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Most Walkable Jacksonville Neighborhoods 2011

According to Walk Score, there is no "Walker's Paradise" in Jacksonville. However, there are a few urban districts in Jacksonville that qualify as being walkable neighborhoods. Here are Jacksonville's 10 most walkable neighborhoods, according to Walk Score's 2011 rankings.

Published August 9, 2011 in Urban Issues      17 Comments    Open printer friendly version of this article Print Article


Walkable Neighborhoods

Picture a walkable neighborhood. You lose weight each time you walk to the grocery store. You stumble home from last call without waiting for a cab. You spend less money on your car - or you don't own a car. When you shop, you support your local economy. You talk to your neighbors.

What makes a neighborhood walkable?


A center: Walkable neighborhoods have a discernible center, whether it's a shopping district, a main street, or a public space.

Density: The neighborhood is compact enough for local businesses to flourish and for public transportation to run frequently.

Mixed income, mixed use: Housing is provided for everyone who works in the neighborhood: young and old, singles and families, rich and poor. Businesses and residences are located near each other.

Parks and public space: There are plenty of public places to gather and play.

Pedestrian-centric design: Buildings are placed close to the street to cater to foot traffic, with parking lots relegated to the back.


Nearby schools and workplaces: Schools and workplaces are close enough that most residents can walk from their homes.

Streets Designed for Everyone


Complete Streets are roads designed for everyone who uses them, including bicyclists, pedestrians of all ages and abilities, and people getting on and off transit vehicles. These streets are:

Accessible: There are wheelchair ramps, plenty of benches with shade, sidewalks on all streets, etc.

Well-connected: Streets form a connected grid that improves traffic by providing many routes to any destination.

Built for the right speed: Lanes are narrow or traffic calming is in place to control speed.

Comfortable: Pedestrian medians at intersections, count-down crosswalk timers, bicycle lanes, protected bus shelters, etc. make the street work better for those outside of a car.


Left image: One-Mile Walk in a Compact Neighborhood
Right image: One-Mile Walk in a Sprawling Suburb



Walk Score Scorecard

Walker's Paradise (dark green): 100 - 90

Very Walkable (light green): 89 - 70

Somewhat Walkable (yellow): 69 - 50

Car-Dependent (red): 49 - 0


Statistical Data:

4% of Jacksonville residents have a Walk Score of 70 or above.

Jacksonville's most walkable neighborhoods are Downtown Jacksonville, San Marco, Riverside. Jacksonville's least walkable neighborhoods are Eagle Bend, Otis, Black Hammock Island.

20% have a Walk Score of at least 50.

80% of Jacksonville residents live in Car-Dependent neighborhoods.

Jacksonville's 10 Most Walkable Neighborhoods on the Next Page



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17 Comments

Miss Fixit

August 09, 2011, 07:50:21 AM
I have never heard the area West of Springfield referred to as "Hogan's Creek".  Isn't that Durkeeville?

AmyLynne

August 09, 2011, 07:58:15 AM
I have never heard the area West of Springfield referred to as "Hogan's Creek".  Isn't that Durkeeville?

I haven't either, but I think Durkeeville is west of 95 along Myrtle Ave.

And I always thought the area they have highlighted in #7 was called the Southbank...not the Southside.

Tacachale

August 09, 2011, 09:20:43 AM
^It usually is. This may be one of those naming discrepancies that are propagated by Google Maps and the like.

Max

August 09, 2011, 12:28:41 PM
For real??? I wouldn't drive through half of these neighborhoods, let alone walk them.  Nice try but lets face it - kitchey & cosmopolitan Jacksonville is not, but it's always entertaining to what MJ pitch it as such....

Captain Zissou

August 09, 2011, 12:38:12 PM
For real??? I wouldn't drive through half of these neighborhoods, let alone walk them.  Nice try but lets face it - kitchey & cosmopolitan Jacksonville is not, but it's always entertaining to what MJ pitch it as such....

Care to support that argument with any facts??

Jason

August 09, 2011, 12:38:49 PM
Welcome Max!

Kitchey and cosmopolitan have nothing to do with walkability, nor does your non-desire to patronize a certain area on foot or in a car.

