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Above Jacksonville's Southside

Given the opportunity to participate in a recent missionary trip flight out of Craig Airport, Metro Jacksonville's Ennis Davis shares views of Jacksonville's Southside and a few other places from 3,000 feet above.

Published November 8, 2012 in Neighborhoods      23 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article



19.

Lake Apopka is the third largest lake in Florida. Fed by a natural spring, rainfall and stormwater runoff, water from Lake Apopka flows through the Apopka-Beauclair Canal and into Lakes Beauclair and Dora. From Lake Dora, water flows into Lake Eustis, then into Lake Griffin and then northward into the Ocklawaha River, which flows into the St. Johns River.

20.

In Apopka, construction is underway on the extension of the John Land Apopka Expressway and the Daniel Webster Western Beltway.  This project will tie into the controversial Wekiva Parkway project, forming a beltway around Orlando.

21.

Landing at Orlando Apopka Airport.

22.

St. Augustine in the distance.

23.

World Golf Village.

24.

Midway between Jacksonville and St. Augustine, World Golf Village is a 6,300 acre community envisioned to eventually have 18,000 residents.  It is also home to the World Golf Hall of Fame, which is intended to be the ultimate golf destination for players and fans of the game.


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23 Comments

Adam W

November 08, 2012, 03:51:46 AM
Great pics, Ennis. It must've been amazing having the opportunity to see the city and the State from that perspective.

Re the Tamaya development: has permission been granted for them to not build the roadway, or is the decision pending?

Out of curiosity, do you know when they renamed the airport to "Jacksonville Executive at Craig Airport?"

Noone

November 08, 2012, 05:02:34 AM
Nice pics. Happen to see any manatees from the air?

Charles Hunter

November 08, 2012, 06:34:56 AM
I think the airport renaming took place within the last year.  The Aviation Authority wanted to name it "Jacksonville Executive Airport", without any mention of "Craig."  They added "at Craig Airport" back after lots of community opposition to snubbing him.

thelakelander

November 08, 2012, 07:07:30 AM
Great pics, Ennis. It must've been amazing having the opportunity to see the city and the State from that perspective.

It was a pretty nice perspective.  On that particular day, it was kind of hazy but some of the most interesting scenery is came paralleling the St. Johns River to Central Florida.


Tick Island and Lake Woodruff near DeLeon Springs.


Bear Island in Crescent Lake and Crescent City.

Nice pics. Happen to see any manatees from the air?

Not at 2,500 and 6,500 feet high.  However, did see a few power plants.  Here's the coal plant near Palatka.

Charles Hunter

November 08, 2012, 07:14:39 AM
Nice pics.
mmmm "Tick Island" - sounds like a great place to ... avoid

Adam W

November 08, 2012, 07:43:37 AM
I think the airport renaming took place within the last year.  The Aviation Authority wanted to name it "Jacksonville Executive Airport", without any mention of "Craig."  They added "at Craig Airport" back after lots of community opposition to snubbing him.

Thanks. It's an awkward-sounding name. I grew near there and probably will always think of it as Craig Airport, so I guess I can appreciate local opposition to the removal of the name.

Lunican

November 08, 2012, 09:04:02 AM
Quote
$200 million has been invested in the community's roadway network in order to facilitate its long term growth.  Today, nearly 1,000 people call Nocatee home.

Anyone still wondering if sprawl is affordable?

Ocklawaha

November 08, 2012, 11:32:28 AM
Actually 1,000 people is incorrect for Nocatee, it should read 1,000 families.

Quote
"We are thrilled with Nocatee's momentum and growth," said Richard T. Ray, Managing Partner with the PARC Group.  "Achieving the milestone of 1,000 families speaks to the consumer confidence in the community and the builder product offered in our seven neighborhoods. Nocatee's success is in large part due to our builders and industry partners' perseverance and expertise."

Non-RedNeck Westsider

November 08, 2012, 11:58:18 AM
Let's keep the families out of Nocatee....

The well maintained, hardly used, curvy 2 laned highways make for a nice racetrack for both sportbikes and sportscars.

I don't think I'd feel safe at 140mph if I though Doris and her SoccerMom SUV might pull out at any moment.

thelakelander

November 08, 2012, 11:58:38 AM
For further clarification on Nocatee's 2010 census population was 1,200 residents living on 23.48 square miles.  At the time, according to Nocatee's website, they had around 500 families. With 1,000 families that would put them in the range of 2,400 to 3,000 residents or so.

