main Street could see notable gains first, like portions of Pearl Street and the warehouse district. Both of which have successfully staple businesses now, and additional interested suitors making plans.

But, with all that said, there's new businesses in the works for Main Street now. Nothing earth shattering, but positive non the less.

stephendare

February 03, 2014, 02:53:19 PM
Actually, not trying to be disagreeable here Bill, but thats really nonsense.

The main obstacle to the neighborhood now (as it has been for a while) is Main Street.  And the corridor was destroyed by a combination of three things.

1. The economic downturn.

2. SPAR.

3. The Main Street reconstruction.

While there are businesses surviving off main street, they arent really wildly successful, and they wont be until Main Street is revived.  Hopefully SPAR has moved beyond trying to block business openings, threatening litigation against new business owners, boycotts and outright lobbying for demolitions.

If there is some commitment to helping Main Street succeed, then Main Street will succeed.  If there is a commitment to controlling the business environment without personally investing (and thereby exerting the only really direct control there is) then it will continue to remain empty.

Chris Farley, (although I don't seem to be able to personally work up much enthusiasm for her--which Im sure is entirely mutual) was pretty instrumental to the early start on Main Street when she organized the Springfield Souk on September 28, 2002.

It was exactly the kind of tactical urbanism that the neighborhood needed (and needs) and her idea should be revisited and made a regular thing.

GreyScale

February 03, 2014, 03:41:25 PM
My only concern is how the city will address the rough neighborhoods that create a horseshoe around the Springfield area.  If an individual travels to far East they’ll be greeted by the juvenile detention center, massive industrial buildings (some viable business, some rotting shells), and what is predominately a drug and gang infested area; North is much of the same; West (Northwest), passing under I95 is a continuation of the familiar trends.  In my opinion addressing the East and North banks that surround the Springfield district would be the best as the West is somewhat separated by the interstate.  Maybe this isn’t a huge concern for some, but something to consider nevertheless. 

stephendare

February 03, 2014, 03:46:10 PM
My only concern is how the city will address the rough neighborhoods that create a horseshoe around the Springfield area.  If an individual travels to far East they’ll be greeted by the juvenile detention center, massive industrial buildings (some viable business, some rotting shells), and what is predominately a drug and gang infested area; North is much of the same; West (Northwest), passing under I95 is a continuation of the familiar trends.  In my opinion addressing the East and North banks that surround the Springfield district would be the best as the West is somewhat separated by the interstate.  Maybe this isn’t a huge concern for some, but something to consider nevertheless.

meh.  this kind of thinking doesnt ever really do anything.

Change occurs when the good things are more attractive than the bad things.

You should have seen what Manhattan was surrounded by a few years ago.

Welcome to the forums btw.

Bill Hoff

February 03, 2014, 05:50:09 PM
Thanks for your perspective on Main Srreet Stephen, though I don't think it's accurate. I do agree with you concerning Grey's comment.

Growing up in Riverside, when it was considered somewhat rough and before it's mass popularity, similar concerns were expressed about Mixon Town, Hollybrook, & parts of Murray Hill. "Too close, etc".

What was true then and true now, and true across the country (gentrifying historic neighborhoods is not a unique experiment in Jacksonville), is that positive investment attracts other positive investment, and the surrounding areas reap the benefits (improve) of the upward bound neighborhood as well.

Grey, significant improvement project(s) in the Eastside neighborhood along A Philip Randolph are on the table for discussion now.




strider

February 03, 2014, 06:08:04 PM
What's interesting to me is that while the residential areas North of Springfield have always been much worse the commercial areas have always done much better. Lots more businesses, fewer empty buildings and while it certainty took a hit like the rest of us, no where near as bad as Main Street in Springfield. Attitudes of the local organizations (SPR to MetroNorth) back then certainty played a part in all that.  Fortunately, SPAR is changing and is getting better.

Mr Lumb, well, we'll just say good luck with all that.  Nothing has happened yet and I do not see it happening with him, maybe if someone better gets elected in his place, real progress can be made. In his defense, no council person has had the b... - tenacity - to go up against Code Compliance.   Sad but very true. OK, Daniels sort of tried once but we were told by a couple of councilmen they could do nothing about MCCD - IE Kim Scott.

