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Suburban Jacksonville: County Road 210 Corridor

Metro Jacksonville explores an area that has made Northern St. Johns County one of the most rapidly growing communities in the country over the last decade: County Road 210.

Published February 20, 2012 in Neighborhoods      17 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


feature

About County Road 210

County Road 210 is an east west highway in St. Johns County that connects Green Cove Springs with Ponte Vedra Beach. According to the 2010 US Census, the population of St. Johns County increased by 54.3%, with the lion's share of growth occurring in the northern section of the county as it continues to bloom into a bedroom community of Jacksonville. As a result, anchored by Nocatee to the east and RiverTown to the west, County Road 210 has been transformed from a rural two lane road to a four lane highway, just west of Interstate 95.  


A glimpse of what the entire County Road 210 corridor looked like a decade ago.


Moving into the results of the last decade's building boom.








A left over from the area's days as a rural stop off Interstate 95.


























Residential County Road 210

County Road 210's residential areas tend to be subdivisions with limited connectivity with their surroundings.  Many include stormwater retention ponds serving as man-made waterfront amenities.  In addition, a number of communities are single entry gated developments.
























The real estate bust has slowed growth but St. Johns County is prepared for more.  There are several miles of new four lane roadways waiting for more growth to accommodate the area.


Before: 1994




After: 2010



Article by Ennis Davis







17 Comments

blfair

February 20, 2012, 07:23:37 AM
Aye, the land of 2x4s and EIFS...

dougskiles

February 20, 2012, 08:16:40 AM
And just think, this all took place WITH a state growth management agency.  Now that DCA has been dismantled, I shudder to think of what will happen in the next cycle.

Know Growth

February 20, 2012, 08:46:28 AM
Lot's of former working timber lands.....Rayonier I believe.
Twelve Mile Swamp Conservation Lands purchase/Cummer Trust involved complicated development rights transfer,L.Pappas.
without going to files ,only memory but I also recall multi thousand acre tract related to Peyton's.
Citizen's Sector Plan process sealed the fate years ago.FTU careful to quote select citizen participant; to the effect,we love having all the trees but the projected growth is inevitable.

In the big picture,perhaps we really wanted,needed the 210 Growth.
Good study for future expansion assessment.

Tacachale

February 20, 2012, 10:18:44 AM
^Did north miami lose his password, or are there really two people who write like that?

stephendare

February 20, 2012, 10:23:44 AM
^Did north miami lose his password, or are there really two people who write like that?

north miami is taking advantage of our rules which allow you to have a different screen name so long as you decommission your original screen name.

Weve had other posters over the years attempt to reboot their reputation with a simple name change.

Sometimes it works.

Ocklawaha

February 20, 2012, 10:25:44 AM
Crime Rate Indexes
2010 Crime Rate Indexes   Fruit Cove,   Jacksonville,    Miami    Flemming Isle,  SR-210  River CIty Mkt Pl    United States
Total Crime Risk Index.......66....................333..........345.......17.....................86........205.......................100
Murder Risk Index.............95....................113..........443........32.....................94........201.......................100
Rape Risk Index   .............11.....................218..........149........16.....................16.........323......................100
Robbery Risk Index.............3.....................302..........701.........4........................4........375......................100
Assault Risk Index...........207....................628..........374........28....................226........178......................100
Burglary Risk Index.........139....................425...........241.........7....................154........135......................100
Larceny Risk Index............12....................329..........240........27......................13........114......................100
Motor Vehicle Theft Index..42....................260..........371..........4......................42.........172.....................100

100 being the US "average community", the above shows how much above or below the USA 'normal' a community is. For many people, this is all of the reason for living in St. Johns, Clay, Nassau, Baker,

Frankly if all 'urban sprawl' followed the examples of 210, or Julington Plantation or WGV, IE: walks, planned retail clusters, bike trails, tree and water preservation, creeks, ponds, etc...  We might not see it as such an evil. This isn't just the land of the HOA, it's the kingdom of the CDD fees. While many if not most are autocentric in scope, today more are being planned as walkable places. Palencia, for example, has an entire village easily walkable and beautiful.

As I've said before, it's all about being a choice. We'd be a insignificant metropolitan area if it were not for additions and subdivisions. The weird part of human nature is we all think it should stop right after our own house is approved. Keeping in mind that LaVilla was a suburb, as was San Marco, San Jose, Ortega, etc... Fruit Cove, Yukon, Mandarin, Switzerland, Middleburg, Marietta, New Berlin and many others were all organic villages in their own right which were overrun by the big dog.

The downside, of course is more and more of Florida is being buried under asphalt.

mtraininjax

February 20, 2012, 10:52:41 AM
Quote
Fruit Cove, Yukon, Mandarin, Switzerland, Middleburg, Marietta, New Berlin and many others were all organic villages in their own right which were overrun by the big dog.

Mandarin died the day they changed SR13 from 2 lanes to 6 lanes. As if we could not take I-295 over to Orange Park and learn a lesson from either US17 or SR21 with their 6 lanes of hell.

thelakelander

February 20, 2012, 11:39:25 AM
Frankly if all 'urban sprawl' followed the examples of 210, or Julington Plantation or WGV, IE: walks, planned retail clusters, bike trails, tree and water preservation, creeks, ponds, etc...  We might not see it as such an evil. This isn't just the land of the HOA, it's the kingdom of the CDD fees. While many if not most are autocentric in scope, today more are being planned as walkable places. Palencia, for example, has an entire village easily walkable and beautiful.