Quote
"Our builders are very pleased with the activity so far in 2010," Ray said this week.

Currently, about 500 families, or 1,500 people, live in Nocatee.

http://www.nocatee.com/news/nocatee-news/2010/08/19/st-johns-adds-more-school-buses-for-growing-nocatee.aspx

Overall, it has a long term buildout for a population of 30,000 over 23.48 square miles of land area.  That should eventually give it a buildout density somewhere around 1,278 residents per square mile.  Of interesting note, Lunican's Lakeview neighborhood in Chicago, has 94,368 residents living within a 3.16 square mile area.  That's a population density of 29,863 residents per square mile.

cline

November 08, 2012, 01:47:36 PM
Quote
For further clarification on Nocatee's 2010 census population was 1,200 residents living on 23.48 square miles.  At the time, according to Nocatee's website, they had around 500 families. With 1,000 families that would put them in the range of 2,400 to 3,000 residents or so.

Man they're really killin' it now with 3k people.  I guess Nocatee Parkway and the overpasses PARC built are really paying off.

fsquid

November 08, 2012, 01:59:07 PM
Quote
For further clarification on Nocatee's 2010 census population was 1,200 residents living on 23.48 square miles.  At the time, according to Nocatee's website, they had around 500 families. With 1,000 families that would put them in the range of 2,400 to 3,000 residents or so.

Man they're really killin' it now with 3k people.  I guess Nocatee Parkway and the overpasses PARC built are really paying off.

helps me get to the beach quicker.

tufsu1

November 08, 2012, 10:28:27 PM
well ok then...guess the exppressway is worth it

spuwho

November 08, 2012, 11:38:55 PM
Some responses of the view of Southside from up high....

While I know you were contrasting the cost of the BJP as comparing some kind of transit options.....

- Atlantic & Kernan was an intersection of death for many years...it was #1 in Jax for accidents prior to the bridge. This intersection had to be remediated, no transit option was going to fix the issues.
- Beach & Kernan bridge...IMHO, this bridge has some very fascinating engineering going on. It was designed to have pitch, bow and also was built as a turn. It has no center piece holding it up. It was also built in a hurry because FDOT was in the middle of rehabbing US90 and JTA/FDOT didn't want to have to tear up Beach again when the bridge got built. JTA took some licks for that decision in their audit of BJP.
- Also remember that the Atlantic/Kernan and the Beach/Kernan updates facilitate improved hurricane evacuations. Now with 4 major E/W routes with the draw bridges removed. No transit option can replace that in the event of natural disaster.

Lake, if you look a little closer at Kernan, they did build out a very pedestrian friendly bicycle/running paved trail from Atlantic all the way to UNF. Driving down it shows it is used very heavily especially between Beach and JTB by the UNF students.  It is easily overlooked. The only miss is that the bridge wasn't built to include it, you have run the gauntlet of lights at Beach to get across.

JTA purposely added 2 left turn bays on Kernan at Alden for the future Tamaya 4 lane connector to Hodges. They shouldn't let them off the hook, that connector would have been a small but useful reliever of local traffic using Beach to reach Hodges.

Your pictures also clearly show where the BJP ran out of money. Kernan goes from 6 lanes going north to only 2 lanes between Atlantic and Wonderwood. This causes extreme backups in the AM/PM rush as there are several schools (Landmark, Sabal Palm & Waterleaf) in that 2 lane stretch.

Another miss on the Kernan BJP southside expansion, they purposely left out a bridged school crossing in support of Kernan Trail/Middle School. After 2 years of 60+ mph, they placed 15MPH warnings now which defeats the purpose of a 6 lane Kernan to begin with. Finally, the landscaping JTA required has been left to its own survival. After a month of watering, they stopped and now one by one the trees they planted are dying.

Where should future transit go to support the Southside?

With so many places that could support permanent transit options (meaning non-bus)
- FSCJ
-UNF
-SJTC
- Beaches
-Deerwood Park
-Avenues District
- Future Cruise Terminal

I am impressed that you actually checked the density levels in the Baymeadows area. Keep it up, I am certain you will find that not all developments in the Southside are not all that country clubbish in density. Some are, many aren't.

Of final note, there are no McDonalds, Burger Kings or Chik Fil A's in the Kernan Southside corridor.  But yes, Mr. Sleiman does own 3 corners at Atlantic and 1 at Beach.



thelakelander

November 09, 2012, 07:05:22 AM
Quote
Where should future transit go to support the Southside?