Without changing the script at MCCD, Springfield and it's sister communities will have a tough time getting to much further ahead with the abandoned house/ rolling fine  issue. In fact, MCCD seems intent upon making the issues worse rather than better.

And what  works for Springfield will certainly work for the areas surrounding it.  In fact, the 26 million from NSP1 ( as one example) was supposed to address those issues in the areas surrounding Springfield, as well as Springfield itself. Can't you see the difference it made?  (Neither can I).  That's the other thing that needs changed.  How those millions of federal dollars are spent - they need to be positive things, not tear down historic buildings or fund over priced developments.  The decisions need to be moved to the people rather than the developers themselves. EPIC seemed like a move in the right direction, but has stalled badly with little hope of being properly moved forward.

The best thing is the parks.  Next we need fixed rail and the development and increased need for density it will bring. Until then, I doubt we will see any real progress other then what we are seeing today.  A great group of spirited and often younger people coming into Springfield on a daily basis.

Tony B

February 03, 2014, 07:41:43 PM
I'm assuming you're talking about consumer retail, restaurant and entertainment type businesses (B2C) and excluding professional and business services (B2B) type businesses? There are a number of location independent professional services type and at least a couple of manufacturing business that seem to be doing well; engineering, advertising & internet, PR, accounting, manufacturing (Allied Plastics makes furniture?) etc.  that are doing very well in Springfield.

SPAR - why did we pick Springfield vs Beaver st. or some other part of town that has equally cool old exposed brick architecture? Simple - Springfield residents are commonly organized around the goal of making this a better place to live and work.  It's a strong tight community and SPAR plays (in my opinion) a positive organizing role.

Bury the past and embrace the future.


While there are businesses surviving off main street, they arent really wildly successful, and they wont be until Main Street is revived.  Hopefully SPAR has moved beyond trying to block business openings, threatening litigation against new business owners, boycotts and outright lobbying for demolitions.

ChriswUfGator

February 03, 2014, 08:33:48 PM
I'm assuming you're talking about consumer retail, restaurant and entertainment type businesses (B2C) and excluding professional and business services (B2B) type businesses? There are a number of location independent professional services type and at least a couple of manufacturing business that seem to be doing well; engineering, advertising & internet, PR, accounting, manufacturing (Allied Plastics makes furniture?) etc.  that are doing very well in Springfield.

SPAR - why did we pick Springfield vs Beaver st. or some other part of town that has equally cool old exposed brick architecture? Simple - Springfield residents are commonly organized around the goal of making this a better place to live and work.  It's a strong tight community and SPAR plays (in my opinion) a positive organizing role.

Bury the past and embrace the future.


While there are businesses surviving off main street, they arent really wildly successful, and they wont be until Main Street is revived.  Hopefully SPAR has moved beyond trying to block business openings, threatening litigation against new business owners, boycotts and outright lobbying for demolitions.

It would be easier to forget SPAR's role in the past if we didn't have 500 vacant lots to look at. Just sayin...

Tony B

February 03, 2014, 10:18:03 PM
I'm assuming you're talking about consumer retail, restaurant and entertainment type businesses (B2C) and excluding professional and business services (B2B) type businesses? There are a number of location independent professional services type and at least a couple of manufacturing business that seem to be doing well; engineering, advertising & internet, PR, accounting, manufacturing (Allied Plastics makes furniture?) etc.  that are doing very well in Springfield.

SPAR - why did we pick Springfield vs Beaver st. or some other part of town that has equally cool old exposed brick architecture? Simple - Springfield residents are commonly organized around the goal of making this a better place to live and work.  It's a strong tight community and SPAR plays (in my opinion) a positive organizing role.

Bury the past and embrace the future.


While there are businesses surviving off main street, they arent really wildly successful, and they wont be until Main Street is revived.  Hopefully SPAR has moved beyond trying to block business openings, threatening litigation against new business owners, boycotts and outright lobbying for demolitions.

It would be easier to forget SPAR's role in the past if we didn't have 500 vacant lots to look at. Just sayin...

Aren't the people responsible for that completely out of the picture?

