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Jacksonville Historical Society: Twelve Worth Saving

Metro Jacksonville shares the Jacksonville Historic Society's recently released a list of twelve significant endangered historical sites for 2012.

Published May 22, 2012 in History      31 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


feature

St. Johns River Ferry



In operation since at least 1948, the St. Johns River Ferry provides motorists a break from the traffic and saves 38 miles of driving using the alternative route to the other side.  The Ferry is endangered due to a half million or greater annual operating deficit, and the unwillingness of the State of Florida and/or the City of Jacksonville to maintain this vital transportation link.  Also a historic tourist attraction, the current vessel is named in honor of French Explorer Jean Ribault.


Haydon Burns Library
122 North Ocean Street



Built in 1965 on the site of the 1903 Jacksonville City Hall, the modern design replaced the 1905 Carnegie Library across the street. Local Architect Taylor Hardwick made a bold statement with the design of a library that served Jacksonville for forty years. The unique modern era structure could easily be adapted to a number of uses.


LaVilla “Shotgun” Houses
Intersection of N. Jefferson and W. Duval Streets



Built between 1890 and 1930, the LaVilla "Shotgun" houses are three survivors of a distinctive style stored for future restoration, yet rapidly deteriorating beyond economical repair. Working people lived in these practical one story homes in which one could shoot a shotgun straight down the long interior hallway and out the front door.


Seminole Club
400 North Hogan Street



Built in 1902-03, this was Jacksonville's oldest social club for men and the seventh oldest in the United States. Teddy Roosevelt made a campaign speech from the front porch. The privately owned, vacant building is across from Hemming Plaza, City Hall and the new U.S. Federal Courthouse.


Dr. Horace Drew Residence
Third and Silver Streets



The eclectic design of this 1909 structure borrows elements from the Tudor Revival, Queen Anne, and Spanish Colonial Revival styles. Its base is elevated more than adjacent residences, adding to the vertical projection of the multi-planed roofline, gables, and three-story tower. The composition is enriched by harmonious colors found in the gables with half-timbering over stucco, the clay tile roof, and concrete walls.


Annie Lytle School-Public School #4
1011 Peninsular Place



Built in 1917 at a cost of over $ 250,000 and originally known as Public School Number Four, it was renamed Annie Lytle School in honor of its former principal. Architect Rutledge Holmes designed a Neo-Classic portico that is now seen daily by motorists passing by on the three levels of the new I-10/I-95 Interchange.
     
Vandals frequently trespass inside the structure; drawn by rumors the building is haunted. They spray graffiti, and contribute to the deterioration of the building. The building remains structurally sound, and could be put to a number of uses.


Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank
101 East Bay Street



An excellent example of early twentieth-century bank architecture, the Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank incorporates the use of classical style to convey a sense of security and prosperity. The 1902 structure was skillfully doubled in size in 1919. The pressed grey Roman brick structure features limestone trim and finely detailed arches.
     
Known in recent years for its jaguar themed boarded-up windows, it points the way to Jacksonville Municipal Stadium on game day. A collapsed roof has led to significant water damage to the structure. A demolition permit for the structure is allegedly being sought.



Ford Motor Company Assembly Plant
Wambolt Street at the St. Johns River



One of over 1,000 buildings designed for Henry Ford by Albert Kahn (no relation to Jaguars owner Shahid Kahn) , an internationally recognized industrial architect. The building may be seen when driving westbound over the Mathews Bridge and looking east near the north end of the bridge. The 200 foot wide by 800 foot long building was an assembly plant for Model-T Fords. In its heyday Ford employed 800 people at the plant, and built 200 cars per day.



Atlantic Coast Line Locomotive #1504
1100 Block of West Bay Street



This P-5 design, 4-6-2 wheel arrangement coal-burning steam engine was built by the American Locomotive Company in Richmond, Virginia. It spent most of its working life pulling passenger trains between Richmond and Jacksonville, and was capable of speeds of nearly eighty miles per hour. Retired in 1952, it has been on display outdoors for fifty years.
     