It's not in our long term plans but when I look at the Southside, JTB stands out as the most logical core for future fixed transit.  Although is not geographically centered, it has the type of destinations already existing that supports mass transit. In essence, it reminds me of San Diego's Mission Valley corridor that is served by the Trolley's (LRT) Green Line. 














Looking at the JTB corridor, heading from west to east, you have a nice chain of major destinations and you penetrate Jacksonville's Edge City.

Southpoint, St. Lukes, multifamily housing, Deerwood Park, Southside Public Library, SJTC, UNF, Mayo Clinic, etc. with Jax Beach being an ending destination.  However, the major problem here, and anywhere else between DT and the Beaches, is the cost.  You're going to have to spend between $1-$2 billion building something.

Quote
- Atlantic & Kernan was an intersection of death for many years...it was #1 in Jax for accidents prior to the bridge. This intersection had to be remediated, no transit option was going to fix the issues.

My point wasn't to say improvements to the Kernan corridor were not needed.  My point was to highlight how much these improvements tend to cost on an average because we do these types of improvements all over the city.  Sometimes we push off mass transit talk based on an idea that its too expensive and will never pay for itself.  However, we turn a blind eye when it comes to more expensive roadway construction which really never pays for itself.

blfair

November 09, 2012, 08:56:11 AM
Thanks. It's an awkward-sounding name. I grew near there and probably will always think of it as Craig Airport, so I guess I can appreciate local opposition to the removal of the name.

It is awkward. I think the only place you see it called that is in JAA marketing materials. They think calling Craig 'Jacksonville Executive' (more often JAXEX, even better!) and Herlong 'Herlong Recreational' will somehow make all of the Sunday pilots leave Craig I guess?

After the 'rebranding', some folks decided to call Craig on the radio, and rather than saying 'Craig tower, piper n1234', they said 'Jacksonville executive airport at Craig field tower, piper n1234'. The controllers were not amused and informed that it was still just 'Craig'!

spuwho

November 09, 2012, 08:05:44 PM
Lake,

No issues here as I knew what you were contrasting in your write up.

Good transit planning has benefits that should last from 100-150 years, While roads have some similar benefits, the fact they have to be replaced every 30-40 years can actually make them more expensive in the long term.

A 1 Billion USD investment for a Jax to Beach fixed transit system seems like a lot up front, but measured over its useful life compared to modern highways and bridges would be an interesting study. The measurement of Per Person BTU's consumed annually over the amount of depreciated capital of each method should provide a ballpark feel for the efficiency and cost effectiveness.

ronchamblin

November 09, 2012, 08:18:06 PM
Interesting pic's Lake.  I wish the smog or haze wasn't obscuring the details. I wonder if there is such a thing as a haze filter.  Seems like I remember on the old types of cameras, when you could put a filter on to eliminate some kinds of colors etc.  I'm not a camera person.  Anybody have any ideas about a filter that might work on a digital?

 

thelakelander

November 09, 2012, 09:26:57 PM
I'm going to go back up on a clearer day.

Adam W

November 10, 2012, 03:20:31 AM
Interesting pic's Lake.  I wish the smog or haze wasn't obscuring the details. I wonder if there is such a thing as a haze filter.  Seems like I remember on the old types of cameras, when you could put a filter on to eliminate some kinds of colors etc.  I'm not a camera person.  Anybody have any ideas about a filter that might work on a digital?

I've always heard that UV filters helped with reducing haze. I have UV filters on all my lenses b/c they're cheap and they protect the lens. Not sure if it would make a huge difference, but it might help.

blfair

November 10, 2012, 09:32:58 AM
Looked hazy, but also like these were taken through plexiglass, which on a plane really seems to make everything dull and distorted. My experience is you can't make the result look better, just different.

I'm going to work on flying from the right seat so I can have someone take decent photos, as both planes I usually fly only have opening windows on the left.

Overstreet

November 10, 2012, 11:55:24 AM
One thing about JTB is that it is a corridor that people actually go to things on. There are business parks all along it's length from I-95 to the ICW. Then there is the beach. A lot of people move through the corridor. But Y'all would be providing transportation for the suburbanites that didn't connect to anything much less downtown.

thelakelander

November 10, 2012, 12:24:27 PM
Or you would have a DT to Beach corridor, which would blow away most starter LRT corridors in this country.
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