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10 Neighborhoods That Tourist Haven't Discovered

According to Libby McMillan from 10Best.com, here are ten notable up & coming urban neighborhoods across the country that still remain secrets to the outside world.

Published June 7, 2013 in Learning From      6 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article



Chicago's Wicker Park



Most are familiar with the Loop but Wicker Park may be the most trendiest urban neighborhood in the city.



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6 Comments

JeffreyS

June 07, 2013, 08:03:49 AM
Wicker park is fantastic. It seems to be crowded all the time though so I don't know about the undiscovered label.

Bativac

June 07, 2013, 10:56:54 AM
I second the comment about Wicker Park. Wife and I visited Chicago last December and spent lots of time in Wicker Park but I wouldn't call it "undiscovered"...

simms3

June 07, 2013, 01:38:06 PM
As a viewer of this forum, just food for thought but this didn't have to be on 10 separate pages.  Much more viewer friendly to see 10 pictures on one page than 10 pictures on 10 pages.

Anyway - Wicker Park seems pretty crowded to me (and it's basically right near Logan Square, Bucktown, and Lincoln Park, all very desirable neighborhoods right now along with Wicker Park)...I'd say the area was "discovered" a while ago!  Same goes for Valencia St in SF, maybe not all the way down at 22nd where the Google streetview was taken, but Valencia is the hottest restaurant scene du jour in one of the world's hottest restaurant cities, so yea - it's crowded.  Both neighborhoods are served by rail and are within short cab ride of the hotels, so they're pretty accessible to those tourists looking to venture out, but both are still local scenes mostly (as any area outside of a "downtown" area would be).

East Nashville is one to ponder.  I've never been, but have a foodie friend who grew up down the street from me in Jax and went to Vandy, now lives in Nashville, and she talks about going there to eat as if that's "the place" in Nashville.  I've never crossed the river there (from a tourist's perspective, it does not look like there is anything there beyond the stadium...and I doubt it makes Frommer's highlights right now, LoL).  I did read an article about East Nashville within the past 5 months in airline mag, so it can't be "that" undiscovered anymore.

Also Seaport District in Boston has a convention center, and tons of touristy lobster shacks with live music (I know this because I make it a point to eat there when I'm there for work).

Edit: just found this article.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2012/08/03/seven-new-hotels-approved-for-seaport-district/bFbquBLqxuBNxbCMeQpo9I/story.html

Looks like Seaport is going to be home to many new large CC hotels, up to 2,700 rooms.  My own company just made a large $150MM++ investment in the area.  It's HOT.  It's one of the only developable areas in the city (sort of like a hotter, closer to FiDi version of Mission Bay in SF).

Demosthenes

June 07, 2013, 03:54:44 PM
I enjoyed Roosevelt Row, or rather, what is left of it. Phoenix tore much of it down in the name of urban renewal. What is left is a couple of handfuls of awesome old bungelows. I would love to have seen it before much of it was leveled.

I think that South Slope and Greenpointe in Brooklyn are both noteworthy. Greenpointe may be too far along to be included in the list, but South Slope, which is between Park Slope and Sunset Park has a nice mix of housing, retail and renewal, but still has a little grit.

vicupstate

June 07, 2013, 09:41:39 PM
Quote
East Nashville is one to ponder.  I've never been, but have a foodie friend who grew up down the street from me in Jax and went to Vandy, now lives in Nashville, and she talks about going there to eat as if that's "the place" in Nashville.  I've never crossed the river there (from a tourist's perspective, it does not look like there is anything there beyond the stadium...and I doubt it makes Frommer's highlights right now, LoL).  I did read an article about East Nashville within the past 5 months in airline mag, so it can't be "that" undiscovered anymore.

Lake, sounds like a good segway to use those East Nashville pictures I sent you last year.

Simms3, next time take a trip across the river.  There is a mile or so of blandness but then you reach Five Points and the other urban environs.  It is hip and vibrant and mixes the historic housing stock ( similiar to Springfield)with modern contemporary mixed use projects.  Like the city as a whole, it has a charm and personality all it's  own.   

peestandingup

June 08, 2013, 04:03:26 PM
10 pages, guys? Seriously, I know you're trying to increase click thrus/ad views (and there's nothing wrong with that), but Jesus Christ. Try to maintain a sense of usability too please.
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