Designated in 1990 as a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark, the engine survives in its original condition. Last refurbished in 1989, Number #1504 is rapidly deteriorating and should be restored and displayed indoors.



Barnett National Bank Building
112 West Adams Street



The design of the 1926 Barnett National Bank reflects the eclectic influences of commercial architectural styles of the 1920’s. At Eighteen stories, it remained the tallest building in Jacksonville for over 28 years.      A failed attempt at renovation has further damaged this historic building.



The Laure Street Trio

Bisbee Building
47 West Forsyth Street



Built in 1909, this ten-story reinforced concrete building was designed by H.J. Klutho. The Bisbee Building is an excellent example of the high-rise architectural concepts that were pioneered in Chicago. Jacksonville’s first “skyscraper” faces an uncertain future.



Florida Life Building
117 North Laura Street



This narrow eleven-story tower built in 1912 was and is Jacksonville’s purest expression of a “skyscraper”. The H.J. Klutho design featured terra-cotta ornamentation, much of it removed and in storage.  



Old Florida National Bank
51 West Forsyth Street



The entire fašade of this 1902 Neo-Classical Revival style bank building is sheathed in marble. A 1916 modification added a spectacular skylight, later covered by a dropped ceiling. A 1978 restoration restored its 1916 splendor.  Thirty years later, “the Marble Bank” is in need of attention if it is to survive long into its second century.



Fire Station #5
347 Riverside Avenue



Built to accommodate two fire wagons, five horses and 14 firemen in 1910, Station #5 served Jacksonville for nearly one hundred years. A 2003 economic incentive package to lure a “Fortune 100” company to relocate nearby included the City of Jacksonville deeding the property to this company. The City retained the right to relocate #5, but has not seen fit to do so. The building that housed generations of firefighters, and was a “working” fire station as recently as 2008, is in danger of demolition.

Source: Jacksonville Historical Society







31 Comments

Noone

May 22, 2012, 04:56:48 AM
All are important. I've got to go with the Mayport Ferry and the component to our St. Johns River our American Heritage River a Federal Initiative. With the new Public, Private, Partnership all will be saved.

cline

May 22, 2012, 08:23:39 AM
Is the Ferry technically a historic site?  I realize it has been in operation for a long time but it doesn't really seem like a historic site.

For the record though, I do support its continued operation.

PeeJayEss

May 22, 2012, 10:36:28 AM
Does the City own most of LaVilla (including those shotgun 'shacks' and the old jazz bar that restoration was attempted on)? Is there any land for sale in the area, or is it all being held?

Gravity

May 22, 2012, 11:41:50 AM
agree with everything except those shotgun houses?

what would that possibly do for that particular area of town?

aclchampion

May 22, 2012, 11:54:58 AM
Yes the city owns both properties where the shotgun houses are and the old jazz bar. But the location is N Jefferson and W Church, not N Jefferson and W Duval. One block north. And the old jazz bar is on W Ashley St.

Riversideist

May 22, 2012, 12:24:59 PM
Is there a reason that this is pretty much the same exact text as the T-U slideshow?
http://jacksonville.com/slideshows/slides-news/12-historic-jacksonville-sites-danger#slide=15

stephendare

May 22, 2012, 12:27:15 PM
Is there a reason that this is pretty much the same exact text as the T-U slideshow?
http://jacksonville.com/slideshows/slides-news/12-historic-jacksonville-sites-danger#slide=15

Probably because the Historical Society (on whose board Ennis sits) issues the same list to the other media as well, and does them the courtesy of providing photos for easy reference.

Timkin

May 22, 2012, 11:06:29 PM
All are important. I've got to go with the Mayport Ferry and the component to our St. Johns River our American Heritage River a Federal Initiative. With the new Public, Private, Partnership all will be saved.