Tony B

February 03, 2014, 10:55:29 PM
I'm assuming you're talking about consumer retail, restaurant and entertainment type businesses (B2C) and excluding professional and business services (B2B) type businesses? There are a number of location independent professional services type and at least a couple of manufacturing business that seem to be doing well; engineering, advertising & internet, PR, accounting, manufacturing (Allied Plastics makes furniture?) etc.  that are doing very well in Springfield.

SPAR - why did we pick Springfield vs Beaver st. or some other part of town that has equally cool old exposed brick architecture? Simple - Springfield residents are commonly organized around the goal of making this a better place to live and work.  It's a strong tight community and SPAR plays (in my opinion) a positive organizing role.

Bury the past and embrace the future.


While there are businesses surviving off main street, they arent really wildly successful, and they wont be until Main Street is revived.  Hopefully SPAR has moved beyond trying to block business openings, threatening litigation against new business owners, boycotts and outright lobbying for demolitions.

It would be easier to forget SPAR's role in the past if we didn't have 500 vacant lots to look at. Just sayin...

Aren't the people responsible for that completely out of the picture?

No. In fact they handed the camera over to one.

I have no idea what that means.

ChriswUfGator

February 03, 2014, 10:57:33 PM
I'm assuming you're talking about consumer retail, restaurant and entertainment type businesses (B2C) and excluding professional and business services (B2B) type businesses? There are a number of location independent professional services type and at least a couple of manufacturing business that seem to be doing well; engineering, advertising & internet, PR, accounting, manufacturing (Allied Plastics makes furniture?) etc.  that are doing very well in Springfield.

SPAR - why did we pick Springfield vs Beaver st. or some other part of town that has equally cool old exposed brick architecture? Simple - Springfield residents are commonly organized around the goal of making this a better place to live and work.  It's a strong tight community and SPAR plays (in my opinion) a positive organizing role.

Bury the past and embrace the future.


While there are businesses surviving off main street, they arent really wildly successful, and they wont be until Main Street is revived.  Hopefully SPAR has moved beyond trying to block business openings, threatening litigation against new business owners, boycotts and outright lobbying for demolitions.

It would be easier to forget SPAR's role in the past if we didn't have 500 vacant lots to look at. Just sayin...

Aren't the people responsible for that completely out of the picture?

No. In fact they handed the camera over to one.

I have no idea what that means.

You asked whether the people were out of the picture...I was going with the camera allegory.

iloveionia

February 03, 2014, 11:36:45 PM
Much of the past continues to infect the present.

So the players who are predominantly gone, yes a few remain, left their legacy with city peeps, policy, and practices. The lack of preservation, care, concern, and an adherence to improving the community with funds and safety practices is and has been marred.

Some things can't be undone.

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

February 04, 2014, 02:38:04 PM
"Quote from: stephendare on Yesterday at 02:53:19 PM
While there are businesses surviving off main street, they arent really wildly successful, and they wont be until Main Street is revived.  Hopefully SPAR has moved beyond trying to block business openings, threatening litigation against new business owners, boycotts and outright lobbying for demolitions"

This sounds like a disgrace.  Could you please provide a future article upon for of these detais from SPAR? 

Perhaps also have SPAR give their interpriation of the issues. 

Maybe you've done this already, I just missed. Sorry.

Tacachale

February 04, 2014, 04:01:23 PM
I've always found it surprising that there hasn't been more focus on revitalizing Main Street in Springfield. It's easily the most visible area of the neighborhood and the main commercial district, the closest there is to a town center. Having great businesses outside the strip is nice, and power to the people who make it happen, but it's never going to have the impact of a revitalized business district.

Other local neighborhoods have made the commercial districts a major part of their redevelopment plans. The Beaches have had great success with this, and they're not exactly known for planning or historic preservation. In San Marco, revitalizing San Marco Square has been one of SMPS's goals since it was founded. They're proactive in encouraging and supporting business that open in San Marco and speaking to them about the kind of things they want to do and projects they'd like to see. As a result there's now a good core of business that spark further vibrancy - organizing their own events and taking the lead on the Balis Park reconstruction, for example.

Clearly Main Street is different than many of those districts, being like 20 blocks along a major arterial running into other neighborhoods, but every district will have its own particulars and challenges. And incremental improvements are still improvements.