The article was very well done and shows what enhances the pedestrian experience and how well certain neighborhoods apply these factors. 

thelakelander

August 09, 2011, 12:43:23 PM
No one ever said Jax was cosmopolitan or walkable.  However, only a fool would suggest that it (or any +100 year old city) has no walkable areas within its limits.  Nevertheless, MJ didn't cook up the stats in this particular article or even suggest that we agree with all of them.  They come from www.walkscore.com, which happens to be sourced in the article.  With all of this said, yes there are things we can do in this town to become more walkable, which the staff of MJ truly believes would be in the best interest of our city and its future.

MusicMan

August 09, 2011, 04:50:16 PM
Avondale did not make the top 5? It was singled out by the American Plannera Association recently for exactly that style of life, YES?

thelakelander

August 09, 2011, 05:00:06 PM
Walkscore split Riverside/Avondale into two individual neighborhoods. The Riverside part ranks high but Avondale on it's own doesn't (probably not enough mix of uses within the border they assigned). Also, Fairfax, the area south just south of Avondale ranks pretty high too.

blandman

August 09, 2011, 06:42:25 PM
I find it odd that Jacksonville doesn't have better biking infrastructure.  Southside, San Marco, Springfield, Riverside, and Hogan's Creek (maybe even Murray Hill) are all easily within reach of potential bicycle commuters working Downtown or on the south bank. I'm sure there are some hardcore biking hipsters out there who brave the streets of Jacksonville, but why not make it easier for the less adventurous?

thelakelander

August 09, 2011, 07:12:42 PM
I agree. Luckily things are in the works to improve bike network connectivity within the urban core.

Dashing Dan

August 09, 2011, 09:52:10 PM
The walk score is based on how far you are from where you live to where you might go to eat work or shop.  It doesn't account for connectivity or street infrastructure.  The walk score folks are working on a better methodology that would account for these additional factors, but the current walk scores are based on the old methodology. 

floridaforester

August 09, 2011, 11:59:24 PM
I still cannot wrap my brain around the fact that San Marco supposedly scores higher than Riverside considering there is no grocery store in San marco.  To me that should be given a higher weighting considering the importance to everyday life.  I'd really like to see how those scores are calculated.  I think part of the issue might be the boundaries used to delineate the neighborhoods.  Living near 5 Pts, we can walk to anything we could want or need.  If we can't walk to where we need to go, we can always ride bikes to get there.

Also, I'm surprised that Murray Hill or Avondale doesn't score higher.  One more thing, Regency ?! is a walkable neighborhood?  Looking at the map they are including just a cluster of businesses located around the mall.  I would hope the mall would be somewhat walkable but try walking across any of the 8 lanes roads that surround it.  Actual residents within that "neighborhood" should be a requirement for inclusion in the walk score list as well.

BTW Max, it is attitudes such as yours that keeps many areas of Jax mired in the kind of mediocrity where the st johns town center is the epitome of culture and TGIFridays is considered fine cuisine.

rainfrog

August 10, 2011, 12:48:32 AM
I'm curious about the map that shows the one-mile walk for both a grid and cul-de-sacs. Is there a website where you can generate a map like that? That's really cool!

thelakelander

August 10, 2011, 12:52:50 AM
The Regency residential numbers come from the apartment complexes along Monument Road. However, it's certainly not walkable although there are a mix of uses in that area. Looking at the walkscore maps, Five Points appears to be more of a "walker's paradise" than downtown but it's score is dragged down by the borders assigned as Riverside.

Noone

August 10, 2011, 04:09:12 AM
I have never heard the area West of Springfield referred to as "Hogan's Creek".  Isn't that Durkeeville?

+1

Chris, Your post sent me on a wirlwind tour of related links that popped up. We paddled Hogans Creek before. Do you want to do it again and take it under the Hyatt parking lot? Would love to hear more about the exciting things that you and others are doing to Make it Happen. 

Bativac

August 10, 2011, 08:28:35 AM
The Regency residential numbers come from the apartment complexes along Monument Road. However, it's certainly not walkable although there are a mix of uses in that area. Looking at the walkscore maps, Five Points appears to be more of a "walker's paradise" than downtown but it's score is dragged down by the borders assigned as Riverside.

My wife and her friends lived in the Regency area a few years back while we were all in college. They had no cars and walked everywhere - in fact that was one of the big draws of the area. So I don't know whether it's "considered" walkable but it was definitely walkable for people living there. A lot of this seems to be subjective.
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