I don't know about that.... The Shotgun Houses are in pretty bad shape currently, and while they might be the least expensive to repair, there are other examples of Shotgun Houses... So I doubt they get saved. 

Was surprised Genovar's was not on the list. Here again ..  a shell after tons of money, squandered that could well have gone a long ways towards saving it.

Locomotive #1504... That is just plain and simply ridiculous ... At least build a shelter over the thing to keep it from becoming a pile of rust.

The Ferry has probably a better chance than some of the buildings.


I love all of these buildings , including Annie Lytle , but it would be a tough call to prioritize which should be spared first and consecutively to last. As far as building condition , I would think the Haydon Burns Library building would still be in decent condition, structurally speaking.

If Annie Lytle has any advantage , it is that there is very little left in the structure that can be burned.  Its interior condition is a moot point because it would have to be gutted to be retrofitted and brought to modern code.  It has really thick brick walls . Presumably it would be tough for vandals to compromise those.  Guess I should not say anything as the building has been doomed for the last 40 years and more damage done by vandalism , than neglect.

In short  I do hope a way is paved to save most , if not all of these places, but it looks pretty bleak.

Ocklawaha

May 22, 2012, 11:47:43 PM
Again, I would add the grand old 'Jacksonville Terminal' to the list as JTA has designs to butcher the lines of the original 1919 station and add a concrete 'wart' on the south wing to accommodate Amtrak as a new downtown train station. ABSOLUTELY INSANITY as the original building is more then capable of taking care of all of our surface transportation needs with JTA having to spend a dime on a brick to build 'another' station in LaVilla.

OCKLAWAHA

Timkin

May 23, 2012, 12:07:11 AM
Again, I would add the grand old 'Jacksonville Terminal' to the list as JTA has designs to butcher the lines of the original 1919 station and add a concrete 'wart' on the south wing to accommodate Amtrak as a new downtown train station. ABSOLUTELY INSANITY as the original building is more then capable of taking care of all of our surface transportation needs with JTA having to spend a dime on a brick to build 'another' station in LaVilla.

OCKLAWAHA

And the tunnels.   +1

thelakelander

May 23, 2012, 12:11:46 AM
Is there a reason that this is pretty much the same exact text as the T-U slideshow?
http://jacksonville.com/slideshows/slides-news/12-historic-jacksonville-sites-danger#slide=15

Because the FTU probably posted the same press release we issued yesterday after the JHS board meeting.

thelakelander

May 23, 2012, 12:13:35 AM
Is there a reason that this is pretty much the same exact text as the T-U slideshow?
http://jacksonville.com/slideshows/slides-news/12-historic-jacksonville-sites-danger#slide=15

Probably because the Historical Society (on whose board Ennis sits) issues the same list to the other media as well, and does them the courtesy of providing photos for easy reference.

Yes, there was a press release and images burned to a disk for all media.  A few of our pictures for some of the sites are different because we had better ones already available in the MJ photo gallery.

thelakelander

May 23, 2012, 12:18:09 AM
Again, I would add the grand old 'Jacksonville Terminal' to the list as JTA has designs to butcher the lines of the original 1919 station and add a concrete 'wart' on the south wing to accommodate Amtrak as a new downtown train station. ABSOLUTELY INSANITY as the original building is more then capable of taking care of all of our surface transportation needs with JTA having to spend a dime on a brick to build 'another' station in LaVilla.

OCKLAWAHA

And the tunnels.   +1

This is one of those list that we can easily expand into the hundreds living in a demo happy city.  Jax Brewing, American Export Motor Company, Jax Terminal Subway, 801 Forsyth Street, Hogans Creek Promenade, the slaughterhouse on Beaver Street, etc. could all easily be added to an endangered list.  Half of these places mentioned could disappear without a whimper because they are in areas of town that don't get the same publicity as a Riverside, Springfield, Downtown or San Marco.

BackinJax05

May 23, 2012, 02:31:47 AM
The Haydon Burns library & the shotgun shanties could go, and I doubt anyone would miss them. I know I wouldnt. As for Taylor Hardwick's "bold statement", it probably had a little help from "flower power". That butt ugly building looks like a bad acid trip.