BoldBoyOfTheSouth

February 04, 2014, 04:12:54 PM
Main Street in Springfield is like Edgewood Avenue South in Murray Hill.  The surrounding residential neighborhoods shows vibrancy, however, the main drags really, dare I say, drag down the neighborhoods.

People just driving through will keep on driving if the main thoroughfares look forlorn or not much vibrancy.

I wonder how much of the problem comes from just a handfull of commercial slum lords who could care less about the properties and just waiting for the day they can sell it at a huge profit. Until then, they just allow their building to deteriorate and make the neighborhoods looks like run down slums.

Tony B

February 04, 2014, 06:27:07 PM
Personally I think doing something positive on E. 8th st. would do more good than Main st.  Main st. is under utilized but doesn't seem like too much of a drag.  E. 8th is nasty. Litter. Run down buildings. Unsavory characters milling about. Open air drug sales.  Drive a little North or South of E. 8th and it's back to Springfield business as usual.

I've always found it surprising that there hasn't been more focus on revitalizing Main Street in Springfield. It's easily the most visible area of the neighborhood and the main commercial district, the closest there is to a town center. Having great businesses outside the strip is nice, and power to the people who make it happen, but it's never going to have the impact of a revitalized business district.

Tacachale

February 05, 2014, 04:43:28 PM
^Perhaps, though Main Street is more visible. In any event I think it's really more an issue of being progressive about revitalizing the main commercial areas in addition to the residential areas, but for whatever reason there hasn't been much emphasis on that.

strider

February 05, 2014, 05:35:27 PM
What we see on Main Street today is indeed a direct result of very poor past practices.  Rental agents given incorrect info on who could and could not rent on Main street.  The overlay often incorrectly quoted to try to insure businesses were the type the so called leadership wanted.  Favors doled out to a chosen few while Code Enforcement called on others.  Many back room deals to insure a chosen developer could eventually get property cheap and every possible road block put up in front of the other property owners so they couldn't move forward if they wanted too. 

This from personal experience.  Some landlords not wanting to even talk to you if they found out you were from Springfield.  Agents telling us what the overlay said and being shocked when I proven it was wrong.  Opening a nice, clean store on Main Street and SPAR Council's "marketing person" dissing us publicly on MetroJacksonville.  Calling MCCD at any little thing.  Leaving us out of Main Street functions unless we forced ourselves in by proving what they were or were not doing. 

Yes,  most of the major players from back then are gone, but the legacy they left behind isn't.  I believe that their methods and polices set Springfield back a good ten years. And Springfield does still have to be careful.  There are indeed a few of the old guard left and they haven't changed their true stripes.  It is up to the new blood to make the needed changes and that new blood I see coming in is what gives me hope.

GreyScale

February 07, 2014, 10:44:26 PM
My only concern is how the city will address the rough neighborhoods that create a horseshoe around the Springfield area.  If an individual travels to far East they’ll be greeted by the juvenile detention center, massive industrial buildings (some viable business, some rotting shells), and what is predominately a drug and gang infested area; North is much of the same; West (Northwest), passing under I95 is a continuation of the familiar trends.  In my opinion addressing the East and North banks that surround the Springfield district would be the best as the West is somewhat separated by the interstate.  Maybe this isn’t a huge concern for some, but something to consider nevertheless.

meh.  this kind of thinking doesnt ever really do anything.

Change occurs when the good things are more attractive than the bad things.

You should have seen what Manhattan was surrounded by a few years ago.

Welcome to the forums btw.



My only concern is how the city will address the rough neighborhoods that create a horseshoe around the Springfield area.  If an individual travels to far East they’ll be greeted by the juvenile detention center, massive industrial buildings (some viable business, some rotting shells), and what is predominately a drug and gang infested area; North is much of the same; West (Northwest), passing under I95 is a continuation of the familiar trends.  In my opinion addressing the East and North banks that surround the Springfield district would be the best as the West is somewhat separated by the interstate.  Maybe this isn’t a huge concern for some, but something to consider nevertheless.

meh.  this kind of thinking doesnt ever really do anything.