As I've said before, it's all about being a choice. We'd be a insignificant metropolitan area if it were not for additions and subdivisions. The weird part of human nature is we all think it should stop right after our own house is approved. Keeping in mind that LaVilla was a suburb, as was San Marco, San Jose, Ortega, etc... Fruit Cove, Yukon, Mandarin, Switzerland, Middleburg, Marietta, New Berlin and many others were all organic villages in their own right which were overrun by the big dog.

The overlooked thing mentioned in this post is to make sure all of these places are at least covering their impact's cost at the public level.  That means, evaluating them outside of their borders.  For example, when a SR 13 is widened to six lanes or a SR 9B is being built, there is a capital cost and an annual maintenance cost that will last for eternity.  By the same token, for new schools, parks, libraries, police, fire, etc. there's a capital cost associated with the structures housing them plus annual costs (salary, benefits, pensions, cars, equipment, etc.) associated with hiring public employees to operate them.  Are we for sure that the greater metropolitan area hasn't been tasked with the burden of sharing in with these additional costs? 

I for one believe that if the majority of recently built lower density development was covering its costs, our public budgets would have surpluses instead of continued deficits, considering we've been endorsing this development pattern for over fifty years now.  As long as communities are rightfully covering their costs and we're not robbing Peter to pay Paul, I'm cool with it.  However, when we can't maintain our parks, invest properly in our schools, and consider closing our public libraries, I have serious problems.

Tacachale

February 20, 2012, 05:00:24 PM
^I'm all for choice, so long as there really is choice. Who wants a city with great suburbs, as determined by the people who live there, and a lacking urban environment? And that's besides the associated costs of building new infrastructure compared to infill.

Any new neighborhood should have all its working parts, and recent experience has made me very skeptical that this is much of a concern in these insular suburban developments.

Know Growth

February 20, 2012, 08:34:58 PM
^Did north miami lose his password, or are there really two people who write like that?

north miami is taking advantage of our rules which allow you to have a different screen name so long as you decommission your original screen name.

Weve had other posters over the years attempt to reboot their reputation with a simple name change.

Sometimes it works.

Certain NM posts were certainly an element to MJ "news" placement growth.

Kickbacks- our first disagreement per your own statement,proved to be the moral seam of reputations.

I am a recovering MJer....striving to refrain!


Glad to see Brand recognition!
Simply changed computers,forgot password,might have sent Ennis or Dare an email to regain but grew tired of NM for MJ considering the area is becoming so much like my native North Miami in uncanny,predictable ways.

MJ is entertainment and offers some small margin of insight.

tufsu1

February 20, 2012, 08:45:17 PM
^ thanks for the clarification

cline

February 20, 2012, 08:53:03 PM
^Did north miami lose his password, or are there really two people who write like that?

north miami is taking advantage of our rules which allow you to have a different screen name so long as you decommission your original screen name.

Weve had other posters over the years attempt to reboot their reputation with a simple name change.

Sometimes it works.

Kickbacks- our first disagreement per your own statement,proved to be the moral seam of reputations.

I am a recovering MJer....striving to refrain!


Glad to see Brand recognition!
Simply changed computers,forgot password,might have sent Ennis or Dare an email to regain but grew tired of NM for MJ considering the area is becoming so much like my native North Miami in uncanny,predictable ways.

MJ is entertainment and offers some small margin of insight.

'

Clearly some moderators prefer to filter some posts more than others...stay strong NM (KG), we need your insight.

Ocklawaha

February 20, 2012, 10:10:18 PM
I'd think we pay for our improvements here in WGV, just our subdivision covers a square mile. We have built two new schools and two new fire stations with our CDD funds. We 'tax ourselves' about $5,000 per year per residence which is over and above a HOA fees of $100-500 monthly.

It's going to get interesting out here when gas hits that $5 dollar a gallon mark and JTA continues to fail and fumble any chance at commuter rail, or even quality motor coach.

OCKLAWAHA

thelakelander

February 20, 2012, 11:16:10 PM
Does the CDD pay for the school and fire station employee salaries and pensions or is that burden shared by everyone in the county?  What's going on with the World Commerce Center these days?  That area really needs its own commercial center.

Tacachale

February 22, 2012, 08:52:01 AM
^i doubt those funds would cover staff, though the people who live there are clearly paying taxes. Of course they'd be paying that wherever they lived.

thelakelander

February 22, 2012, 09:00:47 AM
At what point do the taxes you pay not cover the expense you put on the rest of society?  At some point some entity is left without a chair when the music stops.  What do you think is the best way to balance that?

Tacachale

February 22, 2012, 09:42:48 AM
^If you're asking me, I doubt it's all that different from what you think. We ought to implement stronger impact and mobility fees for development in outlying areas, and incentivize infill development. The revenues from this should be used to help improve infrastructure in already developed areas, such as improved transit and services. And we ought to demand better planning for all development, including taking into account the costs and risks to everyone of having to drive everywhere, sometimes for considerable distances.
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