BackinJax05

May 23, 2012, 02:34:34 AM
Again, I would add the grand old 'Jacksonville Terminal' to the list as JTA has designs to butcher the lines of the original 1919 station and add a concrete 'wart' on the south wing to accommodate Amtrak as a new downtown train station. ABSOLUTELY INSANITY as the original building is more then capable of taking care of all of our surface transportation needs with JTA having to spend a dime on a brick to build 'another' station in LaVilla. 

OCKLAWAHA

Agreed. Knock down the convention center. All of that space could easily accommodate Amtrak, Greyhound, JTA, & Commuter rail. Yeah, like were ever gonna see commuter rail in Jacksonville in our lifetimes.

mbwright

May 23, 2012, 08:32:45 AM
Regarding the Taylor Hardwick Library, I thought it would have been great to have the modern art museum there.    Many do not like the building, but I think it is very cool, and significant for modern architecture.  From what I understand he designed all of the furniture, book racks, and such.  I wonder if any of this remains?  Yes, there are many more than just 12 that are worth saving.  Maybe one day the city will understand this.

mtraininjax

May 23, 2012, 08:51:55 AM
Some of the old furnishings from the Library on Ocean are in the 4th floor executive offices of the Main library, some of the items are priceless one of a kind, too bad no one gets to see them in the public. Many of our cities great treasures are locked away from public viewing, just like the minds of some of our so called leaders.

urbaknight

May 23, 2012, 10:57:47 AM
So the Laura st Trio and the Barnett buildings are back on the demolisher's minds? What about that huge presentation that was so full of good ideas? Did they just pull the plug or something?

If_I_Loved_you

May 30, 2012, 06:45:09 PM
Annie Lytle School-Public School #4 I find this building to be an eyesore remove it! Fire Station #5 at 347 Riverside ave has history behind it. But at it's location if the city can't move it soon tear it down. Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank 101 East Bay Street remove it! Everything else in this story has Pros and Cons but could be reused in the future.

Timkin

May 30, 2012, 10:05:58 PM
Annie Lytle School-Public School #4 I find this building to be an eyesore remove it! Fire Station #5 at 347 Riverside ave has history behind it. But at it's location if the city can't move it soon tear it down. Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank 101 East Bay Street remove it! Everything else in this story has Pros and Cons but could be reused in the future.

Don't agree and apparently, neither does the Jax Historic Society, otherwise they would not be on the list.   

If I have to make a guess.. The Laura Trio might end up being spared and the rest of the buildings razed.   Annie Lytle is no more of an "eyesore" than any other landmark sitting unused, boarded up, vandalized, etc.  The Old Claude Nolan Cadilllac Building is in juat about as bad of shape.. Doesn't mean it should be razed.   Same with the Drew Home.   None of these places SHOULD be razed.   But they probably will be , because not enough people value our historic places.    Down the Street in St Augustine, much of the downtown area is at least a century old and some of it several centuries old. Jacksonville could benefit so much from valuing and making points of interest of our historic places, as St. Augustine thrives, doing so.   

Comments such as the previous , is the mindset of those who do not get it. We have destroyed so much of our history.  We need to hang on to what ever remains.  This includes  #4 , The Bank,  CNC,  The Ford Factory, the list goes on.

Or we can raze it all and finish the job started a half century ago.   That would make Jacksonville a real piece of work.

If_I_Loved_you

May 30, 2012, 10:39:11 PM
Annie Lytle School-Public School #4 I find this building to be an eyesore remove it! Fire Station #5 at 347 Riverside ave has history behind it. But at it's location if the city can't move it soon tear it down. Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank 101 East Bay Street remove it! Everything else in this story has Pros and Cons but could be reused in the future.

Don't agree and apparently, neither does the Jax Historic Society, otherwise they would not be on the list.   