Change occurs when the good things are more attractive than the bad things.

You should have seen what Manhattan was surrounded by a few years ago.

Welcome to the forums btw.


Once more these are merely my reservations; not to be misconstrued as mode of thinking as it relates to the area.  It is my belief that the Springfield area could very well serve as one of the premiere locations in Jacksonville. It has rich military, social, and cultural history; not to mention streets such as Silver that play host to some of the most dynamic renovations and new builds in the city.  I've eyed the area for years in debate..."Can my business be the catalyst for change?"  Will the opportunity be missed if I don't act now?  Springfield at the moment is a game of chance in my opinion.  Unfortunately, most new start ups can't afford the risk, and big businesses aren't willing to play.

MacMaddies

February 07, 2014, 11:37:28 PM
I agree that Main St. is a little less unattractive than 8th, but I think both need to be the focus as the two main thoroughfares in SPR.  As a resident, especially one that lives less than a block from Main St., I am always hoping and praying that something will be the "catalyst", as Grey said, to begin the change.  Uptown Market and 3 Layers (although not on Main or 8th) can not do it alone.  My wife and I recently started our online business and in our dreams, hope to one day have a brick and mortar storefront.  In our conversations, we often say "I would love to have our store in the neighborhood, but I don't know that it would be successful here.  It should probably be in [insert one of the other urban core neighborhoods here]".  Unfortunately that is probably the rationale of many new local businesses.  Although rent might be cheaper in Springfield than Riverside, Avondale, or San Marco, your ultimate goal is to be successful.  There needs to be something in the neighborhood that makes Springfield a destination that other businesses can build and grow around.  We'll see what happens in 2014...maybe some of the hopeful plans will actually come to fruition.

IrvAdams

February 08, 2014, 08:17:58 AM
When I was growing up in the 60s and 70s that area between 7th and 8th was a destination for lunch or shopping. There was a large Pic N' Save store on East 8th at the time, and a popular drugstore, diner, etc. along that strip. The buildings are beautiful period structures if they are cleaned up and can be useful again. Within the last ten years  we used to attend a Writing class that was held in a storefront down there, then the tenant moved briefly DT, not sure where they went from there.

Good luck with your business! I think this area (needs a name, maybe the near-Northside?) will rise to luster again.

thelakelander

February 08, 2014, 11:32:05 AM
^Perhaps, though Main Street is more visible. In any event I think it's really more an issue of being progressive about revitalizing the main commercial areas in addition to the residential areas, but for whatever reason there hasn't been much emphasis on that.

I've always thought Main and 8th should be their own TIF districts. In Chicago, the model has been great for the revitalization of similar inner city commercial corridors.

mtraininjax

February 10, 2014, 03:43:44 PM
What is the unemployment rate along Main Street as compared to 8th Street? I just drove through Springfield looking at investment property, I saw a lot of adults and kids hanging out, nothing to do, playing hoops in the street. You don't see that in other neighborhoods. Of course you also don't see a lot of $15,000 houses in other neighborhoods either.

I do believe all these people being out shows there is a need for more training, more jobs and more opportunities in this area. Would MM or Intuition or Bold City look to relocate here and help put these people to work? A rising tide will lift the boats of all the people in the area. City should be doing more to encourage more jobs in these areas, plus isn't 32206 connected to 32202?

strider

February 10, 2014, 07:19:27 PM
The best scenario, in my opinion, would be to do street car up main.  The resulting development would bring work and if done right, not displace everyone below the average income levels.

By the way, most of the federal dollars coming into Jacksonville do so due to area codes like 33306 and 32202 and the state they are in.  Those millions upon millions of federal dollars have done lots of good ........OK, some good.  Just think how much more good could have been done if the dollars were actually handled properly.

I have a dream of where Intuition could be and I think it is a marvelous plan, but it isn't my money, business nor property so what do I know.
View forum thread
Welcome Guest. You must be logged in to comment on this story.

What are the benefits of having a MetroJacksonville.com account?
  • Share your opinion by posting comments on stories that interest you.
  • Stay up to date on all of the latest issues affecting your neighborhood.
  • Create a network of friends working towards a better Jacksonville.
Register now
Already have an account? Login now to comment.