If I have to make a guess.. The Laura Trio might end up being spared and the rest of the buildings razed.   Annie Lytle is no more of an "eyesore" than any other landmark sitting unused, boarded up, vandalized, etc.  The Old Claude Nolan Cadilllac Building is in juat about as bad of shape.. Doesn't mean it should be razed.   Same with the Drew Home.   None of these places SHOULD be razed.   But they probably will be , because not enough people value our historic places.    Down the Street in St Augustine, much of the downtown area is at least a century old and some of it several centuries old. Jacksonville could benefit so much from valuing and making points of interest of our historic places, as St. Augustine thrives, doing so.   

Comments such as the previous , is the mindset of those who do not get it. We have destroyed so much of our history.  We need to hang on to what ever remains.  This includes  #4 , The Bank,  CNC,  The Ford Factory, the list goes on.

Or we can raze it all and finish the job started a half century ago.   That would make Jacksonville a real piece of work.
Would we have been better off if Jacksonville looked like it did in the 1950's? Then we could have called it Pleasantville.

Timkin

May 30, 2012, 10:41:51 PM
Annie Lytle School-Public School #4 I find this building to be an eyesore remove it! Fire Station #5 at 347 Riverside ave has history behind it. But at it's location if the city can't move it soon tear it down. Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank 101 East Bay Street remove it! Everything else in this story has Pros and Cons but could be reused in the future.

Don't agree and apparently, neither does the Jax Historic Society, otherwise they would not be on the list.   

If I have to make a guess.. The Laura Trio might end up being spared and the rest of the buildings razed.   Annie Lytle is no more of an "eyesore" than any other landmark sitting unused, boarded up, vandalized, etc.  The Old Claude Nolan Cadilllac Building is in juat about as bad of shape.. Doesn't mean it should be razed.   Same with the Drew Home.   None of these places SHOULD be razed.   But they probably will be , because not enough people value our historic places.    Down the Street in St Augustine, much of the downtown area is at least a century old and some of it several centuries old. Jacksonville could benefit so much from valuing and making points of interest of our historic places, as St. Augustine thrives, doing so.   

Comments such as the previous , is the mindset of those who do not get it. We have destroyed so much of our history.  We need to hang on to what ever remains.  This includes  #4 , The Bank,  CNC,  The Ford Factory, the list goes on.

Or we can raze it all and finish the job started a half century ago.   That would make Jacksonville a real piece of work.
Would we have been better off if Jacksonville looked like it did in the 1950's? Then we could have called it Pleasantville.

I guess we could have.  Still do not get your point?   

Debbie Thompson

May 30, 2012, 11:49:05 PM
If I Loved You, in the 1950's, Jacksonville had a vibrant, energetic downtown.  There were hotels, department stores, and lots of people working downtown. Many of the grand buildings bulldozed for urban renewal still stood then.  By now, instead of the buildings just being considered "old and tired" the way they were viewed in the 1960's during the urban renewal craze, they would have reached the designation of historic and people may be more interested in their preservation.  So I think I may be OK with Jacksonville still looking pretty much like it did in the 1950's.  I think it beats the parking lot pocked downtown we have now.

thelakelander

May 31, 2012, 12:05:50 AM
Would we have been better off if Jacksonville looked like it did in the 1950's? Then we could have called it Pleasantville.

Pleasantville or a place with the urban vibrancy of Savannah, New Orleans, Charleston, Seattle and San Francisco.  Now we have entire sections of town that rival a half abandoned rust belt city.

jamesh1977

August 21, 2012, 12:48:14 PM
I think having historical landmarks in a city is a great thing, but at what point do we draw the line. Most of these buildings are condemned and collapsing in on themselves. They are more of a hazard and an eyesore than usable property. Why is Jacksonville bent on holding on to the past. Many other cities have allowed large companies to come in and renovate historical buildings, leaving the outside intact. This keeps the historic look of the area, but brings in modern business. The look of the downtown area is so appealing when you drive through Jacksonville, but it's just a lot of empty buildings that are falling apart and a few small shops that are struggling to pull what little foot traffic in they can.

Debbie Thompson

August 21, 2012, 01:34:23 PM
Jamesh, I don't think anyone said they were against someone renovating an historic building on the inside.  I think we are saying the City doesn't do enough to save the historic buildings to begin with.  They have a "hands-off" attitude and if the owners don't fix the building, they just tear it down.  Our historic preservation ordinance holds the City responsible for preserving historic buildings. There are already ways on the books for the City to step in before a builidng is "falling apart."

Timkin

August 21, 2012, 02:17:44 PM
I think having historical landmarks in a city is a great thing, but at what point do we draw the line. Most of these buildings are condemned and collapsing in on themselves. They are more of a hazard and an eyesore than usable property. Why is Jacksonville bent on holding on to the past. Many other cities have allowed large companies to come in and renovate historical buildings, leaving the outside intact. This keeps the historic look of the area, but brings in modern business. The look of the downtown area is so appealing when you drive through Jacksonville, but it's just a lot of empty buildings that are falling apart and a few small shops that are struggling to pull what little foot traffic in they can.

You are way off on your first statement.  You COULDN'T think that having historic buildings is a great thing ,otherwise you wouldn't be among the masses who have no value, no respect , no consideration whatsoever for the VERY VERY few historic buildings that remain.  The line you are speaking of , doesn't exist and this is practiced more often than you think ,  Less than a week ago a century old building , not even in that bad of shape was razed.  A car hit a brick building and supposedly wreaked so much damage it was considered an unsafe structure. (Totally NOT TRUE,but nonetheless it is now gone). Why? because minds like yours "drew the line"  started mounting fines against the owner of this building until they had no choice but to demolish it. 
    Most of the buildings you are referring to are not in danger of collapsing on themselves.   The School house myself and volunteers spend a lot of our time on, even though it has had no practical maintenance done in it in a half century, it is in no danger whatsoever of collapsing.   Over the years,  idiots have trashed it on the inside, set fire to the burnable elements of it, the last , resulting in the final portion of the Auditorium's roof coming down.  Did no structural damage to the building at all.  Do YOU care?  According to your statement ,probably not. Your very statement is among the mentality of those who would just rather fill landfills every where with old buildings. And, hey you may get your way, but not if I can help it .

Our historic preservation ordinance MAY hold the City responsible for preserving historic buildings, but the City is doing a next-to-nothing job of doing that.

Jacksonville has done a poor (at best)  job of EVER preserving anything.  Private entities such as Preservation SOS are tired of the same old same old and are combating the mindless City of Jacksonville, to save some of our historic places.

Ormonde

August 21, 2012, 03:08:16 PM
Historic Architecture represents our past. We all have a past. Which makes us what we are today. Without a past, We are a shell of what we can be in the future. We should band together to make sure that protection laws and standards are enforced. We need to gather signatures and prove we mean business. I will show up anytime to support this cause. I am horrified when I hear of us losing more of our Architectural Heritage in Jacksonville. I have seen so too many Architectural Gems in Jacksonville disappear. A real shame. We have lost parts of the Fabric of our Archtectural Heritage and Identity of our city. Forever lost. Nothing can replace them. These cultural losses lessen the value and beauty of our city. Enough is enough. We have so many other successful examples of keeping Historic Architecture in tact. Everyone is accountable for their actions. The officials  and city politicians who are letting these things occur need to be held accountable for their actions. Protection Laws and standards enforced. We need to ensure all of these building and structures get the historic designation and protection they deserve so that  no one can alter our citys Architectural Heritage and Identity. No one has that right. Corporate bullies wanting prime property and wanting to raze a historic building. Greed is no excuse. And is unacceptable. A city with no Architectural Identity is just another city. We have a very unique and eclectic Architectural Identity here. Let's keep it intact and protect that at all costs.

Timkin

August 21, 2012, 04:54:47 PM
^   This sounds like the posting of a preservation-minded person . 

jamesh1977

August 21, 2012, 10:02:46 PM
I think having historical landmarks in a city is a great thing, but at what point do we draw the line. Most of these buildings are condemned and collapsing in on themselves. They are more of a hazard and an eyesore than usable property. Why is Jacksonville bent on holding on to the past. Many other cities have allowed large companies to come in and renovate historical buildings, leaving the outside intact. This keeps the historic look of the area, but brings in modern business. The look of the downtown area is so appealing when you drive through Jacksonville, but it's just a lot of empty buildings that are falling apart and a few small shops that are struggling to pull what little foot traffic in they can.

You are way off on your first statement.  You COULDN'T think that having historic buildings is a great thing ,otherwise you wouldn't be among the masses who have no value, no respect , no consideration whatsoever for the VERY VERY few historic buildings that remain.  The line you are speaking of , doesn't exist and this is practiced more often than you think ,  Less than a week ago a century old building , not even in that bad of shape was razed.  A car hit a brick building and supposedly wreaked so much damage it was considered an unsafe structure. (Totally NOT TRUE,but nonetheless it is now gone). Why? because minds like yours "drew the line"  started mounting fines against the owner of this building until they had no choice but to demolish it. 
    Most of the buildings you are referring to are not in danger of collapsing on themselves.   The School house myself and volunteers spend a lot of our time on, even though it has had no practical maintenance done in it in a half century, it is in no danger whatsoever of collapsing.   Over the years,  idiots have trashed it on the inside, set fire to the burnable elements of it, the last , resulting in the final portion of the Auditorium's roof coming down.  Did no structural damage to the building at all.  Do YOU care?  According to your statement ,probably not. Your very statement is among the mentality of those who would just rather fill landfills every where with old buildings. And, hey you may get your way, but not if I can help it .

Our historic preservation ordinance MAY hold the City responsible for preserving historic buildings, but the City is doing a next-to-nothing job of doing that.

Jacksonville has done a poor (at best)  job of EVER preserving anything.  Private entities such as Preservation SOS are tired of the same old same old and are combating the mindless City of Jacksonville, to save some of our historic places.

I DO CARE. I think you may not have read my entire comment or misunderstood. I was commenting on the fact that, according to this list, the shotgun houses are "rapidly deteriorating beyond economical repair" and "a demolition permit is allegedly being sought" for the Guaranty Trust and Savings Bank. My opinion is only based on what I'm reading in this article.

I do feel some of these buildings are hazardous. Public School #4, as you pointed out, is host to vandals. They are idiots, but they are at risk of getting hurt in buildings like this one. It's in an isolated area with little to no maintenance.

Someone has to maintain these buildings. I don't think the city is going to step in anytime soon to help with this. I was only suggesting that instead of labeling these buildings as historic, expecting an already financially drained city to fix them,  we sell them to companies in the agreement that the exterior remain the same. That allows the building to stay, the city to make a profit and bring more businesses to the downtown area.

Timkin

August 21, 2012, 10:27:22 PM
Well I am very definitely along with my crew helping to maintain #4.  As to the three shotgun houses, you're right.. they probably are beyond saving ( which makes me wonder.. why whoever went to the trouble of moving them ,only to let them sit and rot. )   

At this point , the ONLY thing the City has done for #4 is haul the curbside yard debris myself and my volunteers place, to the street.  They pay their MCCD people to come post a notice of all the violations of the building on a fence, where no one but the vagrants and vandals will see it.  the OWNER , turns out , IS  paying a third party company to secure the building.  By nightfall the idiots are back undoing that.  We are doing our best to keep up with it and keep the place looking halfway decent.

You wouldn't want a supposedly , broke City footing the tab for demolishing these places..  It would be quite costly, and way smarter to mothball them until a use can be identified.   But the City demonstrates the exact opposite and demolishes them without any consideration.   The wrong people are in charge.


 
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